I love cheese, recommend me places with great cheeses

I love cheese, recommend me places with great cheeses

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    France is the number 1 country for cheese (Italy is close second), from mountain cheese to soft cheeses, to entire meals of cheese (fondue savoyarde, raclette, mont dore...).

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Italy is by far the best country for cheese. France is definitely better for wine and bread but with cheese they lose big time.
      also it is pretty cheap unlike Switzerland.
      here we have mozzarella, stracchino, caprino, parmigiano, gorgonzola, caciocavallo, pecorino along with regional DOPs and weird stuff like the infamous Sardinian casu marzu (cheese with living maggots)

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >casu marzu (cheese with living maggots)
        >the cheese is outlawed in the European Union and other jurisdictions.
        how into?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Living in Switzerland, I will always offer Swiss dairy products an enthusiastic shout out. It’s true that French cheese is a lot bigger and a little more diverse, but the Swiss market is far better and varied than outsiders would guess. And the best stuff doesn’t get exported.

    All that said, either Italy or France offers a better bang and experience for the tourist buck than we do.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Where in switzerland should I go for kino cheese experience?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I had a fondue in one of those hotels in murren that face the Eiger. That was based

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Where in switzerland should I go for kino cheese experience?
        Virtually any Alpine village should have something local available that is worth stuffing your face with. The village of Evolène, in Canton Valais, is a place where I personally have eaten three absurdly local cheeses in the same day—one from Evolène itself, one from each of the two closest villages down the valley. They all tasted completely different but were from within ~10km.

        And although they sound (and arguably are) kind of stupid, local cheese festivals that towns and cantons throw on behalf of their local cheesemakers’ associations do bring out some heavy hitters. As do farmers’ markets anywhere in the country.

        If you like the stuff with holes in it, you want the Emmental, a valley in Canton Bern that is also nice for hiking. The local specialty Emmentaler variety of cheese is the prototype for what Americans and other Anglos think of as “Swiss cheese.” Canton Vaud, adjacent to Geneva, is in my opinion especially good at soft cheeses called tommes, which are somewhat similar to Brie. And my personal favorite semi-hard cheeses are what get grouped together as “Bündner Bergkäse,” or “Graubünden Mountain Cheese,” from the canton of Graubünden (AKA Grisons or Grisciun(s)) in the Southeast.

        I don’t know much about the cheeses of Ticino, the Italian-speaking canton, but I seem to remember them being good at sheep cheeses.

        Oh, and the town of Gruyères, in Fribourg, has a famous cheese named after it and is quite charming.

        But the shortest of answers is that any expensive cheese marked as local will be worth spending the money.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You can travel around but else you can find a well assorted cheese store like pic related that are everywhere around Switzerland.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous
        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I am going to eat every single piece of cheese in this store. Let me be clear: I did not say 'I am going to eat a frickload of cheese from this store.' I am going to eat every single piece of cheese in this store.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I hope your next visit to Switzerland is fewer than 72 hours long, because if you try to do that more than once you're pretty likely to die.

            If you've just got a short layover in Zuerich, you should also be able to get a decent cheese or two from a vending machine; I've used the one at the Zuerich main train station once and was satisfied. The pickles weren't worth it, though, and I've never tried the vending-machine sausage: https://www.alpomat.ch/121/standorte

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You can easily go to the store in

              https://i.imgur.com/Nr1FKb1.jpeg

              You can travel around but else you can find a well assorted cheese store like pic related that are everywhere around Switzerland.

              if you have a layover in ZRH for 4 hours or more.
              If you're fine with another dairy store, you'll find something closer to the airport for sure.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                This it's in Stäfa about 40min from the Airport.
                In the city the cheese selection of Jelmoli (department store near the main station) it's located in the food are on floor -1.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/nZiPcbC.jpeg

          [...]
          [...]
          [...]
          Never mind casu marzu, Sardinia has some of the best hard cheeses I had anywhere. Sardinian pecorino is absolutely incredible.

          https://i.imgur.com/gBrpsMS.jpeg

          I love cheese, recommend me places with great cheeses

          How expensive is the cheese? Heaps more than imported in US/AUS

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Heaps more than imported in US/AUS
            Why would you expect cheese bought locally to be more expensive than imported?

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              The gruyere they sell at wallmart for $7 for 6 oz would be sold like for $3.10 non tax in switzerland. But those are AOP. But Wisconsin gruyere is even more expensive.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >How expensive is the cheese? Heaps more than imported in US/AUS
            It’s going to vary a lot. But just to give you one example, I bought this piece of cheese a few minutes ago at the supermarket. So it’s not the fanciest cheese in the country, but it’s organic, and it’s from the more expensive/better supermarket cheese counter (prepackaged/sealed stuff is cheaper), and it’s really good. 144g, or just a little over five ounces, for CHF4.45, or US$4.86.

            You can spend less or more.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >And the best stuff doesn’t get exported.
      the myth was always that the best stuff gets exported and the rest stays in the country

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >the myth was always that the best stuff gets exported and the rest stays in the country
        That concept is absolutely logical, but I don’t know if I buy that when it comes to cheese—I think cheese exporters out of Switzerland are dominated by larger-scale, more mass-market producers, the kinds of outfits that make supermarket cheese (having said that, supermarket cheese here is also a lot better than the global average).

        There’s still a lot of stuff made by smug, fancy-pants artisanal producers here that has never been intended to go beyond the local market.

        I will say that I have never tasted an Emmentaler literally anywhere outside of Switzerland that wasn’t inferior to the stuff sold in-country. But I should qualify that and confess that I don’t really love Emmentaler.

        A similar dynamic may exist in Swiss wine, or so my wino friends have suggested—although Switzerland produces a little bit of very fine wine, almost none is exported, and it’s all consumed domestically. So I imagine that what little makes it out of the country is probably extremely expensive, and hopefully good enough to deserve the premium. But cheese is less durable/more perishable than wine.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    S tier - France, Italy, Switzerland
    A tier - Georgia, UK, Spain, Netherlands
    B tier - Germany, the Balkans, Nordics
    C tier - other Slavic countries, India
    D tier - USA

    Cursed tier - south Korea

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nobody believes it but it's low-key Japan

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Japan has never heard of cheese. Next time I visit, I'm bringing a block of cheese to wow the natives.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The supermarket.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the uk produces more different regional cheeses than france
    our sparkling wine is better than champagne too
    get fricked froggies

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Doubt

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I will buy that there is world-class cheese to be found in the UK; you can get a little bit of semi-fancy English, and I think also Welsh, cheese in Swiss supermarkets, and the Swiss don’t frick around with bad cheese (except for a few shitty local processed-cheese products, which I assume are for small children). And I know you make some kind of rancid blue cheese that people seek out from afar—Stilton, maybe? I don’t like blue cheeses myself, and my wife favors the French or Italian ones when she’s looking for moldy cheese.

      But your post is literally the first time I’ve ever heard of British wine, bubbly or otherwise. I would have assumed England wasn’t warm and sunny enough for viticulture. I don’t like sparkling wine, either, tbh, but again my wife does. Are there specific producers to look for?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        there are a number of vineyards in the south coast areas of england that are well regarded. the weather tends to be a bit better down here, and the soil is more suitable for viniculture.
        for a number of years english sparkling wine from these areas has regularly beaten other european sparkling wines including champagne in blind taste tests. see pic related for an example. although this is unfortunately from the daily fail, it was the first search result, and the results are also the same when conducted by specialist wine magazines and so on.
        of course the french don't like this idea but then they still don't like the outcome of the famous "judgement of paris" when it was shown that american wines from napa county, California are basically better than french wine in most cases
        have a look at the list here https://www.waitrosecellar.com/champagne-and-sparkling/type/english-sparkling-wine and look out for ones from somerset, dorset, hampshire, kent as these are the counties along the south coast of england (note that the area named in the pic is kent which is famous for its arable produce and is nicknamed the garden of england)

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, I lived in California for a long time, and it was sort of hilarious to see the French snobs gradually have to concede that yes, there are New World wines at least as good as those from the old country. Same is true of a lot of the South American, Australian, and South African wines nowadays, too, of course, so I assume it’s only a matter of time for the UK to join the “I told you so” club.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    anyone ever try the maggot cheese of sardinia/europe?
    is it like moonshine culture, the hillbillies do it but only share it when they know you're cool?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casu_martzu

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Good friend of mine, an urbanite Sardinian who spent a couple of summers among shepherds when he was a student, has eaten it; I’m not clear on how hard it is to find, although it is officially illegal.

      I can’t say it sounds appealing to me. I’ve eaten the odd larva or insect, but only cooked. I’ve never felt tempted to eat anything alive.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Italy is by far the best country for cheese. France is definitely better for wine and bread but with cheese they lose big time.
      also it is pretty cheap unlike Switzerland.
      here we have mozzarella, stracchino, caprino, parmigiano, gorgonzola, caciocavallo, pecorino along with regional DOPs and weird stuff like the infamous Sardinian casu marzu (cheese with living maggots)

      >casu marzu (cheese with living maggots)
      >the cheese is outlawed in the European Union and other jurisdictions.
      how into?

      I travelled in a van Europe for a couple of months and I love cheese. My country tier is

      1- France
      Before thinking anything exclusive/expensive, my first shock was stopping at a regular big ass carrefour and explore the entire variety of options. Its the literal cliche of kid in a candy store. I was there for about an hour. Before bragging of any secret super expensive cheese, an Alsatian goat cheese bought at carrefour changed my life, seriously

      France is #1 but at the same time you will feel overwhelmed knowing that you will only be able to scratch 0.1% of the options. Every town/market has an unforgettable, unique cheese

      2- Switzerland
      Why are contrarians ranting against fondue?? My experience was as genuine as you could get: Got hosted by a couchsurfer in the swiss italian part and we went to a friends' chalet for a fondue. You can dip the bread in some spirit and get drunk while eating it, it also enhances the flavour. The supermarkets have a good selection, but is a bit more expensive that the eurozone

      3- Spain
      CTRL+f= 0, wtf?? Yes, cafes and tapas are boringly consolidated around Manchego varieties, but with a little prodding you will find amazing options. Also because the country is a bit cheaper I was able to spend in more award-winning cheeses. Torta de Casar (Extremadura) and Savel (Galicia) are extraordinary

      4- Italy
      To praise some countries means that others will not be that good. Of course it could be just a case of me being unlucky with my cheese selections when I was there, but Italy was not up there with the rest. I do need to go to Sardinia and try Casu Marzu

      5- UK
      Didnt make it to England, but they have to be mentioned as they are so undeservedly ignored when it comes to cheese

      Never mind casu marzu, Sardinia has some of the best hard cheeses I had anywhere. Sardinian pecorino is absolutely incredible.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Swiss fondue is terrible. Honestly, Swiss food in general is terrible. The correct answer is definitely France.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Swiss fondue is terrible.
      A matter of personal preference, but I don’t like it much either. Raclette is the superior national dish based primarily on melted cheese.
      >Honestly, Swiss food in general is terrible.
      True facts, and I say that as a local. The dairy products (including cheese) and fine chocolate are among the world’s best, but the cuisine will never be a global or even regional contender. The best meals in Switzerland are overpriced renditions of the culinary heritage of our neighbors.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Only whites are lactose tolerant in general so it's pretty much just Europe for cheese

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Woodman's. they have a really good black pepper gruyere

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I travelled in a van Europe for a couple of months and I love cheese. My country tier is

    1- France
    Before thinking anything exclusive/expensive, my first shock was stopping at a regular big ass carrefour and explore the entire variety of options. Its the literal cliche of kid in a candy store. I was there for about an hour. Before bragging of any secret super expensive cheese, an Alsatian goat cheese bought at carrefour changed my life, seriously

    France is #1 but at the same time you will feel overwhelmed knowing that you will only be able to scratch 0.1% of the options. Every town/market has an unforgettable, unique cheese

    2- Switzerland
    Why are contrarians ranting against fondue?? My experience was as genuine as you could get: Got hosted by a couchsurfer in the swiss italian part and we went to a friends' chalet for a fondue. You can dip the bread in some spirit and get drunk while eating it, it also enhances the flavour. The supermarkets have a good selection, but is a bit more expensive that the eurozone

    3- Spain
    CTRL+f= 0, wtf?? Yes, cafes and tapas are boringly consolidated around Manchego varieties, but with a little prodding you will find amazing options. Also because the country is a bit cheaper I was able to spend in more award-winning cheeses. Torta de Casar (Extremadura) and Savel (Galicia) are extraordinary

    4- Italy
    To praise some countries means that others will not be that good. Of course it could be just a case of me being unlucky with my cheese selections when I was there, but Italy was not up there with the rest. I do need to go to Sardinia and try Casu Marzu

    5- UK
    Didnt make it to England, but they have to be mentioned as they are so undeservedly ignored when it comes to cheese

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    UK produces good cheese but like all things the natives neglect their own culture and so there's no really culture *around* cheese
    by that I mean plenty places will sell good produce but theres nowhere really to go and enjoy local cheese in a restaurant/cafe/bistro type setting like you would in france or italy
    same way there are some amazing brit foods and recipes but you won't find many places preparing more than about five generic ones with the same processed ingredients

    so yeah, try british cheese but don't go there expecting to experience their 'cheese culture' iykwim (except for the cheese rolling down the hill which is cool)

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      you just need to get out and about a bit
      example, pic related is a farm shop near where i live. but it is on the outskirts of a small village
      they have a separate cheese room. there is some imported cheese in the picture (i can see a rocquefort and cashel blue is from ireland) but most of the cheese on display is british cheese. mostly english but wales makes some good cheese too
      the orangey one at the bottom is shropshire blue, one of our finest. absolutely superb on toast.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Wisconsin, the state is made of cheese.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Wisconsin, the state is made of cheese.
      I believe you’re thinking of the moon.

      (In all seriousness, I do like fresh, squeaky cheese curds, even if they don’t taste like much.)

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