Archaeology & Ethnography Travel

What are SighSee's top spots for those whose interests are ethnography/anthropology/archaeology/animal and plant biodiversity?

Museum suggestions are welcomed, but places ripe for amateur exploration are ideally suggested.

An obvious example is Socotra Island, the only serious academic of the island's people comes from a Soviet academic who was there in the late 20th century (and still hasn't been translated in English).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitaly_Naumkin

There are certainly less known gems of obsure peoples whose stories haven't been captured/explored yet?

Meeting the Eyle clansman in Somalia seems like another great and valuable trip for example.

Please share satellite imagery tips you use to stalk out potential locations as well, especially if for ancient burials/graves.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griffin_Warrior_Tomb

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  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I would like to go to the Pontic-Caspian steppe to see the Indo-European homeland but unfortunately that’s a warzone right now

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    that angry loudmouth guy with long hair on youtube has been going on about that place in turkey. gobleki tepe? that looks pretty cool

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >archaeology etc
    I'm in Malta right now only because it was cheap as frick (saw a really good deal), but something I did not really know about before coming here is that they have many very significant prehistoric sites here. Don't think you're going to start digging and find something new though, these are some massively overpopulated tiny little islands that's for sure and all the main sites require to buy a ticket. I think there's some on private land you can trespass over to but that's about it.
    One thing you can find around the islands are "cart ruts" which are grooves cut into the rocks from 1000s of years ago that are not yet explained what they were for. I came across some today without previously knowing they were some where I was going

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yes, Malta is great - much of the known archaeology was documented thanks to a doctor there who did it in his free time
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Themistocles_Zammit

      Good book if you want to learn more details:
      https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/archaeology-of-malta/939848C5CD3C97E4373264AE3D73F62E

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    During my first Euro trip I liked going to the place of old battlefields. Its a nice way to plan your itinerary and discover the countryside and cuisine outside the big cities

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ethiopian Highland Churches

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I stole pottery shards from Miletus and found some kind of bone by the storehouses near the agora. No idea if it was human or its age

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    The surroundings of Yassıhüyük/Gordion in Turkiye are full of tumuli just asking to be digged down. Instead, you have shepherds hearding their goats on them.

    Frick around in Kapadokya and maybe you'll find an underground town or two. Same in Konya, if you go near Çatalhöyük

    Lastly, The eastern countryside have priceless mesopotamian sites, among the oldest for everything - domestication of weath, cattle, use of tools, whatever. It's still pretty much abandoned

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Is it safe to go exploring in these random areas in Turkey or do you need a guide?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Language barrier is too much to do without guide

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Some of the Neolithic sites in Scotland are neat. The more well known ones like Calanis and Skara Brae can get busy but there are lots of duns, brochs and standing stones dotted around that “never” get visitors

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    My ethnographic interests are pretty niche (I’m more of a sociolinguistics, dialectology, linguistic anthropology nerd), but I have had really good times in ethnic Khmer/Mon-Khmer villages in Northeastern Thailand. There’s an interesting mix of Lao, Thai, and a funny dialect of Khmer spoken on the streets, and a lot of code-mixing. There are also a few almost-extinct little languages scattered around that part of the country.

    But it’s not something that would be interesting, or probably even noticeable, to normal people.

    I’m also a fan of Paraguay for the way they have preserved and even expanded the use of an indigenous language where nobody else in the Americas has even come close, but again, that’s really just for sociolinguistics dweebs; Guaraní culture isn’t necessarily all that interesting.

    And I like vestigial ethnolinguistic exclaves, like Welsh speakers in Argentina or the miscellaneous Germanic colonies of the Americas. Oh, and the surviving descendants of people from the former German New Guinea who have somehow managed to preserve the world’s only living German-based creole language, at least to some degree, really interest me even if there‘s nothing left but a small community of Polynesian-bogan hybrids in Australian trailer parks nowadays.

    For more conventionally interesting animal life, I had a great safari in easy-mode Kenya. Peoplewise, I enjoyed the Omo Valley in Ethiopia, mildly unpleasant human zoo aftertaste notwithstanding.

    When it comes to archaeology I’m even more basic. Saw lots of cool old stuff in Turkey.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I’m also a fan of Paraguay
      >And I like vestigial ethnolinguistic exclaves
      wait until you find out about the many colonies in paraguay (from mennonites to white supremacists wanting to build utopia, to all sorts of people fleeig europe to avoid getting vaxxed or imprisoned, etc) and how, in many of these places, guarani mixes with other non-spanish languages (e.g. with german in filadelfia or colonia indipendencia, with ucranian in colonia fram, with japanese in colonia la colema, and so on - german being by far the main one).
      have you ever been to paraguay btw? i am here currently and so many things you discover by being here are just unknown to the internet..

      also, apart from its diaspora communities, paraguay's 19 indigenous ethnic groups make it a really really intersting place ethnographically speaking, although getting into the more interesting parts isn't easy

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >i am here currently and so many things you discover by being here are just unknown to the internet..
        Like what?

        NTA but Paraguay has always struck me as a "last frontier" kind of place.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >japanese in colonia la colema
        Is Wikipedia wrong or this place not actually Japanese anymore?
        >It has 5,234 inhabitants (2002 Census) of which 7% are of Japanese origin, and the remainder are mostly Paraguayan and a small percentage of mestizos.
        https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Colmena_(Paraguay)

        >although getting into the more interesting parts isn't easy
        Could you name these parts?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          I wouldn't doubt if that's true. 100 years ago, latin america was an attractive place for Japanese to emigrate but that hasn't been true in 50 years while reverse migration back to Japan has occurred.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, I have visited Paraguay, although not in some years and probably not the most interesting parts of the country—I was hanging out with a friend in Asunción for a few days, and doing some work with sugarcane farmers in the Cordillera department. What little I saw seemed really cool, and again, as a language nerd I loved the fact that there are people who aren’t even indigenous speaking some Guaraní—it’s not something you see elsewhere in South America.

        And I know a little about the Mennonites in South America first-hand; my brother-in-law was born into a Mennonite community with branches in Colombia and Uruguay, among others, although his family are modern Mennonites and don’t speak German anymore, unlike the Old Order types. My only experience with South American Japanese is in Brazil and Peru, though—I didn’t know there were Asians in Paraguay.

  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Check out Bhutan

  11. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I remember someone telling me about that stone. Its so beautiful!!

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    USA Walmarts

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Myanmar, lots of artifacts/gemstones being evacuated from there now with the conflict heating up

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