How do you fuckers afford to travel? Do you work a 9-5 until you have enough money and then quit?

How do you fuckers afford to travel? Do you work a 9-5 until you have enough money and then quit? How would you even afford that while having to pay rent and bills? I'm thinking of doing clinical trials to fund my travels. Also, is there any point in visiting the US if I can't drive?

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why do you want to visit the US? It's expensive here and immigration treats you like a terrorist (even if you're a US citizen). You can go to places like New York without a license, but I don't know why you would come here to see a giant city.

    I can afford to travel but I have a career and no family and a lot of disposable income.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Why do you want to visit the US?
      Oregon, Alaska, Utah, cool states with cool forests and nature, shit like that.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        OP if you want to hit the national parks and explore the natural beauty of the US, renting a car is your best bet. The train system Amtrak is slow as fuck, extortionately expensive and doesnt go a lot of places. Bus travel is cheap but they don't stop at National parks and they're full of gross smelly drug addicts and mentally ill people. I'd take a look at your budget and amount of time you have to spend and narrow down which areas you want to hit and use google maps to plot how long it takes to drive between them. Most of the journeys will be a LOT longer than you think.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      For real my aunt just used the computer thing that scans some shit on her passport and just like that she was on her way, I in the other hand had to wait and then be questioned for like 30 minutes before they let me go, truly awful.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >How do you fuckers afford to travel?
    Work remotely. It means I don't get paid as much as I could if I was locked in a cubicle, but the trade-off is worth it for me.
    Remember when you were young and adults encouraged you to study at school so you could get easier and well-paying jobs when you grew up? Well, these days, if someone is leaning towards doing a desk job, they should also be encouraged to learn skills and pick a career that lets them do that job from anywhere.
    >Also, is there any point in visiting the US if I can't drive?
    Sure, certain parts at least.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Remember when you were young and adults encouraged you to study at school so you could get easier and well-paying jobs when you grew up?
      No, my mum didn't even try and stop me from dropping out of high school, wish she did though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Work remotely. It means I don't get paid as much as I could if I was locked in a cubicle, but the trade-off is worth it for me.
      This, plus investing.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Investing in what?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What do you work as?

      >Work remotely. It means I don't get paid as much as I could if I was locked in a cubicle, but the trade-off is worth it for me.
      This, plus investing.

      And what do you invest in?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Very well put!

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm a young-ish single childless male with a job that pays above minimum wage. Travel is obviously my biggest non-essential expense, but I spend next to nothing on other luxuries.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I work online and make between $6,000 and $9,000 per month. It's not a fortune, and I don't intend on doing this forever. However, for the time being, it's more than enough to live abroad indefinitely and travel more or less whenever I like.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What the fuck job do you do?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm a corporate and legal services copywriter.

        People here seem to think that copywriting pays pennies, but if you're a reasonably talented writer with a college degree and specific "niche," then you can make pretty good money doing very little work. Most of my clients pay between $100 and $200 for 1,000-page articles intended for lay audiences. Since I type about 150 words per minute and have years of experience, I don't have to do much research and can usually finish an article in an hour to an hour and a half.

        Since I almost exclusively work with legal clients, the work is relatively dull--like I said, it's not something I want to continue doing indefinitely. In all probability, I'm going to apply for law schools and graduate programs next autumn. Even if I end up working more to make less money per hour, I'd rather be doing something that I find engaging and meaningful.

        However, I do plan to retain 2-3 of my most stable clients which collectively pay about $35,000-$40,000 per year for less than 15 hours of work per week (e.g., one paid $12,000 in the last 12 months for about 3.5 hours of work per week; another pays exactly $12,000 per year for 3-4 hours of work per week; the other doesn't have a consistent assignment schedule, but probably pays around ~$15,000 per year for 4-5 hours of work per week).

        IMO, it's a pretty decent gig, but you do generally need to met the following requirements:
        >have at least a bachelor's degree (in any field, from a non-meme university)
        >have prior paid writing experience
        >have experience in a particular commercial niche (in my case law, but there's also decent money in grant writing, digital investments, B2B marketing, and medical copywriting)

        To be perfectly clear, it took me years to start earning a sustainable, respectable income doing, but that's more my own fault than anything--I just sorted of treated writing as a side-gig when I was in university.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >have prior paid writing experience
          What sort of jobs would get you this? Tryna get a work-from-home job and consider myself pretty good at writing when I wanna be. I could never get your job cause I'm a high school drop out which means I'm not allowed to go to uni in Australia, but your sort of field would be something that I would be interested in.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          As a fellow copywriter either this guy is larping or there's something he's hiding. No one's paying $200 for a 1000-word article for lay audiences. Try 5-10 cents a word. Not to mention, you'll have rounds of edits and it's pretty inconsistent work. Just doubting you found multiple stable clients at such a high rate.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            $200 for legal copyrighting doesn’t seem outside the realm of possibility.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I'm not saying that it's impossible to get $200 for an article. I'm saying there's no way he convinced clients to pay for 45 articles a month at that rate (9K). Most companies do 1 or 2 blogs a month, rarely more than 4. He'd need at least a dozen clients.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                To add to that, you might think: "But some companies blog daily." Yes, but they (1) don't assign it to 1 person and (2) don't pay the rate of 1 blog * 30 days. They'll use an existing marketing asset who gets 4K for doing socials, ads, community engagement, and then blogs on-top of that. Or they'll hire an agency to do it for $700/month.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                To add to that, you might think: "But some companies blog daily." Yes, but they (1) don't assign it to 1 person and (2) don't pay the rate of 1 blog * 30 days. They'll use an existing marketing asset who gets 4K for doing socials, ads, community engagement, and then blogs on-top of that. Or they'll hire an agency to do it for $700/month.

                I don't get paid $200 per article. Instead, I said:
                >Most of my clients pay between $100 and $200 for 1,000-page articles intended for lay audiences

                For example:
                >client 1 is a targeted blog that pays $30 per 500-word article, with each article taking 15-20 minutes to complete (I basically just re-write relevant news)
                >client 1 requires that I write and publish exactly 10 articles per week (30*10*4*12 = $14,400 per year)
                >client 2 is a personal injury law firm which pays $100 per 1,000-word article. Each article takes about an hour to write. The firm's content manager does revise and recommend edits, which usually take less than 5 minutes per article
                >client 2 assigns a minimum of three articles per week ($300x4x12 = $14,400 per year)
                >client 3 manages content for a personal injury law firm and its related asbestos litigation practice. This client pays $100 for 750-word articles, $130 for 1,000-word articles, and $200 for 1,500-2,000-word articles. These assignments usually take 1-2 hours to complete, depending on the subject and length. I am rarely asked to do any significant revisions
                >client 3 assigns 3-4 articles every week, but can assign many more, depending on my availability and their demand (since most articles pay $130, we'll use that as the average. $130x3.5x4x12 = $21,840)

                So, from these three clients, I earn--on average--about $50,640. The total writing time for these three clients is probably less than 15 hours per week. I don't keep track of revisions, because I'm ordinarily not asked to do anything beyond correct typos or insert [x] SE-optimized terms.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I have other, clients, too:
                >client 4 is a digital advertising company that works with many different companies in several different industries. I regularly write content for 4-5 different law firms, which receive anywhere from 1-6 posts per month. I usually work about ~3-4 hours for client 4, once per week
                >client 4 pays between $50 and $100 per article (I'd average this, but I just asked that they provide a YTD summary of my earnings--about $12,000 and some change)
                >client 5 is a friend's company, and this work has absolutely nothing to do with writing. I work between 1-2 hours per month and get paid $250 to click on boxes, insert digital signatures, and do basic calculations

                That's about $65,000 per year for less than 20 hours of work per week. I have other, less reliable clients who don't provide regularly scheduled work. Putting it all together, I'd estimate that I average $75,000-85,000 per year.

                In hindsight, I slightly under-exaggerated how much I work per week and slightly over-exaggerated my average monthly earnings. Realistically, I average between $5500 and $7500 per month. However, I do have months where I make ~$8,000+.

                For something I don't do full-time and don't plan to continue doing indefinitely, I'm reasonably happy.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                [...]
                I don't get paid $200 per article. Instead, I said:
                >Most of my clients pay between $100 and $200 for 1,000-page articles intended for lay audiences

                For example:
                >client 1 is a targeted blog that pays $30 per 500-word article, with each article taking 15-20 minutes to complete (I basically just re-write relevant news)
                >client 1 requires that I write and publish exactly 10 articles per week (30*10*4*12 = $14,400 per year)
                >client 2 is a personal injury law firm which pays $100 per 1,000-word article. Each article takes about an hour to write. The firm's content manager does revise and recommend edits, which usually take less than 5 minutes per article
                >client 2 assigns a minimum of three articles per week ($300x4x12 = $14,400 per year)
                >client 3 manages content for a personal injury law firm and its related asbestos litigation practice. This client pays $100 for 750-word articles, $130 for 1,000-word articles, and $200 for 1,500-2,000-word articles. These assignments usually take 1-2 hours to complete, depending on the subject and length. I am rarely asked to do any significant revisions
                >client 3 assigns 3-4 articles every week, but can assign many more, depending on my availability and their demand (since most articles pay $130, we'll use that as the average. $130x3.5x4x12 = $21,840)

                So, from these three clients, I earn--on average--about $50,640. The total writing time for these three clients is probably less than 15 hours per week. I don't keep track of revisions, because I'm ordinarily not asked to do anything beyond correct typos or insert [x] SE-optimized terms.

                Aside from this information, I don't know what else I can possibly say. As I indicated in my initial post, my biggest asset is simply that I type very, very quickly. If I didn't average 130wpm+ and have years of experience in the aforementioned fields, I'd probably be working 30-35 hours per week, if not even more.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Thanks for laying it out. So you need to be pretty advanced to achieve those results - juggling 5 clients, professional services experience, insane typing speed, etc.

                It's not realistic for the average person here asking "how can I easily make money remotely?" I'd tell them to code.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah. I wouldn’t posit it as an “easy way to make money,” either. I find the sort of legal-specific content writing I do wholly uninspiring and absolutely mind-numbing. However, it isn’t difficult and it pays well when I consider the time I put into it.

                Putting that aside, I don’t think it’s realistic for people who don’t have the qualifications and experience I mentioned in my earlier post. A lot of folks who ask questions about making money on sighsee don’t seem to have college degrees—and, at least from what I’ve seen, a college degree is effectively a prerequisite to any content writing position that doesn’t pay Bangladeshi-tier rates.

                It’s also one of those unfortunate industries where nobody wants to hire a writer who doesn’t already have experience. This is doubly true in law, where a not-insignificant number of firms either want law students or non-practising but otherwise licensed lawyers.

                (needless to say, most of these firms—as well as third-party marketing companies—pay dogshit rates while acting like they’re doing the lord’s work)

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I make 6 figures and get 25 vacation days a year.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I worked as a labourer in the mining industry. You work your ass off but you get a pretty penny. Depending on which field you go into you can pick how much time off you get as well.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      When I was in Colombia I ran into a dude that worked 6 months out of the year doing maintenance on oil refineries and spent the other 6 months living cheap in third world countries.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That sounds like an awful time.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          He seemed to be enjoying himself. Life in Canada is absurdly expensive. If you have the opportunity to leave, even temporarily, take it. I was living like a king for three months and only spent $8,000 (including air fare) - and I was a moron with my money since I stayed in AirBnBs
          the whole time - but even when you get ripped off there, it still works out to being substantially cheaper than it would be in Canada, so you eventually just stop caring.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >and I was a moron with my money since I stayed in AirBnBs
            >the whole time
            As opposed to what? Shitty hostels? I'll fork out the extra squeesh for an Airbnb if it means not having to stay in a hostel.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              You can get cheaper apartments there but they aren’t furnished. I was also staying downtown when I didn’t really need to. I hated most of the places I stayed - they were loud, moldy, and poorly constructed. The one hostel I saw was a friend’s, and she was sleeping on a bunk bed made of what looked like OSB in an unlit room with 12 other people.

              Anyways, 8 grand isn’t a lot of money for three months of living expenses. The biggest cost was rent, followed by airfare. The longer you stay, the cheaper it gets.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >The longer you stay, the cheaper it gets.
                Could you elaborate on this?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >How do you fuckers afford to travel?
      I currently live with my parents, and have no kids so I save lot of money but I only get 2 weeks worth of paid vacation time. I've been looking into careers like maritime that make you work a lot but have lot of unpaid time off in between so I can travel longer and maybe even the job itself makes me travel.

      >Also, is there any point in visiting the US if I can't drive?
      No, it's very hard to get around most of the US without a car and not every city has good taxis/transit, Uber is hit or miss around most of the US.

      You'd have to get a rental car which would probably also be expensive, or have friend that lives here and go on a road trip with him.

      How much time off on average do guys usually get? Could I work a month on and 2-4 weeks off? Not against getting my hands dirty.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >2 weeks paid vacation time
        >looking into careers that have unpaid leave

        Its incredible Americans go along so willingly with capitalism

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I agree. It's unbelievable. I've always maintained that if you want to make $$$, then the US is the way. If you want to live, move to Europe.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >If you want to live, move to Europe.
            Why live in discount Arabia when I could move to the real thing instead?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I worked for my dad and spent virtually no money 2019 to 2021. Then quit and lived in Colombia for three months. US is going to be expensive to get around in without a rental car, I wouldn’t bother.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >US is going to be expensive to get around in without a rental car, I wouldn’t bother.
      What about places like Oregon and Alaska? Those are the main two that I wanna spend time in.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I can’t even think of anything you could realistically do in Alaska without a car or money to pay for tours. Oregon has Portland which I hear has decent public transit, but it’s also a liberal hell-hole. Decent airport, though. The only three major metro areas I can think of that you wouldn’t need a car would be New York, San Francisco, and Seattle. Cabs are absurdly expensive in the developed world. I paid $50 for a 20 minute ride to an Ontario airport in the summer. Half hour in a cab in Bogotá ranges between $5 and $7. Renting a car would be necessary anywhere I can think of in the US that you might want to go.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          What about Boston? I've heard Boston has some good public transport.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I’ve never been. It’s one of the most expensive cities in the US, though.

            >Oregon has Portland which I hear has decent public transit, but it’s also a liberal hell-hole.
            I would visit Portland but I'd wanna see all over the state as well, and as for the liberals, I consider myself a centrist and both libs and dems are as easy to get along with as a child if you just agree with everything they say and go along with them, it's really not hard to get along with them if you pretend that you're one of them.

            The state is rural, Portland is the only major city in the entire state, and it’s not large - less than a million people. To be honest I would suggest LatAm or Southern Europe if you don’t drive, you won’t have a good time in America if you can’t afford cabs.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >To be honest I would suggest LatAm or Southern Europe if you don’t drive
              I fear countries where I don't know the language, I can barely handle people that speak English.
              >you won’t have a good time in America if you can’t afford cabs.
              I was planning on saving up at least 20k before going, hopefully, that should be enough for 90 days since that is how long Aussies can stay without a visa.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah a flight from Aus will be more expensive and more logistically complicated. $20,000 will be more than enough for Colombia, though. I wasn’t partying and I cooked for myself quite often but I ate at a diner every day which was reasonably affordable ($5 for a full meal).

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Boston is a glorified large town. Once you leave college, there is very little to do. I say this as someone who genuinely likes the area, as that's where I spent my formative years, from when I was 17 to when I was 22. There's not an inch of that town that don't look at and say "that's where I did so-and-so with person who's since moved on with their life."

            Nightlife sucks ass, you get NYC prices and last call is at 1:30am. The dating scene is good for the US as Boston is an educational center, so it attracts high-quality young poon from all over the country (as opposed to the fatties and single moms you generally get in more provincial American settings).

            You only go there if you're going to school or you landed a job at some biotech startup or something. People with options generally leave as it's not a very exciting place to spend one's youth. The restaurant scene is great though, for a city of that size.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >nothing to do
              >muh nightlife
              >muh drinking
              >muh cooming
              >muh goyslop

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Oregon has Portland which I hear has decent public transit, but it’s also a liberal hell-hole.
          I would visit Portland but I'd wanna see all over the state as well, and as for the liberals, I consider myself a centrist and both libs and dems are as easy to get along with as a child if you just agree with everything they say and go along with them, it's really not hard to get along with them if you pretend that you're one of them.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    first step: live in a first world country with 5-6 weeks of paid leave per year
    then add public holidays and some unpaid leave and you can easily travel for 3-4 months per year

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Do you pay rent on your place back home while travelling? How do you even save up the money to travel for that long while paying bills and rent back home?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        1. don't live in a super expensive place (living in developing country with low crime rate helps) and/or
        2. earn more money

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >earn more money
          Why didn't I think of this earlier, this is the same scenario as when I got owned by some guy on twitter the other day when he said "Get a better job" why am I such an idiot? Why didn't I just get the best job from the beginning? Why would I purposely choose a lesser job when I could just choose the best paying one?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Just from the tone of your posts you probably didn’t think of it because you are an obnoxious retard. FYI the language barrier helps but the girls can smell this on you if you don’t learn to deal with it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I did this, this year. 5 weeks of paid leave, in a few years it will be 6 weeks. Plus every month I can choose 4 days off in a block plus weekends. What I did was stack them back to back, so for example it can work out as 6 days off end of a month and 6 days off at the start of the next month, so more or less an additonal 10 to 12 days off in a row every 2 months. My only limitation is I didn't earn more money but I still visited Norway, Iceland, Mauritius, Pharos in Greece, Milan and Strassbourg. My job is the most basic job there is, zero qualification needed other than be able to lift stuff, and I have zero interest in advancing my "career". But yes, step 01 is being from a first world country.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Pray tell, what job do you have?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          bag loader

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Good to see you're alive and well, TTT anon. When is your next trip?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This is what my gf has done for our holiday. She works at a supermarket. If she can do it, anyone (in a first world country with enough paid leave) can.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I work remotely and my company lets me travel 6 months out of the year. Not sure why.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I take the 20 days of paid annual leave I have and use the money I saved in the prior 12 months. Not rocket science.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    worked out of town with free food/accom and leave all my stuff at parents place
    saved about 12k in a month and a half

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I save a lot of money with flights by using services to look for off season deals and combining that with miles. My round trip flight to Paris from LA was $470.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I work remotely and have no children

    >is there any point in visiting the US if I can't drive?
    no

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    simple,
    > tell boss I am taking a 2-3 week vacation
    > leave for said vacation
    done.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    > How do you fuckers afford to travel

    Have a decent job
    35 days off a year minimum
    5 additional days for tenure
    Ability to purchase additional days
    Flexi Time, or build up TOIL

    Pretty easy anon when you get an average of 50days annual leave to travel as you wish, and when combined across holidays you can really stretch out the time away

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You spelt it out. I'll wageslave a bit and then gtfo. I'm very frugal if necessary, so.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I was gonna say to go for it on coming to the us without a car until I read the part about wanting to see the outdoors. Public transportation in rural America is essentially nonexistent. There are a couple parks that I know of that have train stations: Glacier and Denali, but they’ll drop you at the visitor center or some shit you’ll be miles away from what ever you want to see. If you’re into taking things at a slow pace, maybe it works. Some parks in upstate New York are also accessible by public transport from NYC which is obviously a place you can get around with out a car. And the Adirondacks are underrated. You could also take the MARC train from DC to Harpers Ferry and get right on the Appalachian Trail if a long long hike appeals to you.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I am a credit card reward whore.. I open and close cards several times per year. I use those miles to find great deals and then go there. Did Japan/Korea from the US for 11 days for under $2k total spent. I also don't eat like a poor person when I travel but really dont drink much.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Have friends in the places you want to travel to for a free place to crash. Last year I spent a week in London where the expenses were food, drink, event tix, and the flight.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Europoors and thirdworlders are such bugs they don't even have the freedom to drive so they can't travel.
    LOL.

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