Is there any way to protect against radation exposure while flying?

I don't want cancer

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Chill out, anon. If you live long enough you're going to get cancer anyway. It might not be the thing that kills you, but if it isn't it will be a close second.

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Surely you don't fly as much as flight attendants, right?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      No, but radiation is accumulative.

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    There is no way to avoid radiation period, hell to be able to type and see this you are exposing to ~radiation~. Yes it is increased during flight but it's so negligible you'd basically need to debate it against working outside in the sun vs. airline pilots.

    Can't wait for it to come out that Flight Attendant Suk Yu Hawd did the following
    >smoker for 30 years
    >plastic surgery out the ass
    >alternative medicines/chemicals and treatments to look young
    >all this shut down her weak immune system
    >also flew a while so obv radiation duh

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >north pole route
      you get cooked with radiation. ever touch the windows at 40k feet? you'll literally burn your hand

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      When normies say radiation what they mean is radiation high enough in frequency to ionize and cause cumulative damage or alpha/beta particle "radiation" (not real radiation), regardless of the fact that literally all quanta is technically radiation, because that information doesn't really help. Visible light and lower energy than that radiation used by phones is literally irrelevant and incomparable to xrays/gamma exposure or even uv, no amount of 5.2ghz or visible light is going to affect you, it's not simply a matter of slower accumulation, it doesn't pass the minimum threshold to interact on the atomic level in the same way. Regardless, the biggest worry for a consumer should be the gay xray thing they do to pretend theyre fighting terrorism, that actually does cause a lot of cumulative harm and I try to avoid it and instead get manually searched/just skip it, don't want my more important tissue developing constant dna damage because of some gays at the tsa

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Santa's Short cut is a normal route, anyone traveling from NA to Europe or Asia most likely has taken it.

    I was actually flying it yesterday, it's a fairly common route to take.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Radiation is 5x higher at the poles

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Which doesn't mean shit because it's still quite negligible. Besides every airline out there has a max hours of flying time for various reasons including this, your body can easily recover from the insanely small doses that you get when working at these altitudes and conditions.

        This person would have had to need their immune system shot/failing already for the low amounts of radiation to adversely effect them in this manor.

        No, but radiation is accumulative.

        Radiation also cycles out of the body naturally, otherwise everyone would be doomed to seeing sunshine and we would be molemen. Radiation isn't THAT big even in aircraft, pilots who get the highest dosage due to being in the windows of the cockpit rarely register that much higher than your normal person.

        Pic related, this person most definitely had other issues but a dumb headline and "well it can't be ruled out" by some doctor spawning this

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          The effects/damage to your DNA is cumulative. Any damage that isn't repaird, gets replicated. eventually you get cancer

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            The thing is that airline employees have a maximum number of time spent in the air and depending on the region of airspace that they are allowed to fly in per month/year. Basically anyone flying in the past 30 years has adhered to this as it is a known thing in the industry that you are subject to higher levels of radiation during work. Shit cycles out naturally through waste in the body along with tons of shit the body does to destroy fucked shit. Yes there is a possibility of cancer but what doesn't have a possibility of increasing it?

            Doing some digging on the article this person had spent 32 years flying, developed cancer, and died. The only thing linking these two together was a "known occupational hazard" of increased radiation, but seeing that she's had 32 years of service before exiting for health it's fair to say she was also up in age. I'm sure it didn't help that she was working in a condition of increased radiation exposure but everything on the internet articles I can find just point out this as a rare case(which it is).

            It sucks that it happens but it's quite negligible and easy to deal with assuming you 1) don't live in the sky 2) listen to the maximum flight times allowed 3) have any kind of immune system. The majority of the planet will never need to worry about this.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Any damage that isn't repaird
            Thats a big thing to just toss in there anon. Your DNA does get repaired

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            You actually get cancer about 5 times every minute, but your body repairs the damage and kills the cancer cells.

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    IMO the risk is real but you probably have to work on an airplane for it to be worth considering

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Actual medical physicist here. You don't need to worry about solar radiation on airplanes. If you take about 1 million long haul flights in your lifetime that gives you a 5% chance to get cancer from the extra radiation. To answer your question: you can shield yourself if you wear a lead suit.

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Your body is adapted to live in an environment with a constant background radiation, as is all life on earth. Don't worry about it.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      your body is adapted to live on the ground. Not 37,000 feet in the stratosphere.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        maybe yours isn't, altitudelet

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          No one is. You’re not a special snowflake

Your email address will not be published.