How do you realistically move to the EU as an American citizen? It seems like your only options are:

How do you realistically move to the EU as an American citizen? It seems like your only options are:

>Citizenship by blood
>Getting a company to sponsor you
>Marrying a local
>Don't get a visa and just leave the country whenever it's about to expire

I don't know how to do this without a massive career change

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    > I don't know how to do this without a massive career change
    That's the neat part, you don't.

    Most countries don't want random peasants which is why they have restrictions on who they allow to become permanent residents/citizens, they only want to accept productive members of society, and in some cases only productive members of certain niche industries.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Most countries don't want random peasants
      I guess biden missed the memo

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You realize that's literally what the US has ALWAYS been known for...right?

        We're one of the few countries with automatic birthright citizenship regardless of the citizenship/residency status of the parents.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Im a high skill leaf in europe and i have to jump through hoops to get my fricking work permit approved while you got Black folk and pajeets roaming the streets without papers by the metric shit ton.

      Literal migrants have more rights than any other third country national because all they have to do to enter europe is pass the initial screening by lying about their age and pretend they are younger and say they are single then technically they cannot be rejected and there is absolutely no way to tell their age for sure nor verify their identity.

      https://i.imgur.com/XBYkV6d.png

      How do you realistically move to the EU as an American citizen? It seems like your only options are:

      >Citizenship by blood
      >Getting a company to sponsor you
      >Marrying a local
      >Don't get a visa and just leave the country whenever it's about to expire

      I don't know how to do this without a massive career change

      Citizenship by blood works if you have ancestry from that country and you can actually prove it with a document. That is the most straightforward way if you have european ancestry through family. The process can be easy or very difficult depending on the country.

      Getting a job is the easiest lazy way to go to europe but also the trickiest way: You are your employer's b***h for the next 5 years or so and the minute they terminate you, you usually have 10 days to find another job or you have to leave to EU or face a huge fine and a 5 year schengen ban. Until the 5 years has passed, your employer can abuse you, underpay you, deny bonuses and frick with you in every way imaginable unless you find another employer willing to go through the trouble of filing a visa employer change for you. Then once the 5 years has passed you can apply for permanent residency and even there it will be subject to scrutiny and you'll need to learn the local language if you want to have a chance to be accepted.

      Plus you'll have to compete with all the other EU expats who behave like they own the place because they have ''freedom of movement''.

      The other plausible option is to find an EU passport holder and marry her which is difficult to do considering most EU women on dating apps are cum dumpsters who don't want anything serious to begin with.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Getting a job is the easiest lazy way to go to europe but also the trickiest way: You are your employer's b***h for the next 5 years or so and the minute they terminate you, you usually have 10 days to find another job or you have to leave to EU or face a huge fine and a 5 year schengen ban. Until the 5 years has passed, your employer can abuse you, underpay you, deny bonuses and frick with you in every way imaginable unless you find another employer willing to go through the trouble of filing a visa employer change for you. Then once the 5 years has passed you can apply for permanent residency and even there it will be subject to scrutiny and you'll need to learn the local language if you want to have a chance to be accepted.

        Damn that sounds stressful... thanks for the info though.

        >Citizenship by blood works if you have ancestry from that country and you can actually prove it with a document. That is the most straightforward way if you have european ancestry through family
        >The process can be easy or very difficult depending on the country.
        I'm hoping Italy is on the easier side of things because Greece absolutely is not

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Italy is relatively easy but they push on documentation so you need to go prepared and prove that you have italian ancestry. The processing time can be long but it's doable.

          if you don't mind me asking, which industry are you in?

          Financial crime/compliance

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Financial crime/compliance
            is that with one of the accounting big 4?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            > Italy is relatively easy but they push on documentation so you need to go prepared and prove that you have italian ancestry. The processing time can be long but it's doable.
            A nice feature of the Italian system is that there’s a special residency category for people in the process of waiting for their citizenship to be approved—a friend of mine recently went through it, and while it took almost a year and cost a lot of lawyer money (his case was slightly complicated by the fact that his birth father, who was an Italian citizen, was not listed on his birth certificate, as his mom was by the time of his birth already married to someone else), he lived in Milan the whole time he was waiting for his Italian passport, on some kind of “citizenship pending” residence permit or visa.

            But the process is indeed relatively straightforward if you can prove direct descent from a legal Italian citizen, even several generations back.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        if you don't mind me asking, which industry are you in?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You can also enroll in school. It doesn't have to be a university afaik, just some trade school for like 2 years will do. Ours are cheaper than the US ones, albeit more expensive than eg. Asian schools.

        You're a migrant, too.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          So are all the french fricks being given visas like happy meal toys to come ''study'' and ''work'' in Canada and pay local tuition instead of international tuition. The opposite however still requires us to jump through hoops to get approved and we still have to pay international tuition.

          Migrant or not the state of affairs of EU immigration laws is moronic. The same can be said about Canada letting all of india come in without a job.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have citizenship by blood, stay out lmao
    You aren't chosen by fate

    But if you are into fraud or charming enough, you can get residency without marriage in some countries by proving a relationship and living together, maybe that way you would know the local language and not be useless drain to society

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I have citizenship by blood
      the silly part is I should but the Greek government is incompetent and won't process it. lol

      You have all the realistic options in your first post. Another that you haven’t mentioned is getting a student visa (generally very easy) and earning a degree from an EU university; France, the Netherlands, and at least a couple of others have pathways to longer-term residence for recent local graduates.

      But the most common path for Americans working in the EU is to get a job. If the “massive career change” that such a move might require seems implausible, the EU probably doesn’t need you.

      >If the “massive career change” that such a move might require seems implausible
      it's not implausible just have to wait years longer than I wanted since I'm in a good field but young

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >the silly part is I should but the Greek government is incompetent and won't process it. lol

        I feel you

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >the silly part is I should but the Greek government is incompetent and won't process it.
        You need to involve a lawyer which in those countries is really like a fixer who is networked into the right people and knows who to pay off.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >You need to involve a lawyer which in those countries is really like a fixer who is networked into the right people and knows who to pay off
          My family is friends with a lawyer and I figure that's the only way. They are looking for a bribe or just don't don't want to do the work. I was told that the city "Doesn't have paperwork going back far enough" to prove my grandfather was born there. LOL

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >the silly part is I should but the Greek government is incompetent and won't process it. lol

        When a Greek gives birth to a child abroad he is supposed to declare it to a Greek embassy or consulate. I was born in the USA to two parents who were born in Greece, but they didn’t declare it. So I can get Greek citizenship but it’d be work and I’d need to gather papers and do lots of running around.

        When my dad died in Greece my uncle wanted me to try to save his portion of our land holding and house from the bank as he owed money and the bank took it technically upon his death. Our incompetent lawyer in Patras wanted me to get Greek citizenship to transfer those holdings to my name before my dad died. It was a total nightmare, they wanted so much paperwork and running around and I had to go to Athens to do it.

        If you’re in the USA I’d consult this firm and just contact them and see much they would charge. They specialize in providing legal and other services on behalf of diaspora Greeks.
        >https://www.icsgr.com/

        Or just contact the nearest Greek consulate/embassy.

        Seriously if you really are born to ethnic Greek parents why are you whining on futaba board full of anime and video game addicts? Do you expect any good advice from such dregs?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Seriously if you really are born to ethnic Greek parents
          my grandfather was greek. so my situation is a bit different. they literally told me that they don't have any records from his birth year (1920s) anymore. Soviet tier record keeping. I'll have a lawyer look at it but even more pressing is the government won't release an inheritance to my mother without some serious paperwork either.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Or just contact the nearest Greek consulate/embassy.
          trust me I've already been down that route. I even flew to the city to try to get my grandfather's records but they did not have it they said

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >residency without marriage in some countries by proving a relationship and living together
      I know one girl I could maybe rope into this scheme but I'd rather do everything legally. Also, I would plan to learn the language completely of course

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That is legally

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          then why mention fraud

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Having lots of money can get you some indefinite investor visas

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You have all the realistic options in your first post. Another that you haven’t mentioned is getting a student visa (generally very easy) and earning a degree from an EU university; France, the Netherlands, and at least a couple of others have pathways to longer-term residence for recent local graduates.

    But the most common path for Americans working in the EU is to get a job. If the “massive career change” that such a move might require seems implausible, the EU probably doesn’t need you.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Another that you haven’t mentioned is getting a student visa (generally very easy) and earning a degree from an EU university; France, the Netherlands, and at least a couple of others have pathways to longer-term residence for recent local graduates
      That's not a bad idea. Does this apply to something like Business School? I already have my undergrad

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Does this apply to something like Business School?
        I don’t know for sure and rather doubt there’s a direct path, but business school should at least be a place to network for jobs. So I can imagine it as a shortcut to finding a company that would sponsor you.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Get Irish citizenship through your grandparents like I did

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Comfy

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Sadly not Irish. But will pursue Italian now, I may be able to get jure sanguinis plus I speak the language alright

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Italian might be good. Irish is nice because they probably have the most streamlined process of getting citizenship. They aren't completely inept like some countries either

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      My grandmother had Irish citizenship this way, but was American. Can I get Irish citizenship through her?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You may be able too honestly. Not sure my grandpa and grandma on my dad side were born there

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yes if she was a citizen before you were born

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I wish I could. Both sides of my family came over before the 1800s.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        So you're not Irish then kek, no shit you wouldn't get citizenship

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          My ancestors built this country from nothing. Your's were merely looking for an escape because they couldn't do crop rotation. The famine ruined your genes worse than they already were. You're a fricking disgrace of a man.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I'm NTA so you can keep stamping your feet mutt. Figures you'd be grasping at someone else's culture since you don't have any.
            >1800
            They were the Mexicans of the day. They were absolute the lowest of low if they left them lmao

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Not quite. My ancestors went West and raised cattle on a 10 thousand acre plot of land not just before it was a state, but a territory.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Ancestors were so low class they went to America for gibs
                >Built this country that's was giving them gibs
                mutts like you deserve the Mexicans flowing in, you're the same thing

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What gibs? They weren't given that land for free. They had to fight for it.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >My ancestors built this country from nothing
            you just said they came over in the 1800s moron. they Hispanic family looking for another citizenship of course

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Best bet at this point would be to find a country that lets you apply for citizenship after X years of residency and go pay your dues there. Probably not too bad since you can hop on the train to visit places on the weekend.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Buy an apartment in the UK and one anywhere in Europe and split the two, 90 days in each. Ireland doesn't count if you're buying in the UK because of a common-area rule. Never have to deal with immigration paperwork, but be careful not to overstay in the Schengen Zone. So stay 92 days in UK and 89ish in Europe.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds like a fair enough idea. gonna save up money, get a few raises and play it this way if I can't think of a better play.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's what I've been doing for a few years now. I want to change my European country because I need to fly there from the UK and I dread airports and spending a whole day traveling. I'm looking into a train or ferry from the UK. Maybe France.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone know much about starting a business in Italy? Looks like it doesn't take much to set up a little hostel in a cheap village, call it a business and move there that way.
    Side question - anyone here ran a hostel?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Italy is one of the worst "rich" countries to own a business, this is well documented.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        What constitutes "worst"
        Seems like anything in hospitality has good ROI there, low startup cost, low recurring cost (rent and labor are cheap). Regulations might be bad but I'd be surprised if they're as bad as immigration laws

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It's a very inefficient country, not just that the government is inefficient, but it seems to permeate all sectors of society, i.e. a bank transaction takes an hour, management approval, and a ton of paperwork for no particular reason.

          The private sector is bad, but the government is much worse. Just look into what it takes to renew a residency permit there as a foreigner, multiple trips and appointments at different offices that can turn into an all day affair (of mostly waiting) and paying different fees and purchasing tax stamps for your documents (like its still 1850). Starting a business is much more complicated as there's lots of permits from different agencies to be obtained (which all require multiple interlocking steps).

          It's not impossible but the amount of bullshit inherent to Italy is thought to be one of the reasons the country lags behind the rest of Europe in GDP growth. And it says something about Italian culture, that it's very "crab in bucket," that people are resentful of other's success so these restrictions are put in place to inhibit the ability of certain people to prosper.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Bureaucracy, paperwork, clusterfrick to open and maintain a bank account, monthly tax filings or you will get raped with fines and harassed by the government and also the mafia depending on what sector your business is in and where.

          The north is more efficient but a lot more expensive.

          The south still lives in the 1930s so nothing is efficient and corruption/mafia presence is worse.

          Avoid Milan or you'll just waste what ever profit you make in rent, moronic government fees and other expenses just to live in a city that doesn't feel like Italy to begin with, and is also full of migrants.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I heard once (and it could be bullshit) that if you have more than 3 employees they must have union representation of some kind. Probably not true exactly but might have come from a true thing... if that makes sense.

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