Coding camp abroad

>be ESL teacher nomad
>Meet programmer nomad
>He is making 8x my wage at 2x less work
How the absolute fuck can I do this? I'm tired of being poor. Is there a coding camp in SEA, LatAm or even Africa I can go to? Must be in English. In the US these camps are like $10k+ so I feel going to somewhere like Philippines to learn coding would be cheaper.
Also how important is math? Please say it isn't. Thanks.

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In a more of less similar boat.
    >12 years ESL experience
    >Did DELTA
    >Work in teacher training, course development, academic management
    >Max out at £3k/month summer camp work or €1k/week for random teacher training projects.
    >No heart to teach full time.
    >0 passion for the field

    I eventually found a job at an ESL startup, where I smashed it. But the company was scummy and scammy. Managed to learn a fair bit about operations, marketing, tech, etc.

    Starting the long road of retraining. ESL retraining should be a general here, tbh. It's a shitty trap to fall into. I know I have skills above most of the market, but I've 0 idea of where to go from here.

    I'm simply refreshing everything I know about webdev by doing a full stack code camp on Udemy. Am using this course to develop a few side projects, so I have a portfolio.

    If you don't apply shit, it's a waste of time, and web dev is obviously the easiest place to actually apply what you're learning.

    After this, I will look on Udacity to find out which more advanced areas are 'in demand', and will try and shadow the syllabus. I think I'll be ending up going a data science route, but am also interested in web3.0 development.

    Is it actually worth dropping the dollar on an in person camp? Surely it pays off to pay for more specialist knowledge as opposed to entry level?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      12 years experience, $3K max. This is why I don't talk to esl fags you guys are losers, no offense

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      £3000 a month is a lot? That’s about what I earn after taxes as 5 years of experience software engineer after tax

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        that's less than half of what I earn with 4 years experience

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    coding camp is for connections not learning. get into hack reactor or teach yourself. look at alumni of school on linkedjn

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Teaching yourself will get you nowhere. Nobody will hire you without experience. The camp at least places you in companies as their reputation depends on it.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Also how important is math? Please say it isn't.

    It's literally all math.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why hopes and dreams, gone.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Learn maths instead of "coding" and you will have x100 more opportunities.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    My experience has been there's rarely hard prescriptive requirements outside of a degree/years of xp, you just need to be able to demonstrate you can do the job. A degree helps prevent a resume auto-discard, but I don't think a camp will help outside of teaching you the skills needed, not that that's not valuable on its own. I'm self taught and got my first job by showing off some simple gamedev tools I wrote

    >Also how important is math? Please say it isn't.

    It's literally all math.

    No it's not you dummy, for 95% of programming jobs it's 99% gluing stuff together and occasionally some basic arithmetic

    Learn maths instead of "coding" and you will have x100 more opportunities.

    Don't do this

    Teaching yourself will get you nowhere. Nobody will hire you without experience. The camp at least places you in companies as their reputation depends on it.

    This is also wrong unless the company in question has some ties with the camp

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Forgot to add, language is largely irrelevant, you can pick any c-like up in a week or two if you're comfortable with one of them. That said JS/webdev is the largest job market, but also the most saturated. You should focus on the area over the language (webdev, backend, frontend, gamedev, other more specialized stuff)

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Is there a certain "area" or language that would be best for working online or is it all about experience? I want to work as a programmer but I also dont want to go back to Canada. I like the freedom of being remote. Also cost of living in Canada is ridiculously bad right now....

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Area matters, but pick one you're interested in or it'll be a miserable life.
          Cross border international remote work is infinitely harder if you don't have work authorization in the place you're staying, not many companies will want to deal with that kind of trouble for an entry level/mid level engineer. You'll have to find a job in the destination country and get them to sponsor a visa, which is also near impossible at an entry level.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            if you have a canadian address what's stopping you from just travelling on tourist visas and working abroad from there?

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              The law

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                the worst thing that happens is I get deported from some country that can't prove I'm "working" in 99.9% of cases. While also helping their country by pouring dollars into their economy

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Being deported is unlikely (but you'll be banned from reentry possibly forever), the real concern would be the company finding out and firing you. They would be breaking tax law by not declaring your income in the place you're staying, and businesses don't like doing sketchy things like this for no gain

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                but technically I'm not "staying" there, I still live where my Canadian address even if I'm never there. as long as the work gets done and my taxes are paid to the canadian government, i see no reason as to why the company would be breaking tax law. The only issue I see are compliance standards with data, but I can tell you from working in corporate, these standards are broken everyday

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Nah. The government's never care about this unless you become retardedly obvious about it. Usually they quietly encourage it because you are taking money out of your country and bringing it into theirs. My goal is to just work remotely in the company and fuck off elsewhere while claiming to be in Canada. In fact, the programmers I already met were doing just that. Only if the employer finds out might it be a problem, the country not so much.

                Only negative is I will still have to pay Canadian taxes but on a programmers wage in a third world country? Would still be worth it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A good camp will certainly offer you placement. Why wouldn’t they? They also profit from it. Not only it helps their reputation as they advertise placement rates but they also get the equivalent of the fee that normally goes to recruitment agencies. They probably make much more money from placing you than they do from tuition. Technical recruitment is big business and the agencies charge large fees.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Let's just be honest with OP: the kind of programming he will be able to do doesn't require lots of math, as frontend and other curry monkey shit is just watching Youtube tutorials and never know what you're doing.
      But he's not aware that 2x less "work" means being 2x quicker at coming up with code on the fly. Also, making a lot of money only happens when you''re exceptionally good with people or with code, and it seems to me like he will never be good at the latter, so he'd better be fucking good with people.

      I still encourage you to get into IT, OP, it's an industry full of opportunities. But you're not getting paid well unless you're actually skilled.

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