Moving for a couple of years after college

My country (Quebec) is a decent place to live, but a lot of the time, I can't stand the cultural mindset of a lot of my people, a village mindset. Canada's economy is also going down the drain, worst of the G7 in the long run, even worse than the UK or Italy. Some of our best leaders have been worldly people who travelled around and then made this country better when they came back.

Montreal's a nice city, but I'd like to work elsewhere when I graduate. I posted the flag of California, but I'm really thinking about any american city where I don't need to drive, or a few places in Europe.
Anywhere in France or french Belgium would probably work for me.
Spain: Depends, I know a fair bit of spanish, I can read and watch TV but my conversational skills declined, I should have laerned portuguese instead.
Brazil would be a place for me, although in terms of economic opportunities...Same thing with Iran and the geopolitical situation.
London Bristol and Manchester seem like the best places in the UK and I could get the Youth Employment Scheme, I'm already looking for housing prices.
Istanbul, Italy and Croatia could be options if I'm willing to learn another language.

My main issue is employement, especially if it concerns the US. I have to get an intership or get hired by a firm to get the visa to stay for a while, and they're very strict on foreign workers unlike here, same with Europe.

Any tips to get hired by a foreign company? I'm finishing my degree in political science and have language skills. I have experience in tourism and research. But somehow, I don't find much work, all the while one of my closest friends is going to do an intership with the government in New Delhi. I'm pretty jealous of her, she travels a lot, and I have, mainly in the US (I have a relative there) and I feel like I'm squandering opportunities.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >My closest friends
    >Doing an internship with the government of New Delhi
    Why don't you go back to India and build a life there? Western countries are going down the drain anyways, there's nowhere to go. They're all shitholes.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I meant for the canadian government in New Delhi. If I was Indian I'd probably want to go to Canada, rather than leave it.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The only reliable way to do this in the U.S. is with a student visa for graduate school. By the way, if you got to America and aren’t interested in a specific area, like the Old West or Florida or whatever, just go to California, Texas, or New York.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What about Philadelphia? I could go to the Miami area too, or the Beltway. I've already been to DC and Northern Virginia, it's a nice area. Denver looks like a cool town. I am interested in area with more atypical nature, like the west and the south.

      As for California, I'm mainly looking at the southern coast, from Santa Barbara to San Diego.

      My relative lives in Baltimore/Delaware but there isn't anything to do there in terms of opportunities for me.

      Kek
      [...]
      Been living in QC for a very long time and there is not better way to describe quebecois as village people. Most of them never left the province other than to go to Cuba and have 0 interest in any media other than their own. I think I never had an intelligent conversation with one of them. I only hang out with anglos and immigrants.

      Yeah, there's that mindset here, it's what I want to leave, people are judgmental and will talk in your back. You should still make efforts or leave though. In places like the big coastal cities, there's just a more relaxed attitude. We seem liberal on the outside, but were actually pretty conservative in our way of life.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Im originally from baltimore and you couldnt pay me to live there again. I live in the south now and its much better.

        Out of all the places youve named imo san diego is the best and Philadelphia and Baltimore are the worst.

        >American city you dont need to drive

        LOL you have like three options

        New York
        Chicago
        Washington D.C

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Well I don't seek to live in Baltimore. I could give New York a try, but my question is how easy is it to get an H1B visa? Should I just try TN even if the options are more limited?

          >I can't stand the cultural mindset of a lot of my people, a village mindset
          Totally get what you mean, I’m so fricking sick of the villager mindset of here. I dread visiting my extended family. They’re like 14th century serfs who know nothing outside their village. I think this is the problem with French Canadians, we want to know nothing of the outside world in the slightest. It’s a good and bad thing.

          And we don't like chicane, as we say, we shy away from the important questions in favor of constant consensus.

          Don't bother moving to America if you don't want to drive a car. Also don't move here because we're full. Seriously if you value high taxes free healthcare, cusses, and cops with a monopoly on violence then just go to europe.

          I'm considering Europe, but outside of maybe going for postgrad, how do I get a work visa for Europe? France and Spain seem to be doing well and I don't have a language barrier. I'm woke so I don't really care about the politics, they still have culture. I could study in Brussels with an EU program, my ticket to leave this place. London seems to be easy to get a visa to as a canadian, but is it worth it?

          But again, I don't know if I'll get an offer with just a bachelor.

          I actually live in Philadelphia and have lived here for about 5 years. Philadelphia has some big pros but a lot of cons. If you want the big walkable city thing at a cheaper price, you’re better off in Chicago if I’m being totally objective.

          Honestly, just go to New York, Washington, D.C., Florida, Texas, or California. They’re the only places that are showing any signs of life, and have young people doing things, making money all that good stuff. If you don’t believe me, look up the median ages, population loss statistics, social mobility of these other places. You won’t even have to get past seeing that the median ages are late 40s and 50s to see that I’m right about this. If you have a real penchant for nature or the American West or something, Utah, Colorado, places like that are obviously options but the city life is not as vital as in the places I mentioned. I really wouldn’t even bother looking anywhere else. Go wherever you think you can make money, man. If you can make some wealth in this country, and let’s be honest, what other reason would there be for you to be here, then you can just recon various parts of the U.S. when you’re ready to plan roots and choose then. But in the meantime, go where the vitality is and where the money is flowing and that’s really only like 5 or 6 places.

          The US has more of a future economically than Canada, and healthcare is only a problem if you're uninsured sadly. France still has probably the best healthcare in the world. I would just be part of the canadian brain drain to the US which ebbs and flows.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Is it even possible to afford New York?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I actually live in Philadelphia and have lived here for about 5 years. Philadelphia has some big pros but a lot of cons. If you want the big walkable city thing at a cheaper price, you’re better off in Chicago if I’m being totally objective.

        Honestly, just go to New York, Washington, D.C., Florida, Texas, or California. They’re the only places that are showing any signs of life, and have young people doing things, making money all that good stuff. If you don’t believe me, look up the median ages, population loss statistics, social mobility of these other places. You won’t even have to get past seeing that the median ages are late 40s and 50s to see that I’m right about this. If you have a real penchant for nature or the American West or something, Utah, Colorado, places like that are obviously options but the city life is not as vital as in the places I mentioned. I really wouldn’t even bother looking anywhere else. Go wherever you think you can make money, man. If you can make some wealth in this country, and let’s be honest, what other reason would there be for you to be here, then you can just recon various parts of the U.S. when you’re ready to plan roots and choose then. But in the meantime, go where the vitality is and where the money is flowing and that’s really only like 5 or 6 places.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >american city where I don't need to drive
    Does such a place exist? Maybe NYC? Not sure that's up your alley though.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      NYC, Chicago, Boston, Cambridge, Washington, Arlington, Alexandria, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Jersey City, Newark, San Francisco, Miami, Charleston, and their suburbs as well as about half of college towns

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Depends if you consider a bike + bus viable. I lived in Phoenix for 8 years simply had a e-bike and would use the bus on/off during summer depending on the weather. Completely doable if you aren't appose to living near your job. Many jobs here are still hybrid and companies will actually offer for tax breaks people to not drive.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >My country (quebec)

    have a nice day, not even reading the rest of your post, maybe dont lose two referendums if you want to be referred to as a country

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Kek

      https://i.imgur.com/bbzw6qz.png

      My country (Quebec) is a decent place to live, but a lot of the time, I can't stand the cultural mindset of a lot of my people, a village mindset. Canada's economy is also going down the drain, worst of the G7 in the long run, even worse than the UK or Italy. Some of our best leaders have been worldly people who travelled around and then made this country better when they came back.

      Montreal's a nice city, but I'd like to work elsewhere when I graduate. I posted the flag of California, but I'm really thinking about any american city where I don't need to drive, or a few places in Europe.
      Anywhere in France or french Belgium would probably work for me.
      Spain: Depends, I know a fair bit of spanish, I can read and watch TV but my conversational skills declined, I should have laerned portuguese instead.
      Brazil would be a place for me, although in terms of economic opportunities...Same thing with Iran and the geopolitical situation.
      London Bristol and Manchester seem like the best places in the UK and I could get the Youth Employment Scheme, I'm already looking for housing prices.
      Istanbul, Italy and Croatia could be options if I'm willing to learn another language.

      My main issue is employement, especially if it concerns the US. I have to get an intership or get hired by a firm to get the visa to stay for a while, and they're very strict on foreign workers unlike here, same with Europe.

      Any tips to get hired by a foreign company? I'm finishing my degree in political science and have language skills. I have experience in tourism and research. But somehow, I don't find much work, all the while one of my closest friends is going to do an intership with the government in New Delhi. I'm pretty jealous of her, she travels a lot, and I have, mainly in the US (I have a relative there) and I feel like I'm squandering opportunities.

      Been living in QC for a very long time and there is not better way to describe quebecois as village people. Most of them never left the province other than to go to Cuba and have 0 interest in any media other than their own. I think I never had an intelligent conversation with one of them. I only hang out with anglos and immigrants.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not my fault, making sure we don't lose the third one or I'm ditching this place for a while.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm essentially trying to see what are the criteria that make firms decide to recruits foreigners instead of locals outside of the pay.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Don't bother moving to America if you don't want to drive a car. Also don't move here because we're full. Seriously if you value high taxes free healthcare, cusses, and cops with a monopoly on violence then just go to europe.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I always see move to a good country in Europe but WHAT European country is actually GOOD to live in?

      Scandinavia
      >Cold, unfriendly, woke, depressing
      UK, France, Germany, Holland
      >They see Canada as a major quality of life improvement, so it would be a downgrade going there.
      Eastern Europe
      >Have fun making 2k/yr (and now open borders so no longer possible to larp as based)
      Southern Europe
      >Employment lmfao what's that

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The netherlands may be actually the best place to live. High wages(relatively...), easy language, weather kinda ok, very hot girls that know how to frick, close to everywhere important, your rights are actually respected and lax, easy credit on good terms, police with balls and culture. The minus is it's very small, flat, many immigrants, incredibly expensive real estate and it's the heart of drug trafficking.

        I'd argue that Italy and Rome specifically is even better, but you have to find a good job. It's not even that hard, you just have to put in some work and not be so negative.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >I can't stand the cultural mindset of a lot of my people, a village mindset
    Totally get what you mean, I’m so fricking sick of the villager mindset of here. I dread visiting my extended family. They’re like 14th century serfs who know nothing outside their village. I think this is the problem with French Canadians, we want to know nothing of the outside world in the slightest. It’s a good and bad thing.

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