Anons, I have tried to find a job outside my home country (Finland), but it's extremely hard.

Anons, I have tried to find a job outside my home country (Finland), but it's extremely hard. I have something like 5 years dev experience and 2 years of lead/management experience, but it doesn't matter. Normally I don't get any response and when I do it's usually after I have send 30-40 new applications. I have now send about 120 applications, but still no job offer. Is it truly this hard to get a job outside of your own country?

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's easy to find a job in another EU country if you have skills in demand.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I would think those skills would be in demand

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      OP can only suck cocks.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It would be nice to know what skills are in demand, but at least it seems that those skills are something I don't have.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Go to networking events for whatever your software field is.

    Also, if you want american, try looking for companies that just recieve seed funding. They are usually expanding aggressively. Dont pay as much as FAGMAN big tech but probably very competitive for finnish salaries. Might be harder as a EU resident but its worth a shot

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I think salary is the issue with most of the EU countries. My current salary is about 65000€ annually and I wouldn't want to lower my pay grade.

      I have been checking companies from USA, but job from one of those companies doesn't seem very realistic if I can't even find a job from some other EU country.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I think salary is the issue with most of the EU countries. My current salary is about 65000€ annually and I wouldn't want to lower my pay grade.
        I don't think it's salary. I live in Hungary and get similar base salary (before bonuses) doing Python backend stuff. I'm also working outside my home country, and I'm not from the EU, so my employer has to sponsor me for a work visa, but I didn't find it particularly hard to find this job or the previous one-- I had multiple offers to choose from both times. My job search process pretty much just involved updating my CV, getting a bit tipsy, and using LinkedIn EasyApply for any jobs that looked halfway relevant for my experience. Maybe the job market has changed, or maybe you're an unappealing candidate for some reason, or maybe you just need to work on highlighting your skills in you CV.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          What is your role in that company? Are you just a BE developer? How many times did you click the EasyApply before you got a job?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >What is your role in that company? Are you just a BE developer?
            If I recall correctly, my official title is "Senior Software Engineer". I'm on a team that develops software for internal use at a company of ~600 people. My stack at the current job is basically just postgres and FastAPI. When I was looking to move to Europe a few years ago, I applied to a bunch of places in Poland, Hungary, and Szekelyfold-- say maybe 50 or so. I got three job offers out of that in Warsaw, Wroclaw, and Budapest. When I changed jobs two years ago, I applied to maybe ten places around Budapest (since I live nearby, and the job market isn't that deep), and I got two job offers out of it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You have only sent out 120 applications. You completely underestimate how bullshit this process is. I sympathize with your autism finnbro but your best way to get a job is always going to be through a personal network. Since you lack that, you're going to have to deal with the meatgrinder that is the job market. Try going to networking events in your particular specialty. It wont help now but like planting a garden, will yield you much in time.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is your CV in English?
    Are your social profiles up to date (ie. Monster, Indeed, Linkedin, etc.)?
    Do you have relevant modern skills (ie. Scrum or any other agile methodology, React, Angular, .NET, Django, SQL Server, Mongo, etc)?
    You need to have experience or knowledge in modern frameworks and tools in order to make it. People are not going to hire you if you have 5 years of experience in something like Java w/out frameworks.
    I have only 3 years of experience and most recruiters contact me after seeing my LinkedIn or Monster profiles. I don't even need to look for jobs. This is because I always try to learn the most popular tools available.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I only have LinkedIn profile. Do you have long descriptions on your LinkedIn profile about your tasks and work you have done?

      I hope that someday I'm able to move to some other EU country and work there. Couple of years ago I was still dreaming that I could work in USA, but lost pretty much all hope when I wasn't able to get a job in any other EU country.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Django
      fwiw, I've been in the Python ecosystem for a long time, and Django has certain connotations. It's a bit like being a PHP developer. When I see Django on a CV, it makes me think that you've been cowboy coding for small businesses that want to hire a single person to run their whole stack-- both frontend and backend. Someone who has been working in Python in business with enough budget or technical background to hire specialist frontend and specialist backend developers will list Flask, FastAPI, and maybe something like aiohttp or sanic or pyramid.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >cowboy coding for small businesses that want to hire a single person to run their whole stack
        Why is this a problem? I did that couple of years and I learned more in that way than in any team.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I also did a few year of cowboy coding, and I learned a bunch during that time too. Maybe it's just my experience with interviewing people, but when I see a CV that lists a bunch of different technologies (like React, Angular, .NET, SQL Server, Mongo) and Django is the only Python ecosystem technology mentioned, then I mentally prepare for someone who doesn't know Python well.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >you've been cowboy coding for small businesses that want to hire a single person to run their whole stack -- both frontend and backend
        Any advice to someone who's been doing exactly that on how to best escape cowboy life and have a "normal" developer career?
        It's been fun with a lot of variety and learning opportunities but I would struggle to present that nicely on a CV, and my skillset is all over the place. Feels like I would be better off if I just took a random junior job back when I started.
        Do I just learn the most popular local stack, accept a pay cut by dropping my cowboy jobs and taking the first decent full time position I can find, and then try to progress quickly?

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    look for a job with an international company then look for internal job postings in overseas offices

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Be less truthful about your experience. Instead of 5 years, say 8 or something. There's a reason why the top of the corporate ladder are mostly socio/psycho-paths.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm not sure about other cultures and countries, but in Finland they might check your background such as work experience. Isn't this the case in other EU countries?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Just say you did freelancing. How is there even a possibility to check that?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You need to have registered one man company for that. At least this is the case in Finland, but I suspect that this might also be case in other EU countries. Anyone can find out if you had a company or not.

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