By car which route ?

Would you take.

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  1. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ferry from Baja to Mazatlan or down Sonora?

  2. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    You won't even make it to Jalisco before being kidnapped

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      probably red just because i'm unfamiliar with what ferrying from baja would be like and i'd rather avoid complication

      it really aint that bad, just follow the basic 'travelling in a somewhat dangerous country' rules

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Hm
        Ferry is 100 dollars and overnight

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          if ferrying sounds fun to you then go for it, otherwise just do baja as an independent trip. 100 dollars is pretty expensive but idk if you're poor like me

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            I’m just curious if the red route is interesting like if it’s just dessert or there cool canyons and towns

            • 8 months ago
              Anonymous

              what

              Baja if you surf, Mainland if you don't and you can see the Copper Canyon. But if I wasn't going through Baja I'd skip the car entirely. The Mexican bus system is Elder God tier win and you are waaaay less of a target without a car.

              said; beautiful canyons, towns are probably comparable to most non-tourist baja towns. if you want green stuff, drive further east at the start and drive down sonora

              Yeah stay away from the north homosexual. If I ever see you around Monterrey I will find you and break you in half.

              on my way

  3. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Baja if you surf, Mainland if you don't and you can see the Copper Canyon. But if I wasn't going through Baja I'd skip the car entirely. The Mexican bus system is Elder God tier win and you are waaaay less of a target without a car.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      seconding the bus, it is honestly amazing getting around mexico on the bus lines. dirt cheap and yeah you'll never be sweating bullets driving on a lonely road. driving in mexico is also just not for the feint of heart in general, the roads themselves can be scary and cities are a fricking nightmare to drive in because people don't give a shit. walked to Tijuana once and after a quick look around i knew i'd never drive in mexico willfully

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Don't forget your temporary import permit!
        My #1 recommendation: drive to Texas first. Tijuana to Cancun is 4500 kilometers, versus 2300 km for Matamoros to Cancun. Believe me, you'd rather drive those extra miles in the USA.
        Most recommended route by experienced Mexican tourist drivers is crossing into Piedras Negras and taking MEX-57 toward Mexico City. Bypass CDMX and take MEX-150 to MEX-145 to MEX-180, which will take you across southern Veracruz toward the Yucatan. All of these are modern highways; expect to pay tolls.
        It is possible to take MEX-180 around the entire Gulf of Mexico. The drive from Matamoros/Reynosa to Tampico is a great cruise, one of the best free roads in Mexico. The roads in Veracruz state suck, but take your time while driving and find a room by 5 PM.

        To the contrary, I'd strongly recommend driving in Mexico versus riding the bus, unless you want to stay in Mexico City. You must remain alert at all times behind the wheel, true, but driving around gives one so much more freedom than bussing around. You can also bring a lot more stuff with you in a car.

        if ferrying sounds fun to you then go for it, otherwise just do baja as an independent trip. 100 dollars is pretty expensive but idk if you're poor like me

        Bringing a vehicle across on the Baja ferry costs a lot more than 100 dollars. You will need an import permit for your vehicle BEFORE you embark on the ferry.

        I’m just curious if the red route is interesting like if it’s just dessert or there cool canyons and towns

        Up to you if you want to poke around in the Sierra Madre Occidental. It is beautiful, yes, but also has a well-earned reputation for lawlessness. The coastal highway passes through scrubland, mostly. It is usually quite green this time of year. The Sonoran Desert ends in northern Sonora.

        Gringos are unironically safe but he is quite literally driving through the worst states. . Zacatecas is literally a warzone, the only thing he could add is a stop in Tamaulipas.

        Tamps is a narco state, true, but I've never had issues driving as a foreigner in the state. The highways are heavily patrolled.

        is the sea of cortez gross or is it really nice? inlet seas are always hit or miss
        i was woried there was like farm runoff or something

        Northern portions of the sea are absolutely beautiful - clear and warm and calm.

        tips on regular-life things
        i plan to be in mexico or central america for a while

        like credit card/debit cards
        best place to find a real apartment if i want in tulum or cdmx?

        get a bank card which refunds ATM fees and gives you the mid-market rate. I use Schwab Bank.

  4. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah stay away from the north homosexual. If I ever see you around Monterrey I will find you and break you in half.

  5. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Which one won't get me chainsaw murdered?

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Gringos are unironically safe but he is quite literally driving through the worst states. . Zacatecas is literally a warzone, the only thing he could add is a stop in Tamaulipas.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        So the ferry could skip these war zones?

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          Both of your routes go through Zacatecas and both get too close to Aguascalientes for my liking. The red route goes through Ciudad Obregón, Sonora which I, not being an american, would stay away from. I don't think you'd die or anything but it's sketch as frick. If you can get through that first half of the trip without issues the south will be whatever.

          Forgot to mention that Sinaloa is okay. Actually I'd, rather ferry to Sinaloa than drive through Sonora. Just better sights IMO. Stop at Mazatlán or something.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Is Baja chill?

            • 8 months ago
              Anonymous

              Too chill. There's absolutely nothing to do over there. There's a town called Loreto which is a smaller, more laid back version of Cabo.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                So i wanted to do a vlog-series of the small towns.
                If i go baja to mazatlan (100 dollar overnight ferry) it seems chiller and then i'll be in south by a few days and there it's just chiller
                Sounds good?

                any other cool towns or sites to do ?

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                El Sargento, La Ventana, Todos Santos, El Tecolote, Los Barriles. Cabo Pulmo has snorkeling and shit.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                nice

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Gringos are unironically safe but he is quite literally driving through the worst states. . Zacatecas is literally a warzone, the only thing he could add is a stop in Tamaulipas.

            Thank you for the honest assessment and information.

            • 8 months ago
              Anonymous

              Sure. In general I'm just looking out for whether or not you will be caught in the middle of a sketchy situation. You hear a lot of people exaggerate on the violence here to scare americans I guess but Zacatecas is unironically really bad right now. Nobody will harm you physically, but if you are not dying (heh) to see it I wouldn't bother going simpy because it's disputed territory. Even though the entirety of Jalisco is under CJNG, Guadalajara is much safer by virtue of there being stability.

              tips on regular-life things
              i plan to be in mexico or central america for a while

              like credit card/debit cards
              best place to find a real apartment if i want in tulum or cdmx?

              I wouldn't go to either of those if I planned on living here a while, they all suffer from the AirBnB epidemic and will be expensive as shit but I guess there's no way around that in CDMX. The city is too big to commute to the touristy areas if you rent far away from them without wanting to have a nice day due to the traffic, it's LA bad.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                hm
                ok
                thoughts on a nice town to hunker down for a few months?

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                Well there's lots of them but do you want sleepy towns, beach towns, towns close to big cities, stereotypical mexican towns?

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                maybe a nice but small beach-town
                like mojitos and waves

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                Zihuatanejo, Guerrero
                Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca
                Sayulita, Nayarit
                Bahía Kino, Sonora
                Teacapán, Sinaloa
                Maruata, Michoacán

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                ty anon

  6. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    is the sea of cortez gross or is it really nice? inlet seas are always hit or miss
    i was woried there was like farm runoff or something

  7. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    tips on regular-life things
    i plan to be in mexico or central america for a while

    like credit card/debit cards
    best place to find a real apartment if i want in tulum or cdmx?

  8. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    What is driving over the border like? Do they hassle you and go through your car?

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Entering a border city is always unpleasant. You go from generic First World USA to some of the ugliest cities in Mexico. Do not hide valuables in your vehicle in case of search. You will need an import permit if you intend to drive into mainland Mexico. Nobody will tell you to get one, but rest assured, you do not want to be stopped by Mexican federal agents without one in your possession. Nobody will force you to buy car insurance either, but you will want to get a tourist policy.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      I crossed to TJ and ensenada before from SD and it was very simple. There wasn't a stop-checkpoint - it was just drive in.

  9. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    cont

    tips on regular-life things
    i plan to be in mexico or central america for a while

    like credit card/debit cards
    best place to find a real apartment if i want in tulum or cdmx?

    Mexico/central AM is still an informal economy and an offline society. Expect places that only take cash. I agree to get a low fee debit card and take $300 out at a time and that's my weekly spending including hotels. Word of mouth is still how mexico works, if you find someone you trust to have them find you a furnished apartment or room.
    Also, expect some degree of police harassment at least once, and frequent military checkpoints. The latter is annoying more than anything, they may want to look through your stuff while flagging you with an M16 but nothing bad will actually happen. Expect no english and sometimes being gestured to go when they realize you're gringo. The former is a bigger problem, I've only ever had to pay them like 2 times when it was obvious I broke a law, like driving the wrong way on a (poorly marked) street but you have to be able to call their bluff when they act threatening, something most Americans find challenging. Being polite and insistent about handing things at the station usually gets them to give up and go away but they could actually make you come to the station to pay the fine which could take all day. I recommend using gps navigation to drive through Mexico. I've heard its technically illegal but I do it anyway, most drivers there aren't following the rules. Signage is in spanish, is frequently confusing or just missing and highways sometimes end at the entrance to a city which requires several turns on city streets to reach the other side. Expect other drivers, in particular truckers to be somewhat aggressive, possibly drunk. Avoid driving through rural areas at night. There's really no go reason to be on the highway past like 9 PM.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Police interactions 'culture' for lack of a better term in mexico is so different than the US that's why american tourists are just easy marks for them. In America if you talk back to a cop you're going to lose your teeth and get 9 felonies added to your charges. In Mexico it's expected for you to argue and haggle with them on what they're claiming you did wrong. And yes a lot of the time just pretending to be a witless amerifat who can't speak spanish will have the police send you on their way because they don't want to deal with it.

      The most annoying thing with Mexico when coming at it from an orderly society/personality is Mexico's rules are whatever they feel like enforcing that day. Pay this travel tax, carry that card, talk to this official - if you go through somewhere 5 times, you will have a different experience on what they wanted or if they checked anything each of those 5 times.

      Best advice for driving in Mexico besides avoiding the one really bad narco state is make sure you do your own research on all the paperwork and insurances you need for your car before you enter the country. There's a great chance the moron doing "internal controls" won't tell you about something you need and you don't want to get stopped by a federal agent somewhere in Mexico's interior where he does actually enforce the law for whatever reason.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >you don't want to get stopped by a federal agent somewhere in Mexico's interior where he does actually enforce the law for whatever reason.
        Why? What would happen?

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Sorry, only relevant if you didn't get an import permit. In that case, you can kiss your car goodbye - the costs and hassle of recovering it won't be worth the car's value. AFAIK, your person won't be detained or forced to pay a fine, but you will be banned from importing another vehicle until you renew your passport.

          What is the worst city in Mexico?
          I saw Juarez and Chihuahua, those have to be up there right?

          Nuevo Laredo is probably a good place to get murdered. In general other than parts of TJ/Ensenada I'd get a full tank in the US, cross after sunrise, and be fricking gone by sunset.

          I spent over a week in Juarez centro in April 2021. It was surprisingly chill - the police didn't even carry rifles - but also kinda boring, with zero life after dark. Food was all right, kinda pricey with some cheap shitty options. Budget hotels are among the worst I have ever stayed in - smelly and dirty, 220-250 pesos per night. Chihuahua is a nice city, rather conservative, but with a great market and nice plazas which see plenty of people hanging out on a warm summer evening. I never had problems visiting Chihuahua. My hotel there was next to the prostitute street a couple blocks south of the Plaza de Armas. Owners were douchebags, but it only cost 130-190 pesos per night depending on your room.
          I also spent ten days in Nuevo Laredo in March 2021. The streets were not too safe, but nobody gave two hoots about the fact that I was the only gringo in town, except for a Honduran chick who wanted to marry me. I smoked some weed with some low-level cartel dudes and their friends in a blown-out shitbox parked on the main drag. Hotel Dos Laredos was a heckin' cool place to stay for only 230 pesos per night, you had to leave the key at reception every time you stepped out. Historic building, no A/C. Tamps state police do literally nothing but drive around. They have never given me a hard time.
          >other than parts of TJ/Ensenada
          Those are literally the most violent parts of the border. Ensenada is budget SoCal, a lot pricier than the rest of Mexico. It has a decent-looking tourist district, but it felt so dead and soulless when I visited in March 2023. Cheapest room I could find was 600 pesos per night, a dumpy motel on the boulevard.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ty
      Will the checkpoints literally harass me for money or is it just kinda weird. Btw, i've been through many checkpoints in East Turkey while road tripping there and they were just professional no problems. Is it like that?
      I'm ok with driving in these conditions.

      Why do people always recommend not driving at night?

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        You're safe more often than not if the police presence is from the Mexican Army/Military Police. They're....well, less corrupt on average than local police. Almost never any problems with them. Local police stopping you is almost always a shakedown. One of the common pieces of advice given to foreigners driving through Mexico is to have two wallets. Keep a 'decoy wallet' with just your ID and perhaps the equivalent of $10 or $20 and that's it. Keep the rest of your cash and credit cards in a hidden wallet and don't tell them about it.

        The common thing they will do is ask for your ID and/or whole wallet. If they saw all your cards and a lot of cash they'll know how much they can shake you down for. You want them to think all they could possibly get out of you is $10 or so. They'll either give up as it's not worth their time or you have to give up the $10 and be on your way.

        [...]
        >mojitos aren't well known in mexico, you'll have no trouble finding liquor and quart bottles of beer though
        lol i mean ideally a nice little tropical paradise town known for hot girls and easy living and not congested and safe 🙂

        [...]
        >Mexico/central AM is still an informal economy and an offline society. Expect places that only take cash. I agree to get a low fee debit card and take $300 out at a time and that's my weekly spending including hotels. Word of mouth is still how mexico works, if you find someone you trust to have them find you a furnished apartment or room.
        So ask around? Isn't there a common site the mexicans use?
        I can manage the spanish.
        [...]
        >The most annoying thing with Mexico when coming at it from an orderly society/personality is Mexico's rules are whatever they feel like enforcing that day. Pay this travel tax, carry that card, talk to this official - if you go through somewhere 5 times, you will have a different experience on what they wanted or if they checked anything each of those 5 times.
        I guess I'm ok with the disorderly society thing but am I gonna have to literally give 'bribes'?

        >I guess I'm ok with the disorderly society thing but am I gonna have to literally give 'bribes'?
        Yeah, it's a very real thing and very prominent. If you follow all this advice and an official is still demanding a lot of cash or something else, then you need to take the step of demanding you pay your fine at the local station. That's the final step you have of getting them to think you're more trouble than your worth. And if you really did do something wrong you are safer paying at the station anyway.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          >then you need to take the step of demanding you pay your fine at the local station.
          i see ty anon

          >You're safe more often than not if the police presence is from the Mexican Army/Military Police. They're....well, less corrupt on average than local police. Almost never any problems with them. Local police stopping you is almost always a shakedown. One of the common pieces of advice given to foreigners driving through Mexico is to have two wallets. Keep a 'decoy wallet' with just your ID and perhaps the equivalent of $10 or $20 and that's it. Keep the rest of your cash and credit cards in a hidden wallet and don't tell them about it.
          good advice ty anon

          so any idea on proper registration? i guess i'm just gonna drive in from TJ and keep going down Baja until i get to La paz and then the ferry to Mazatlan and then to east and the towns and CDMX and then Yucatan, i have insurance for mexico already

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >so any idea on proper registration?
            I don't know what you're asking. Are you asking about the import permit for your car? There's only one official site for it, anything else is scam.

            https://www.banjercito.com.mx/registroVehiculos

            There it is.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        The army people are generally cool albeit not very educated. Think the dumbest hillbilly boot marines but Mexican. It's the city cops that are shitty and out to get you. Federal/highway cops are somewhat better.
        As far as don't drive at night, don't. Mexico at night is truly a different world. That's when most cartel activity happens and you'll be sharing the road with truckers on meth, drunk taxi drivers, farmers driving a beat up old pickup with no lighting and wild and domestic animals.

        [...]

        >Nice, any idea of when it gets 'bad
        It gets better the further down you go, until Cabo, which is kind of a tourist trap. Below Mulegé things get noticeably more tropical but it's still arid. People grow coconuts and mangos in their front yard. The water is warm year round. Reefs and tropical fishes.
        >I crossed many times before there is literally no stopping at all
        Inspections are kind of arbitrary and random. If you cross with things that look commercial like DJ stuff they'll shake you up for taxes. They're definitely watching you cross.

        [...]
        >mojitos aren't well known in mexico, you'll have no trouble finding liquor and quart bottles of beer though
        lol i mean ideally a nice little tropical paradise town known for hot girls and easy living and not congested and safe 🙂

        [...]
        >Mexico/central AM is still an informal economy and an offline society. Expect places that only take cash. I agree to get a low fee debit card and take $300 out at a time and that's my weekly spending including hotels. Word of mouth is still how mexico works, if you find someone you trust to have them find you a furnished apartment or room.
        So ask around? Isn't there a common site the mexicans use?
        I can manage the spanish.
        [...]
        >The most annoying thing with Mexico when coming at it from an orderly society/personality is Mexico's rules are whatever they feel like enforcing that day. Pay this travel tax, carry that card, talk to this official - if you go through somewhere 5 times, you will have a different experience on what they wanted or if they checked anything each of those 5 times.
        I guess I'm ok with the disorderly society thing but am I gonna have to literally give 'bribes'?

        >Isn't there a common site the mexicans use?
        You'll have better luck taking to people but it takes time. Mexicans are big on personal relationships, cash deals, gossip a lot, all know/are related to each other.
        >am I gonna have to literally give 'bribes'?
        Possibly. It's just the way things are.
        The operative phrase is "can I pay the fine right here?" Don't call it a bribe. Don't make it a big deal. You just want to pay the fine and be on your way.
        Generally you'll have better luck talking your way out of a bribe if you did nothing wrong. But you'll get stopped for a traffic violation at some point despite your best intentions. Road signage is (possibly intentionally) confusing and in Spanish. Cops will sit in front of a stop sign conveniently hidden by a tree waiting for someone to run it. $10-20 usd is plenty.
        If you speak some Spanish you'll have a better experience and get what you're looking for more.

  10. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >mojitos aren't well known in mexico, you'll have no trouble finding liquor and quart bottles of beer though
    lol i mean ideally a nice little tropical paradise town known for hot girls and easy living and not congested and safe 🙂

    [...]
    cont
    [...]
    Mexico/central AM is still an informal economy and an offline society. Expect places that only take cash. I agree to get a low fee debit card and take $300 out at a time and that's my weekly spending including hotels. Word of mouth is still how mexico works, if you find someone you trust to have them find you a furnished apartment or room.
    Also, expect some degree of police harassment at least once, and frequent military checkpoints. The latter is annoying more than anything, they may want to look through your stuff while flagging you with an M16 but nothing bad will actually happen. Expect no english and sometimes being gestured to go when they realize you're gringo. The former is a bigger problem, I've only ever had to pay them like 2 times when it was obvious I broke a law, like driving the wrong way on a (poorly marked) street but you have to be able to call their bluff when they act threatening, something most Americans find challenging. Being polite and insistent about handing things at the station usually gets them to give up and go away but they could actually make you come to the station to pay the fine which could take all day. I recommend using gps navigation to drive through Mexico. I've heard its technically illegal but I do it anyway, most drivers there aren't following the rules. Signage is in spanish, is frequently confusing or just missing and highways sometimes end at the entrance to a city which requires several turns on city streets to reach the other side. Expect other drivers, in particular truckers to be somewhat aggressive, possibly drunk. Avoid driving through rural areas at night. There's really no go reason to be on the highway past like 9 PM.

    >Mexico/central AM is still an informal economy and an offline society. Expect places that only take cash. I agree to get a low fee debit card and take $300 out at a time and that's my weekly spending including hotels. Word of mouth is still how mexico works, if you find someone you trust to have them find you a furnished apartment or room.
    So ask around? Isn't there a common site the mexicans use?
    I can manage the spanish.

    Police interactions 'culture' for lack of a better term in mexico is so different than the US that's why american tourists are just easy marks for them. In America if you talk back to a cop you're going to lose your teeth and get 9 felonies added to your charges. In Mexico it's expected for you to argue and haggle with them on what they're claiming you did wrong. And yes a lot of the time just pretending to be a witless amerifat who can't speak spanish will have the police send you on their way because they don't want to deal with it.

    The most annoying thing with Mexico when coming at it from an orderly society/personality is Mexico's rules are whatever they feel like enforcing that day. Pay this travel tax, carry that card, talk to this official - if you go through somewhere 5 times, you will have a different experience on what they wanted or if they checked anything each of those 5 times.

    Best advice for driving in Mexico besides avoiding the one really bad narco state is make sure you do your own research on all the paperwork and insurances you need for your car before you enter the country. There's a great chance the moron doing "internal controls" won't tell you about something you need and you don't want to get stopped by a federal agent somewhere in Mexico's interior where he does actually enforce the law for whatever reason.

    >The most annoying thing with Mexico when coming at it from an orderly society/personality is Mexico's rules are whatever they feel like enforcing that day. Pay this travel tax, carry that card, talk to this official - if you go through somewhere 5 times, you will have a different experience on what they wanted or if they checked anything each of those 5 times.
    I guess I'm ok with the disorderly society thing but am I gonna have to literally give 'bribes'?

  11. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    I guess they take a picture of your car there's no human to talk to.

  12. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hope you enjoy your travel OP. My best advice as someone from Tamaulipas is just don't act dumb and you'll be alright.
    Don't act dumb being mainly out at night past 12AM on uncrowded places.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Absolutely concur. Tamaulipas is not a state to take risks or be out on the street after dark. In the daytime, even the most dangerous cartel towns like San Fernando are okay to wander about. You will get many curious stares and maybe some challenging glares, but if looks could kill, I'd have died in Mexico a long time ago.

  13. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Surf towns are typically complete sausage fests, spring breakers only want other college students, and small towns, you never know whose ex you are hitting on. Cities can good if you're young. Outside of cities, if she has fat breasts and is pretty, she's 14. If she has a 40oz Familiar in one hand and a kid in the other, she's 15 or older.
    Puerto Escondido waves will fricking kill you if you don't rip and charge. There are very good lifelong surfers who want no part of the beach there (Playa Zicatela). More women but the competition will be the worst possible - worse than ski towns.
    Maruata is a much mellower place surf wise and a much smaller town. It is in a very pretty part of Michoacan.
    Sayulita is on the tourist radar but the surf isn't as good as farther South or farther North.

    Mojitos I think are Cuban.

    Read up on Mexican driving laws. I think there are weird scenarios you have to turn on your hazards when passing or merging and if there is an accident you are liable or some shit. It's not like the USA where people pull over and insurance handles it. The cars seem to stay in the way, obstructing traffic, with the drivers arguing.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yep, wrecking is a crime in Mexico, so a wreck is a crime scene. If you have insurance, you'll be OK, but if you wreck without insurance, you might as well grab your passport and run off as fast as you can, because your ass is going to jail.
      Mexican truckers will use their left turn signal to let you know that it is safe to pass. Hazard flashers are used to let other drivers know that there is a hazard in the vicinity. High alertness at all times is an absolute necessity when driving the free roads of Mexico. The toll roads tend to be more modern and relaxing.

  14. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Looking up bajaferries.com for a Wednesday in December to Topolobampo (the shorter route) with a car - 6145 MXN
    Pichilingue to Mazatlan with a car - 7180 MXN
    I spent last winter in Guaymas, it was decayed and kinda dangerous, but still a beautiful and interesting city. Also, Magdalena de Kino in northern Sonora is a beautiful town, sometimes violent. Hermosillo is not a very appealing city, but it is sunny and warmer than Phoenix, safe enough, and the locals welcome the few American visitors who venture downtown.
    Picrel shows where you will be in deep shit if you are traveling down a Mexican highway in your car and encounter a checkpoint with hardass federales who demand to see your full paperwork. State and local police are not allowed to enforce import control laws or immigration laws, so don't give them your passport or import permit, only your driver's license. Carry a spare driver's license in case they take yours as collateral and you decide to get out of Dodge instead of following the legal requirements to pay the fine and get it back, which can take multiple days (state of Veracruz is horrible)

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Federales, the federal police, don't exist anymore. Their entire organization was abolished in 2019 for being too corrupt kek.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        True, they are called "guardia" now, short for Guardia Nacional. But Americans still call them "federales".

  15. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    What is the worst city in Mexico?
    I saw Juarez and Chihuahua, those have to be up there right?

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nuevo Laredo is probably a good place to get murdered. In general other than parts of TJ/Ensenada I'd get a full tank in the US, cross after sunrise, and be fricking gone by sunset.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      The poorer exurbs of Mexico City that are in Mexico State (Ciudad Neza, Itzapalapa, etc) and the cities that border Texas. They're just shitholes in general, dusty, hot, dirty, dangerous and full of desperate people.

      Tijuana has a high level of cartel activity and is generally chaotic but its an ok place, it has San Diego's climate after all and it isn't really dangerous to just go to the central parts of it.. An insane number of people get murdered in TJ every year but its also a much bigger city than Nuevo Laredo or Matamoros. Ensenada is

      Sorry, only relevant if you didn't get an import permit. In that case, you can kiss your car goodbye - the costs and hassle of recovering it won't be worth the car's value. AFAIK, your person won't be detained or forced to pay a fine, but you will be banned from importing another vehicle until you renew your passport.
      [...]
      [...]
      I spent over a week in Juarez centro in April 2021. It was surprisingly chill - the police didn't even carry rifles - but also kinda boring, with zero life after dark. Food was all right, kinda pricey with some cheap shitty options. Budget hotels are among the worst I have ever stayed in - smelly and dirty, 220-250 pesos per night. Chihuahua is a nice city, rather conservative, but with a great market and nice plazas which see plenty of people hanging out on a warm summer evening. I never had problems visiting Chihuahua. My hotel there was next to the prostitute street a couple blocks south of the Plaza de Armas. Owners were douchebags, but it only cost 130-190 pesos per night depending on your room.
      I also spent ten days in Nuevo Laredo in March 2021. The streets were not too safe, but nobody gave two hoots about the fact that I was the only gringo in town, except for a Honduran chick who wanted to marry me. I smoked some weed with some low-level cartel dudes and their friends in a blown-out shitbox parked on the main drag. Hotel Dos Laredos was a heckin' cool place to stay for only 230 pesos per night, you had to leave the key at reception every time you stepped out. Historic building, no A/C. Tamps state police do literally nothing but drive around. They have never given me a hard time.
      >other than parts of TJ/Ensenada
      Those are literally the most violent parts of the border. Ensenada is budget SoCal, a lot pricier than the rest of Mexico. It has a decent-looking tourist district, but it felt so dead and soulless when I visited in March 2023. Cheapest room I could find was 600 pesos per night, a dumpy motel on the boulevard.

      actually pretty nice port city and has a lot of American and mexican-american retirees.

      Nuevo Laredo is probably a good place to get murdered. In general other than parts of TJ/Ensenada I'd get a full tank in the US, cross after sunrise, and be fricking gone by sunset.

      This is what I recommend except for the returning part. Cross in the morning (be advised that some offices you might need to visit like the temporary importing one might not be open early) and put some miles between you and the border. Mexico chills out A LOT the further you go from border towns and also the way people treat you and each other tends to be much nicer. Border towns are just cutthroat places.

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