Maldives, Sri Lanka, and India in July

Me and the wife will have a 3-4 weeks off in July-early August so we decided to finally go visit/meet her family in Maldives. I would like to turn the trip into a Addu City to New Delhi trip. We are planning on 10-12 days in Maldives visiting various islands and family but after that we do not have a clue where to go. We both find historical (any recommendations for colonial architecture would be appreciated) and nature (she particularly loves mountains and waterfalls) settings interesting. We also just enjoy walking around cities and getting lost in them when we travel. Any suggestions for Sri Lanka and India? The only must see so far is Taj Mahal and that is in Agra. Budget is around 3-4k, we are beginning our trip out of Singapore and we will likely depart Maldives from Mále. Is that enough or should we be uping the budget? Not looking for luxury but do not want to slum it either.

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  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Its not worth it including Sri Lanka if you only have ~2 and a half weeks.

    I think you made this thread before and I recommended Meghalaya. Combine that with Kolkata for all the colonial architecture you could wish for. After the obligatory Taj trip, you can spend any time you have left in Darjeeling or Sikkim.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      here is a pic I took on my last trip to kolkata

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/iWKAPDr.jpg

      here is a pic I took on my last trip to kolkata

      I haven't made this thread before. Why skip Sri lanka? Kolkata sounds interesting and based on photos so does Meghalaya. Anything you'd recommend doing while there? Whats in Darjeeling and Sikkim? I take skip Delhi outside of flight home? The photo you posted looks really cool btw. Whtgp2ngat building is it?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Not him, but I spent the last several years in Kolkata. It isn't the most exciting city in India but has its own distinctive culture. Overall, it's a lot calmer than other big Indian cities, and there isn't nearly as much hassle there as in the north. Unless you're staying in Sudder Street, you probably won't get hassled by many touts or con artists. Most people are pretty laid-back and friendly.

        If you drink and want to socialize with locals, I'd recommend Broadway in Bowbazar and Tripty's in Bhowanipore. Broadway is a colonial-era establishment. Not a very social crowd, but the prices are low and the building is pretty. Tripty's is in a crowded market, and the entrance is a total pain in the ass to locate if you're not familiar with the area. However, it's very popular among students and has a lot of "regular" patrons who are very friendly. Dirt-cheap--if you're traveling with a woman--then you can only sit in the AC section (women not allowed in the larger, non-AC area). Avoid popular bars like OlyPub on Park Street, unless you like getting hassled by tip-hungry waiters.

        Park Street has a lot of shops and bars, South Kolkata is a bit more affluent and has a lot of up-and-coming cafes, pubs, and restaurants. Dum Dum and the northern neighborhoods are some of the most densely-populated districts in the entire world, but could be fun to walk around if you have nothing better to do. Howrah is a dump and you don't need to visit unless you're going to the train station.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >Darjeeling
          Darjeeling is a typical "hill station." It has fairly pleasant temperatures year-round but can get a bit wet and chilly in the winter. There are some national parks nearby, and you can get excellent views of Kanchenjunga and the Himalayas when the sky is clear. You can also visit the zoo and ride the Darjeeling Toy Train, but you should book in advance if you want to ride the train.

          >Sikkim
          I've only been once and can't remember much about it. Very, very different culture from the rest of India. People look more Asiatic than typically Indian, there's a strong Buddhist influence, and lots and lots of monasteries. There are some absolutely gorgeous lakes, too, but you need to apply for a permit if you're not Indian.

          In fact, you need to apply for a permit just to visit Sikkim, but you can do it online and just have to "check in" with the regional authorities once you cross the border from West Bengal. This permit lets you visit Gangtok and surrounding areas, but you need additional permissions to travel any farther.

          This is all pretty basic advice, feel free to ask any more specific questions about Kolkata.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      What are the best places in India if you like more jungle/tropical places?

      You might have responded to another thread of mine, I was looking at going to Kerala and Meghalaya. Anywhere else I should consider? Probably only looking at 2 weeks but i do very intense vacations, so I can fit a month of stuff in if travel time isnt a huge issue. Im fine with flying instead of bus/train.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Aside from those two, India is mostly subtropical. There are the Andaman islands. If dry forests are okay you could go to any of the tiger reserves, or Kaziranga if you want to see Rhinos. There are also the Sundarbans but I didnt see any wildlife there when I went.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Sri Lanka

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Based Indiaboo anon
    I think you've finally convinced me to go to Kolkata.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Not him, but I spent the last several years in Kolkata. It isn't the most exciting city in India but has its own distinctive culture. Overall, it's a lot calmer than other big Indian cities, and there isn't nearly as much hassle there as in the north. Unless you're staying in Sudder Street, you probably won't get hassled by many touts or con artists. Most people are pretty laid-back and friendly.

      If you drink and want to socialize with locals, I'd recommend Broadway in Bowbazar and Tripty's in Bhowanipore. Broadway is a colonial-era establishment. Not a very social crowd, but the prices are low and the building is pretty. Tripty's is in a crowded market, and the entrance is a total pain in the ass to locate if you're not familiar with the area. However, it's very popular among students and has a lot of "regular" patrons who are very friendly. Dirt-cheap--if you're traveling with a woman--then you can only sit in the AC section (women not allowed in the larger, non-AC area). Avoid popular bars like OlyPub on Park Street, unless you like getting hassled by tip-hungry waiters.

      Park Street has a lot of shops and bars, South Kolkata is a bit more affluent and has a lot of up-and-coming cafes, pubs, and restaurants. Dum Dum and the northern neighborhoods are some of the most densely-populated districts in the entire world, but could be fun to walk around if you have nothing better to do. Howrah is a dump and you don't need to visit unless you're going to the train station.

      if you are gonna go to kolkata, go during durga pujo.

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    is there any place in india that isn't sweltering fricking hot?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      ever heard of the himalayas

  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Would you guys recommend going there at the end of July? I have a two week vacation and have no clue where to go outside of Europe because it's either winter or rain season everywhere else. I don't mind if it's not hot, but I don't want to spend two weeks in the rain

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      End of July will be during the monsoon. It'll be fairly hot and very, very humid. If the monsoon is even modestly strong, there'll be heavy rains almost every day.

      However, the rain isn't non-stop: the clouds will usually accumulate through morning and early afternoon, and then open up later in the afternoon or evening. You typically know when it's about to start raining, because the wind will pick up and the temperature will drop. IMHO, it's quite comforting (at least after you've adjusted to the initial "temperature shock").

      Based Indiaboo anon
      I think you've finally convinced me to go to Kolkata.

      I lived there and found it intensely boring, but it's worth checking out if you're in the region.

      [...]
      if you are gonna go to kolkata, go during durga pujo.

      Durga Pujo is definitely interesting, but man--it makes every day life a total fricking b***h. My wife's family lives near one of the most popular parts of South Kolkata for Durga Puija, took us 1 hour and 30 minutes to walk to her friend's house, which is ordinarily an 8 minute walk away lol

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