Careers that enable a traveling lifestyle

What careers would be best for enabling a lifestyle allowing you to travel regularly as opposed to the normal M-F, 9-5 routine? Notable mentions...
>Pilot
>Software Development
>E-Commerce
>Sales
>Seasonal Jobs
Recommendations, tips, general advice, or questions are all welcomed.

  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm American and strongly considering giving up ATC and becoming a pilot. The 40 hour a week, Monday to Friday slog simply doesn't appeal to me. The money is nice and easy, and I get some time off but the lifestyle doesn't click for me. It feels stale and unexciting.

    I prefer something with a lot of schedule flexibility, which Pilot's seem to have. Days on, days off, early morning flights, late evening flights, red-eye flights, generally a very flexible schedule that they bid on.

    What I would love to have is 14/14. Work for two weeks straight break, then get two weeks off. Something like that is impossible to have with ATC. The pay also caps out much lower than a pilot, who can gross 300k+ assuming you get in early enough with seniority(I'm young, so not an issue).

    Any other ATC or Pilots here with some advice? What do you recommend?

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Takes a lot to get to 1500 hours for ATP first. You want to be a CFI for a while? It’s expensive to get from 0 to 250 for commercial even and most do it in more time.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        I have the GI Bill so I won't have any expenses, assuming I go to a VA approved Part 141 College with a Flight Program and stay within their prescribed hours/limits, to put simply. I plan on becoming a CFI in order to get my hours up as that seems like the best path from what I've researched. College Flight Programs seem to get you to the ~250 hour range, then to 1500 should take roughly a little less than 2 years as a CFI, or less depending on having a R-ATP. 2 years getting an associates, then another 2 in order to get my 1250 R-ATP.

        military reservist. air national guard is the best by far but its gotten significantly more competitive these last few years.

        you'll still get to travel and do whatever you want. they don't give a shit. the benefits are so outstanding you barely need to work.

        I considered it, but no desire to continue my service. I wanted to be free from the military. Certainly a great idea for those who want to serve or continue to serve.

        Pilot for a US regional. I am senior enough to bid my schedule every month and get 7-9 days off in a row. I'm going to Europe for 8 days in a couple weeks to chill on some islands. With the benefits we have I only pay the entry taxes of the country Im flying into. Eastern europe is cheaper, around 50-70 bucks while western fees tend to be a couple hundred. Next month I'm going to go to Costa Rica, Mexico, or Belize. As the world opens up after covid my plan is to visit a new country every month but I'll probably avoid the tourist hordes in the summer. Hopefully Asia gets their shit together as I would love to go to vietnam, japan and thailand.

        Not to mention the lifestyle of a regional pilot is pretty good if you can make the best of it. Sure, some overnights are in shitholes in Arkansas or Iowa, but the good ones make up for it and if you're with a chill crew and have 15+ hour layovers we'll go out to for drinks and dinner and walk around town. All in all is pretty nice 9/10 I like it so far. 2 weeks off would be ideal but it is still awesome to be able to just go somewhere for a week.

        That sounds amazing, and basically exactly what I am looking for. I'd love to go to Costa Rica and wherever else for a week between flights and just hangout. Captain/First Officer? What are the upgrade times to Majors/Legacies looking like? As your seniority continues to go up, do you think you'll have even more flexibility with your schedule or are you at about where it would always be(For example, getting a whole 2 weeks)? Thanks for stopping in, I appreciate the info! Wishing you good luck, and have fun on that Europe trip!

        I'm very junior at an AA WO 🙁

        Not liking it? What are your thoughts?

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Not liking it? What are your thoughts?
          this sums it up

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        I have the GI Bill so I won't have any expenses, assuming I go to a VA approved Part 141 College with a Flight Program and stay within their prescribed hours/limits, to put simply. I plan on becoming a CFI in order to get my hours up as that seems like the best path from what I've researched. College Flight Programs seem to get you to the ~250 hour range, then to 1500 should take roughly a little less than 2 years as a CFI, or less depending on having a R-ATP. 2 years getting an associates, then another 2 in order to get my 1250 R-ATP.
        [...]
        I considered it, but no desire to continue my service. I wanted to be free from the military. Certainly a great idea for those who want to serve or continue to serve.
        [...]
        That sounds amazing, and basically exactly what I am looking for. I'd love to go to Costa Rica and wherever else for a week between flights and just hangout. Captain/First Officer? What are the upgrade times to Majors/Legacies looking like? As your seniority continues to go up, do you think you'll have even more flexibility with your schedule or are you at about where it would always be(For example, getting a whole 2 weeks)? Thanks for stopping in, I appreciate the info! Wishing you good luck, and have fun on that Europe trip!
        [...]
        Not liking it? What are your thoughts?

        You could also just get your commercial and multiengine then go fly in the Alaska bush. Granted you'd have to know people but you would make alot of connections as the alaskan bush usually feeds into all the majors and cargo as they reach 1500. Also granted you survive flying out there.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      good thing about pilot is that u can creampie the flight attendants

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I prefer something with a lot of schedule flexibility, which Pilot's seem to have
      You are also at the mercy of that schedule. Yes you may be doing very different schedules from one line to the next line, but you could also end up doing standby for months (sometimes having to commute to a city you hate and hold an apartment there because you are required to be no more than an hour or two from the airport when the call comes), which can be fucking misery, take it from somebody who knows. If you are willing to suffer it then sure, but don’t romanticise it.

      Also, while you bid on flights you want, in practice anything good gets claimed by more senior pilots. You will be fighting to move up from Second to First and then you want to get command as soon as possible. Each time your seniority can reset, depending on the airline. Being senior as fuck as a FO doesn’t carry over to senior with your command.

      good thing about pilot is that u can creampie the flight attendants

      Happens much, much less than you would think.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Over 250/month have left since the beginning of the year
        yeah and there are going to be lots of jobless CRJ200 drivers for Skywest in the near future once UA decides to completely can that airframe

        [...]
        Just over a year as an FO in the Mormon Air Force on the E175.

        I live in base and bid reserve cuz I'm lazy as fuck and like having time to do stuff at home. Right now the attrition at all regional airlines is insane but especially for us since we are the largest. Over 250/month have left since the beginning of the year, and the company is pushing hard and giving incentives for upgrades, but still dogshit in comparison to other regionals and/or 2nd year LCC FO pay. I have my apps in at most majors, and do not plan on upgrading here, used to be the pre-requisite was 1000 TPIC but you have Legacies taking regional FOs so I have no reason to upgrade. Plus we are due a new contract by the end of the year so my 2/3rd year pay will be a nice bump.

        Won't really get more than 8-9 days as they have to space my other off days throughout the month to allow for enough duty time of a 4 or 5 day reserve block. Retarded regulatory bullshit but whatever, I can bid and use some vacation days to get more if I want, been saving them up.

        Also, if you have the GI bill, find a 141 school that's not a part of a college program and get your ratings and start CFI as quickly as possible. It is the best time in all of history in the industry so the sooner you start building turbine time the better, took me just under 2 year just like you said to build 1500 hours as I have no degree. Yet another norm changing in the industry is the requirement for a 4 year degree, I suppose if it's all paid for and you want to get it go ahead, but DO NOT waste your time at a 141 university that space out all your ratings over 4 years. Get your certs in 9-12 months and CFI. In three years you are at a regional and can do the degree then if you feel like it, but I do not plan on it as I've seen many Captains and even a few FOs move on to the likes of Southwest without it. Barring the recession that's about to occur, the hiring should stay at this rate for the next decade.

        Pilot for a US regional. I am senior enough to bid my schedule every month and get 7-9 days off in a row. I'm going to Europe for 8 days in a couple weeks to chill on some islands. With the benefits we have I only pay the entry taxes of the country Im flying into. Eastern europe is cheaper, around 50-70 bucks while western fees tend to be a couple hundred. Next month I'm going to go to Costa Rica, Mexico, or Belize. As the world opens up after covid my plan is to visit a new country every month but I'll probably avoid the tourist hordes in the summer. Hopefully Asia gets their shit together as I would love to go to vietnam, japan and thailand.

        Not to mention the lifestyle of a regional pilot is pretty good if you can make the best of it. Sure, some overnights are in shitholes in Arkansas or Iowa, but the good ones make up for it and if you're with a chill crew and have 15+ hour layovers we'll go out to for drinks and dinner and walk around town. All in all is pretty nice 9/10 I like it so far. 2 weeks off would be ideal but it is still awesome to be able to just go somewhere for a week.

        I’m so stressed about the looming recession. The regional industry is completely fucked. I lost my job during Covid as a CFI, and I’m worried that I’m going to lose my job as an FO now, in the coming months

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Happens much, much less than you would think.
        I always thought pilots were bathing in flight attendant pussy 24/7 on layovers.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Depends on where you're working. In where I work, Flight Attendants and Pilots don't sleep in the same hotel room. There's a rumor that goes around that long ago, enraged wives got together to form a union and made it so that pilots and flight attendants weren't supposed to sleep in the same hotel. I'm not sure how true this statement is as I can't find anything on it, but noneless it's a non-issue. If a pilot wants to get to a flight attendant across the city during a layover, or is inclined to bring her over, he's going to find a way.

          • 4 months ago
            NK Anon

            >There's a rumor that goes around that long ago, enraged wives got together to form a union and made it so that pilots and flight attendants weren't supposed to sleep in the same hotel.

            lol

            There is a tradition that ship captains are allowed to bring their wives on voyage (dependent on company/union policy), my Captain did and we all hated the bored bossy bitch.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              >NK

              Hello potential future brother. Yeah I've heard that as well, and even before I became an FA I would see pilots bring families into hotels where I used to work. To be fair, they were from overseas. Honestly I've never been on a flight where our pilot brought their spouse along.

              I've heard about separate hotels too in a few airlines. So how do pilots get the pussy so easily?

              Either it's like the other anon said and it's not happening as often as one would think it is anymore, or as I already mentioned people are just being more discreet about meeting. If we're in the same city, but some odd miles away in separate hotels, an uber drive isn't going to be shit to a pilot who really wants to get to ANY pussy since they make bank. As for how it starts to begin with, that's anyone's guess: But there's a plenty of opportunities to get to know your crew throughout the flight. I've flown with crewmates who absolutely refused to go into the flight deck during bathroom breaks because they didn't want to be alone with a pilot who they felt was going to flirt with them.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >I've flown with crewmates who absolutely refused to go into the flight deck during bathroom breaks because they didn't want to be alone with a pilot who they felt was going to flirt with them.

                Wow, are pilots that flirty that flight attendents have become this afraid now?!

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Honestly? I would say it depends on the people in question. The first time I experienced it, the woman in question was or was not in a committed relationship, I can't remember. Still, despite being of an older age, she was still like fine wine and confided in me that most conversations in the flight deck ended up about her sex life, whether she was single, etc. And she just avoided going into the deck altogether because it made her uncomfortable. In her case it seemed more preemptive after a few bad experiences on her part.

                Another experience I had involved a younger woman who felt "off" about our captain after they had an exchange of dialogue. I can't remember what was said, but she felt from that point on he was coming on to her and didn't want to go in during the breaks. He wasn't the most attractive being an older dude. With that being said, karma came to bite her in the ass when a younger captain took over in the middle of our trip, and was a straight up chad in looks, apparently single. She wanted to chat him up but she couldn't get a moment alone with him to save her life.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                In your experience are most pilots like this or are these just rare examples?

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                I would definitely have to say it's more on the rare side as I've worked with pilots of all different types of temperaments. I've heard stories from coworkers of pilots who had several girls in different states. There's another I know who wasn't planning on dating, but ended up getting with a pilot who didn't give up on trying to date her. Far as my airline goes, If I'm wrong and they're being complete horndogs and coming after our female flight attendants then I don't know about it, but I'm with them more than they are so unless I'm being completely oblivious to the signs nothing's happening.

                Let me bring it all around: It's more likely that you're going to find a flight attendant trying to flirt/get digits. Especially the gay ones.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                What do flight attendent's get up to on layovers? Do they hook up with each other or better still, with crew from other airlines?

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Some like to go out during layovers. If it's a boring place we've been to a thousand times, which happens, we might just stay in our rooms.

                >Do they hook up with each other

                Sure. Happens now and again but as a man most female flight attendants will write you off as gay until proven otherwise. I wouldn't say it happens normally across airlines unless there's a special group on social media that you're chatting up first, to say nothing of the idea of whether your schedules will even match for you to do anything.The best chance you probably have of just outright meeting someone else from another airline is probably at the local bar next to your layover hotel. You still have to know how to talk with women, though, and be decent in looks just like anything else in life. My mistake several years ago was, as a hotel worker, seeing these international flight crews go out and coming back occasionally with a cute thing on their arm and thinking that could be me if I joined an airline. The job doesn't keep me from who I am inside, though.

                All this to say I don't have game like that but I managed to hook up twice, once with a chick I met during training, and then there's a FWB I'm seeing now.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Which foreign crews (if any) were easiest to get on with and sleep with?

                I love South Korean crews, they're so beautiful.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                I wish I could tell you but that's out of my depth. Those two times I've mentioned are in my own airline. I rarely meet individuals from other airlines.

                I've been in a couple of hotels where I've seen Asians in uniform but those are few and far between. Thinking of it now, I think it's more likely you're going to find foreign crews in a more major city like in California, or perhaps New York, instead of a flyover state. My experiences are not equal to someone else's however so you need to take this with a grain of salt. I'm black, somewhat awkward, and stumble into my sexual experiences. The prospects for me are not the same for a white individual.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Was being a pilot worth it anon? I’m at a bit of a crossroads in life, in my mid 20’s and have 4 options I’ve been heavily considering:

                >airline pilot (almost have my private, and was recently accepted into an airline program that pays for your CPL)
                >software dev
                >nurse
                >military (intel or cyber, mainly for the GI bill benefits after my 4 years)

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Well let's be clear, I'm not a pilot, I'm a flight attendant. Still, I'd say that being a pilot is worth it. At least from a pay perspective. They get shorter hours required to work (as of the contract of my airline). I found out that for an hour of flight time, (once again, in my airline, it's different depending where you go) a pilot was getting almost 5k to work. I found that a little suspect and dunno if it was a first officer or a captain though so take that as you will. I never went to college though so that's never going to be for me.

                You're in your mid twenties. I'm mid thirties and now have to grapple with the idea of changing airlines and starting my seniority all over again at my age so I'd say you're in a much better position than I am. I can't speak for the other three options as that's not in my experience, but I have heard that people doing military have always traveled. But if you're already on the road for piloting, there's airlines willing to hire you. AND on a program that can pay your way? Fuck yes.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            I've heard about separate hotels too in a few airlines. So how do pilots get the pussy so easily?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >pilots
      >flexibility
      Do you people actually believe planes are just Ubers you drive whenever you want? I have no fucking idea where everyone gets this retarded idea from

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is the mindset people need to take into account. It's the same for flight attendant's. The industry is all about seniority, and if you're working for a legacy carrier then you need to start coming to grips with the idea that it's going to be YEARS before you start getting what you want. Everyone who enters into an airline be it flight attendant, or pilot, is going to spend a considerable amount of time on call only to finally bid for a schedule that they MIGHT get. Someone senior to them is probably going to get it first if it's a really good trip.

        I'm not saying it's not nice to be able to travel for free but people need to lower their expectations and know what they're getting into with this lifestyle.

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Mining buddy. If your in Canada or Australia you can get a job that’s 14/14 and pays over 100k easily. I’ve been doing that and traveling all over on days off with cash to burn. Then once a year take 6 weeks and go on a bigger trip

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      How do you start?

      OP I work as a musical director on cruise ships, the pay isn’t great but I get time in port here and there and I get 4/5 month contracts with 3 month (unpaid) vacations. I would never recommend it for a career unless you get up the ladder quick, I’m trying to get assistant cruise director.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >with 3 month (unpaid) vacations
        That isn’t a vacation, you’re getting laid off.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          We are contractors, as we can only work so many months of the year.

          I wish I were laid off though, could get IE in between ships

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Just apply. If your in Canada check out some of the contractors for Fort mcmuray, clean harbours, ceda, North American, BME, graham, mikisew etc. get into a labourer position or something entry level then fan out from there to what interests you and pays a lot. If it’s Australia I don’t know on there.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Do some of them provide accommodation as well? I'm a different person to the person you were replying to but I'm trying to get a Canadian work permit through the International Experience Canada. And it'd work out quite well if I could find a entry level job that also provides accommodation, I have heard that some of the mines in Australia do this.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Just apply. If your in Canada check out some of the contractors for Fort mcmuray, clean harbours, ceda, North American, BME, graham, mikisew etc. get into a labourer position or something entry level then fan out from there to what interests you and pays a lot. If it’s Australia I don’t know on there.

            Ignore this, I imagine that if it has "camp and flights" it includes accommodation

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Also what's a Class 5 Driver’s License? I'm from the UK and have the conventional driver's license

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          How old are you and how fit are you by the way? The only job I've had that sounds similar to a mining laborer is working in a kitchen; long 10 hour days, hot cramped environment, no proper breaks

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Where do you travel to? I know in Australia a lot of the miners go to SEA where their money can go really far and the flight time is reasonable. Do you go to South America?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      I recently got an inheritance and quit my job, I'm looking into taking a few months off before I either go to some type of schooling or hop into another job. I'm older now will be 30 next year so I don't want to have to go get a bachelor to become a airline pilot so I'm not considering it. Maybe 2 years in education at most.

      Preferably want something with a lot of time off, a job that requires traveling is a plus that might not have long breaks but makes you move around a lot.

      I wouldn't mind something that makes me work half the year to 8 months with 4 to 6 months off or something with 2 weeks on 1 to 2 weeks off.

      Mining huh? Sounds interesting idk what it's like here in America but I don't think myself above blue collar work so I'll look into it.

      How do you start?

      OP I work as a musical director on cruise ships, the pay isn’t great but I get time in port here and there and I get 4/5 month contracts with 3 month (unpaid) vacations. I would never recommend it for a career unless you get up the ladder quick, I’m trying to get assistant cruise director.

      Do you know what the pay is like for the regular crew/deckhands? Maritime doesn't sound to bad, would be for people that hate being on ships though.

      What really worked for me was to take a career in OTR truck driving.

      >Easy to barrier to entry. No college degree required and companies provide training and vehicles.
      >Good pay. Doesn't take too long to buy your own rig and become an owner-operator.
      >modern sleepers have a lot of amenities to make it viable as a living space so you never have to rent an apartment or own a home.
      >Considered an undesirable job that foreigners take in Japan so, as long as you're fluent Japanese and know how to operate over there, it's easy to get hired.

      I was able to completely unfuck my life thanks to getting a job at Roehl and I regret nothing.

      I had no idea Japan would take in foreigners without degrees are there other jobs like this they take foreigners in for? I'm not entirely sure I'd want to live there but I do like visiting.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I would say commercial bfishing but if your 30 and never worked hard labor before you'll probably die

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          I've worked in construction before so I know what manual labor is like, physically I don't feel old yet.

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    I matched into psychiatry residency a few months ago
    my plan is to get licensed in five or six states and do digital consulting work from month-by-month rentals across Europe, Asia, and S. America. It would allow me to do nighttime e-consults to EDs in the states, as well as be a night-owl wherever I'm living.
    My wife and I want to do this for a few years before we have kids. Gonna be sick.
    Medical school actually opens a ton of doors for international living and mobility.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Wish I would have studied hard enough to get a real profession.

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    military reservist. air national guard is the best by far but its gotten significantly more competitive these last few years.

    you'll still get to travel and do whatever you want. they don't give a shit. the benefits are so outstanding you barely need to work.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >air national guard gotten significantly more competitive
      Care to elaborate? I'm an active duty fag whos enjoying overseas then looking to go guard so I'm not at risk of being assigned to some crime ridden flyover hellhole in ameristan. Was hoping guard will keep the good times rolling.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Oh if you're already in as active duty it won't be a problem. I just think the days of the guard taking anyone are well over.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      what are some good ways to milk military benefits if I have a nice fresh degree

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Pilot for a US regional. I am senior enough to bid my schedule every month and get 7-9 days off in a row. I'm going to Europe for 8 days in a couple weeks to chill on some islands. With the benefits we have I only pay the entry taxes of the country Im flying into. Eastern europe is cheaper, around 50-70 bucks while western fees tend to be a couple hundred. Next month I'm going to go to Costa Rica, Mexico, or Belize. As the world opens up after covid my plan is to visit a new country every month but I'll probably avoid the tourist hordes in the summer. Hopefully Asia gets their shit together as I would love to go to vietnam, japan and thailand.

    Not to mention the lifestyle of a regional pilot is pretty good if you can make the best of it. Sure, some overnights are in shitholes in Arkansas or Iowa, but the good ones make up for it and if you're with a chill crew and have 15+ hour layovers we'll go out to for drinks and dinner and walk around town. All in all is pretty nice 9/10 I like it so far. 2 weeks off would be ideal but it is still awesome to be able to just go somewhere for a week.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm very junior at an AA WO 🙁

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        I have the GI Bill so I won't have any expenses, assuming I go to a VA approved Part 141 College with a Flight Program and stay within their prescribed hours/limits, to put simply. I plan on becoming a CFI in order to get my hours up as that seems like the best path from what I've researched. College Flight Programs seem to get you to the ~250 hour range, then to 1500 should take roughly a little less than 2 years as a CFI, or less depending on having a R-ATP. 2 years getting an associates, then another 2 in order to get my 1250 R-ATP.
        [...]
        I considered it, but no desire to continue my service. I wanted to be free from the military. Certainly a great idea for those who want to serve or continue to serve.
        [...]
        That sounds amazing, and basically exactly what I am looking for. I'd love to go to Costa Rica and wherever else for a week between flights and just hangout. Captain/First Officer? What are the upgrade times to Majors/Legacies looking like? As your seniority continues to go up, do you think you'll have even more flexibility with your schedule or are you at about where it would always be(For example, getting a whole 2 weeks)? Thanks for stopping in, I appreciate the info! Wishing you good luck, and have fun on that Europe trip!
        [...]
        Not liking it? What are your thoughts?

        Just over a year as an FO in the Mormon Air Force on the E175.

        I live in base and bid reserve cuz I'm lazy as fuck and like having time to do stuff at home. Right now the attrition at all regional airlines is insane but especially for us since we are the largest. Over 250/month have left since the beginning of the year, and the company is pushing hard and giving incentives for upgrades, but still dogshit in comparison to other regionals and/or 2nd year LCC FO pay. I have my apps in at most majors, and do not plan on upgrading here, used to be the pre-requisite was 1000 TPIC but you have Legacies taking regional FOs so I have no reason to upgrade. Plus we are due a new contract by the end of the year so my 2/3rd year pay will be a nice bump.

        Won't really get more than 8-9 days as they have to space my other off days throughout the month to allow for enough duty time of a 4 or 5 day reserve block. Retarded regulatory bullshit but whatever, I can bid and use some vacation days to get more if I want, been saving them up.

        Also, if you have the GI bill, find a 141 school that's not a part of a college program and get your ratings and start CFI as quickly as possible. It is the best time in all of history in the industry so the sooner you start building turbine time the better, took me just under 2 year just like you said to build 1500 hours as I have no degree. Yet another norm changing in the industry is the requirement for a 4 year degree, I suppose if it's all paid for and you want to get it go ahead, but DO NOT waste your time at a 141 university that space out all your ratings over 4 years. Get your certs in 9-12 months and CFI. In three years you are at a regional and can do the degree then if you feel like it, but I do not plan on it as I've seen many Captains and even a few FOs move on to the likes of Southwest without it. Barring the recession that's about to occur, the hiring should stay at this rate for the next decade.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          I heard about that. Similar situation for ATC losing people. A lot of people retiring and not enough people applying.

          8-9 days still sounds great, especially if you can tack on some vacation days on the end to extend it! That's awesome! Tough to do anything longer than a few days ATC-wise because of scheduling and currency requirements, and few people would want to change it.

          For the GI Bill, the only way I can get 100% of my expenses covered by it is if I go to a VA Approved, In-State College, that has a Part 141 Program. Otherwise it would cap out at ~15k a year as they would consider it a vocational school. Getting my ratings asap is a priority like you said, which is why I was planning on going to a community/associates/two year college instead and get my ratings that way. I would still get 100% VA funding, but in 2 years instead of 4. With just 15k, I'd still have to take out some loans and I'd rather avoid student debt at all costs.

          [...]
          You could also just get your commercial and multiengine then go fly in the Alaska bush. Granted you'd have to know people but you would make alot of connections as the alaskan bush usually feeds into all the majors and cargo as they reach 1500. Also granted you survive flying out there.

          That's a good idea! I will keep that in mind when the time comes.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Over 250/month have left since the beginning of the year
          yeah and there are going to be lots of jobless CRJ200 drivers for Skywest in the near future once UA decides to completely can that airframe

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Leaf.
    >Boilermaker.
    >Make 5000/wk during the busy seasons in Spring and Fall.
    >Call it a day at 20 weeks, or more, or less, doesn't matter.
    >Spend 32 weeks doing whatever I want.

    Wala. I'm gonna spend July in the mountains and if the Leafgovt. removes it's gay restrictions Africa and Turkey for the winter.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      might be different as a burger but how did you get started? I'm going to be doing a career change from a dogshit desk job and considered welding. Heard boilermaker/pipefitter unions have decent apprenticeships and all. Really any kind of job that I work hard for a while then can fuck off for weeks without some gay middle manager calling my phone

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Oilfield.

    14/14 schedule while making good money

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nobody works 14/14 anymore. It’s 14/7. In practice, 14/5. No one should work in the oilfield unless they’re desperate for money.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Well I work a 14/14 and so do a lot of other companies we work with.

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sales works out pretty well as long as you're hitting your metrics. I work in SaaS sales and I'm currently visiting family across the country without taking PTO. Unfortunately it doesn't feel like a vacation so much as it does just working from my mom's house lol

  9. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    What about the Merchant Marines?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      what about them?
      anyone know how to go about joining in the uk?

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Italy here. I tried to join it. I know Italy is pretty much a world on its own when you try to find a iob but here's my experience

        >you must go to the nearest port authorities and ask to sign up as sailor or aspirant sailor
        >pay a fee, bring in documents about your health and a swim certificate
        >now you have 2 options: find job on a big ass ship transporting goods or a small ship transporting rich dudes around
        >option big ship is harder due to the sheer competition from oversea sailors, mainly Philippines from what I recall. They also get paid less. So I was told by some Dock workers, he told me there's little chance to work on a ship with a contract because the foreigners will accept less money for more hours of work. Also nobody speaks any known language, I tried French and English. None speaks or is willing to speak to you. They just give you the Asian stare.
        >option small ship requires special certification or experience. The former costs (skipper certification?) the other is hard to acquire unless you luck out.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Also nobody speaks any known language, I tried French and English. None speaks or is willing to speak to you

          They obviously speak both, they just didn't want to speak to you because you're not a member of the syndicate.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Doubt. I was told by fishermen most of the sailors hired to do menial tasks are the lowest rung out of their homeland. People without any education whatsoever. I thought u was being trolled because you need to speak something else from Philippinese or whatever they speak there: turns out only a few of them understand very simple words, and then bark orders at the others.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              That's how it works with all immigrant physical labor. There's ten guys who don't speak a word of the language and one guy who's at least somewhat communicative. The employer makes him the team leader, pays him extra (still peanuts compared to the locals) and then has him relay every single order to the others.
              t. Eastern Euro

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                This.

                In Ireland I was had a job full of latvians. Nobody spoke english but the latvian boss (who was also a pain in the ass)

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          yeah theres a lot of controversy with P&O ferries here, since its international waters they skip minimum wage so they get paid about £5 an hour which is ridiculously low as min wage is around £10

  10. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    The real answer is management consultant. Accumulated so many points that I haven't paid for a flight or hotel (excluding Vegas) in probably seven years now and I left consulting at the start of COVID. Still have AA EP, Delta Diamond, Hyatt Globalist, and Marriott Titanium.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ding ding ding

      Here is the right answer. I work for Bain and accumulate around a million miles per year, not counting hotel rewards. Part of my orientation years back was being told which point-earning cards would be best for the work that I do. I travel between the US, Asia, and Europe frequently, and though there are days when I have to go from the airport to a meeting and back to the airport, there are other days where I can get cheeky weekends in lovely places.

      However, I also willingly work 80 to 100-hour weeks. But the compensation is A+.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        What did you do prior to consulting? Education background? I don't think most anons would be able to break into something like this.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          I did my undergrad at Williams, had a few internships in consulting and policy work in DC, and then graduated as a policy aide within the EOP. After that, I went back to school and got my MBA and I've been with Bain for the past 7 years.

          I love the place, but I won't stay too much longer - I think I'm getting fucked on making partner and I can do better.

  11. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    I work 14/14, tons of people do. It’s the new wave nobody wants 14/7. Atleast in Canada. The work is way way way easier than anyone imagines. We’re lazy and have everyone else tricked. Rigs are tough and really feast and famine. But mining is steady. If you work 4 hours a day you’re a rockstar. Shifts are 12 hours typically

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >If you work 4 hours a day you’re a rockstar. Shifts are 12 hours typically
      What do you mean? Are you saying mining is a 12 hour job but with only 4 hours of actual work in those 12? What exactly do you do? I've been looking at entry level laborer jobs, is that what you're talking about?

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        I’m a mechanic for a subcontractor up here. That’s exactly what I mean, you’ll work a 12 hour day, lunch room for 3 ish, meetings for 1, bullshitting on the shop floor for another 4 ish plus smokes etc, then couple hours of work.

        If you get into the entry level ones make sure it becomes a ticketed trade. This boom may end at any time so it’s good to have something to fall back on in the real world

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Thanks first of all for explaining
          >ticketed trade.
          Not sure what you mean by this though, maybe make sure it's a longterm contract?
          >This boom may end at any time
          Oh yes well aware of this, maybe I could try and find work at a gold mine

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Hmm, where are you located? I can give you tips based on the country

            I mean a trade like electrician, millwright, welder or mechanic. Anything that pays good in the outside world. I see lots of people just coast through as a sampler, skilled labour or lube tech making 100k but it’s useless in the outside world

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              I'm this guy

              Also what's a Class 5 Driver’s License? I'm from the UK and have the conventional driver's license

              How old are you and how fit are you by the way? The only job I've had that sounds similar to a mining laborer is working in a kitchen; long 10 hour days, hot cramped environment, no proper breaks

              Where do you travel to? I know in Australia a lot of the miners go to SEA where their money can go really far and the flight time is reasonable. Do you go to South America?

              I'm from the UK, but could immigrate to Canada for a year with the international experience Canada program. Since I have no prior experience in mining I'd just be looking for laborer jobs

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >the UK, but could immigrate to Canada for a year with the international experience Canada program
                damn maybe i should do that too
                t.uk

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Ah yea not a bad way. Check out places like I mentioned above and just send em an email. Look at mining contractors like aecom, graham as well as labour pools. Might as well contact sons and see what they got for shift work worst they’ll say is no

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >just send em an email
                really?
                i don't have a bachelors or nothing fancy so i will try anyway i guess
                thanks

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                And what's an entry level position like? What kind of job and how's the day to day work?

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Uhhh can I get a mining job as an American?

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        I don’t know the immigration rules. Depends what your skills are. What do you do I can look into it for you

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Computers, got a degree in cyber and a couple certs, but no hard experience outside of freelance.

  12. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    not me but one of my colleagues used to be a service engineer for tetrapak. dirty ol' dutchman has fucked floozies in dozens of countries.

  13. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    is graphic design/digital marketing a good one?
    it seems easy enough and it can be done online which is the only thing that really matters
    i've also thought about supplementing that with translating on the side if i get good enough at japanese to do so

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Services are in general high in demand. I paid my first email marketer $3,000 to design & implement email flows for Klaviyo over three weeks. Digital marketing is a $150 to $300 per hour business idea. Services are easier to market than products.

  14. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Instagram model, but most of your trips would be to the Middle East.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      lol underrated post

  15. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I wish I could be a sailor

  16. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Working as a trustfund child, you get paid by your parents and you mostly have free time. You have to be there for christmas and sometimes birthdays.

  17. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Oilfield work
    20 days work, 10 days off. Company pays for housing on the 20 days. You can save money on accommodations and travel if you homeless it

  18. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Surprised no one has said diplomat i guess its not really possible for sighsee autists

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      For diplomats it really depends on the posting, some get to travel around, some are stuck in the capital city doing menial chores.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Dunno about your country but in mine you have to go through one of the toughest exams ever to be qualified for a 4 years training course so that you can finally become a diplomat.

      Then you gotta stay 2 years in your own country, then 2 years in a shithole, back for 2 years in your own country and then you get to choose a nice place to go for another 2 years and so on.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Seems like you would be in an office a lot though. And you would probably be stuck in one country.

  19. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Teachers get summers off

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Seems like it'd be stressful though

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Seems like it'd be stressful though

      if youre at one location consistently only the first couple years suck when youre getting adjusted and creating your own curriculum, after that its apparently just coasting and easy
      im a few bad life decisions away from just saying fuck it and becoming an english teacher in asia when i get a bachelors degree

  20. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Peace Corp seems like a free way to move out if youre American. I've considered it if all my other plans fail, you just need a bachelors degree and the peace corps will drop you off in some country to teach english or do a more specialized job depending on your qualifications. Your location is random but you can apply for certain areas that dont suck so much, i'd take any asian country or eastern european country on the list if it comes to that.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Don't they pay well below poverty levels as far as your stipend goes? It probably won't be a big deal if you're in a shithole where cost of living is minimal, but when your service is finished you'll end up destitute if you don't have a safety net of savings.

  21. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is being a pilot for private aviation (rich & famous) lucrative?

  22. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Software dev is probably the comfiest out the jobs you listed. If you're decent, easy to clear 200-300k with a year or two of experience, and you can work from essentially anywhere.

    I started a year ago and have been on 2 trips to europe and a going to asia in a month, all for 3 months at a time.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      200-300k remote with a year of experience?
      now i know you're bullshitting

  23. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Remote software developer seems like a good idea. That's what I'm doing. Don't have a fully remote job right now but I'm working on it.
    All you have to do is bring your laptop with you, get your shit done within a reasonable time frame, and attend your meetings.
    If you can get your stuff done early you can easily head out for a few hours without anyone noticing.

  24. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    What really worked for me was to take a career in OTR truck driving.

    >Easy to barrier to entry. No college degree required and companies provide training and vehicles.
    >Good pay. Doesn't take too long to buy your own rig and become an owner-operator.
    >modern sleepers have a lot of amenities to make it viable as a living space so you never have to rent an apartment or own a home.
    >Considered an undesirable job that foreigners take in Japan so, as long as you're fluent Japanese and know how to operate over there, it's easy to get hired.

    I was able to completely unfuck my life thanks to getting a job at Roehl and I regret nothing.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Roehl
      good company anon. most novices to the industry are not so smart, I went with May (a good company, about on the level of Roehl) and had a good time too.

      though these days you don't need to cut your teeth OTR anymore. Sysco will hire you with a $15k signing bonus no experience required, but I suppose if you really want the lifestyle OTR is still there.

  25. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >be an efl teacher they said, it'll let you travel they said
    >believe them
    >discover a world of dead end jobs at thirdie salaries, mocked and despised by locals and expats alike
    ...well fuck

  26. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is the copywriter anon in here? Tell us about that

  27. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Found myself on a mod team working aviation jobs. Most of the time its a shit hole but once in a while.

  28. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you have a college degree and live in a Western country, you should be able to find a remote position fairly easily.

  29. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >contract/travel nurse
    >work 13 weeks, make $50k
    >take rest of year off

  30. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    On my final year of studies for civil engineering, when I picked this career path I wasn’t thinking about travel opportunities like I am now. Did I fuck up?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      No because you can get a government job which is probably the second best thing to being fully remote since you get so much time off.

  31. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Journalism

  32. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Governess for a well off family
    But you need to work your way up to build a nice profile for them to choose you

    Or travel and figure it out as you go loke most people, who go and work under the table

    Or perhaps, have a trust fund and live however you want

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