REMOTE places on Earth

What are the most remote, isolated places on the Earth you have visited? How long? Did you enjoy?

  1. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lom Sak/Khao Kho. I saw no more than 5 white people the entire two weeks I was there.

  2. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    point nemo
    the gift shop was rubbish tho

  3. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    What you recommend in Seoul?
    Best places to get some fine Korean girls.

  4. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    New Zealand is your answer, you cannot get more remote than that and there are no predatory animals so you can just hide in the mountains, mild winters.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Tasmania too, a remote island at the edge of the world

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      New Zealand isn't remote, I live here. It's just a normal country.

  5. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Iskateley, Nenets Autonomous Okrug. Pretty cool stuff.

  6. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Some remote tribes in Australia. I was hitchhiking when a local nurse picked me up on her way there. Went through rural places in India and saw kids that seemingly never saw white people befire. There are also various places in SE asia that have rarely ever been visited by foreigners - bring some drawing utensils and medicine if you decide to go there

  7. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I live in a globohomo megacity and like getting into remote places as a contrast

    > Greenland
    If you like arctic stuff like icebergs, musk oxen and isolation then this place delivers. Any roasties with you will be most upset by how the inuit treat sled dogs like the tools they are instead of pets. I was there for just under a week which I felt was enough. Moving between settlements is difficult - I would seriously consider getting a cruise here instead of flights if you can find one with an agreeable itinerary.

    > Faroe Islands
    Another Danish dependency. Far smaller than Greenland but you can get around the isles easily and there are no ice caps in the way. I spent a fortnight there which was maybe a couple of days too long. Plenty of nice day hikes. If you are into birds time your visit so you can be surrounded by puffins on Mykines. Make a point of visiting the less visited islands.

    > Svalbard
    Starkly beautiful, was here for 5 days which was enough. Polar bears are a real danger here, you can as a tourist hire firearms with the right paperwork but I wimped out and paid for guided visits.

    One of my friends has been to Jan Mayen and I'm supremely jealous. I'm saving up cash for a cruise that takes in a bunch of South Atlantic islands and Antarctica

  8. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    My brother just got back to the US from La Laguna, Cauca, Colombia. I highly don’t recommend going there or even near there unless you know someone.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      well, go on

      I live and work in Antarctica. I am not the only poster on SighSee who does. There's also a guy on SighSee who's with the BAS, but as far as I know the posters here are with the USAP.

      Obviously its as remote as it gets but it certianly does not feel isolating. Socially it is much better than the real world in many, many ways.

      incalculably based. are you there year-round?
      >Socially it is much better than the real world in many, many ways.
      I suppose this is to some extent in the eye of the beholder, but what I've heard boils down to binge drinking and promiscuity with a 3:1 male-female ratio, which doesn't sound that great to me senpai.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        It’s very remote and basically there are commie rebels in the jungle and along the roads, there are coca crops being protected there by cartel. It is one of the “Do not travel” places from basically every first world country government. If you know people there they can go around and tell the bad guys not to kill or kidnap you. If you just showed up as some random white guy it would be super dangerous.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Colombian here and agreeing that rural Cauca is as dangerous as you can go in that shit hole. Well done

      >including being the first American to cross the Tumen-Namyang North Korea/China land border
      I doubt that unless you are an oldfag.

      I would say the opposite, they only started opening the land border in the last decade

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Americano in Cauca. They said he was like the first American there in 30 years. Some French guy was there for some reason 10 years ago.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          Why visit La Laguna specifically? I used to live in Popayan but never strayed that far off the beaten path.

  9. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    somewhere around 66.8750556, -146.2346460, I think

  10. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I live and work in Antarctica. I am not the only poster on SighSee who does. There's also a guy on SighSee who's with the BAS, but as far as I know the posters here are with the USAP.

    Obviously its as remote as it gets but it certianly does not feel isolating. Socially it is much better than the real world in many, many ways.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Socially it is much better than the real world
      Is it true what they say about the biblical level of fucking that goes on at the research stations there?

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Sup bitch email me back.

      >Socially it is much better than the real world
      Is it true what they say about the biblical level of fucking that goes on at the research stations there?

      Yes. There's a lot of desperation though, even moreso than on a military deployment. Gotta be chadish either personality or physically if you want to get lucky unless you're going to bang some hairy snatch fat leftist hoe.

      well, go on

      [...]
      incalculably based. are you there year-round?
      >Socially it is much better than the real world in many, many ways.
      I suppose this is to some extent in the eye of the beholder, but what I've heard boils down to binge drinking and promiscuity with a 3:1 male-female ratio, which doesn't sound that great to me senpai.

      Nah, it's not that. What is saying is that because there's not the distraction of smart phones so you get to know a lot of people through social interactions and the fact everyone live in dorms and (most) eat in the galley.

      And a few people do a year round stint there. It's not that common, and USAP will deny (most) people from doing more than a year. The gal I was with there did a summer-winter-summer deployment but she was the head of one of the important sections there so she was given a waiver to pull that off.

      https://i.imgur.com/kuuU7C6.jpg

      What are the most remote, isolated places on the Earth you have visited? How long? Did you enjoy?

      OP the most remote place I've been is the village of Khinaliq in Azerbaijan. They didn't have a road connecting it to the rest of the country until like ten years ago. The people there have been isolated for thousands of years and have a language entirely unique to them which doesn't stem from any other language so it's popular with linguistic researchers.
      Pic related

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Oops should have said most remote besides Antarctica, I'm just retarded

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        I read a couple of years ago that the internet was really slow there, is it still true? I have the opportunity to do half a year in Antarctica but if there's no internet I'd rather choose another destination.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          When I was there (2021-2022) it was slower than AOL dial up. I guess they were trying starlink this past season but it's no longer there or something. The other ~~*Antarctica*~~ poster (who needs to holler back at his boy still) could answer better.

  11. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Marquesas some month
    Best place to go when ww3 will start

  12. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Nord, Greenland.
    The northern most manned outpost on earth. It's where the Danish send out patrols with sled dogs to assert sovereignty.

    Just a few huts and an airstrip on the coast. Flew in on a C-130 from Thule, and then off to the Arctic ice pack via a three engine turboprop converted DC-3.

    On the ice, though, I only got within 48 miles of the pole. Weather hampered a helicoptered meet n greet with the US Navy. sub at the pole.

  13. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone been to Dokdo/Takeshima/Liancourt Rock? Is it worth the trip?

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's literally just a random rock in the ocean that Koreans are super autistic about. Their entire national identity revolves around defending it from Japan to the death.

      Japanese, just like everyone else on earth, have no clue that the island exists, can't point it out on a map, don't care, and never have. It's also not really remote since it's full of absolute swarms of Korean tourists who visit to desperately attempt to send a message to Japan.

  14. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I’d like to go to Antarctica one day as a pilot. Don’t think it’ll happen, but still.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Join the New York Air National Guard if you really want to fly down there.

  15. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Gobi Desert, Mongolia
    It's a desert. Not very exciting unless you like bumpy rides and getting stones in your shoes

    >Svalbard
    Touristy, but pretty cool. A friend worked as a guide so got some free trips

    >Arkhangelsk
    My Uncle threw a weeding party there. Actually a really cool place. Cool people, easy to get drunk. Much better than Murmansk and those run down Kola peninsula hell holes.

  16. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    nunavut
    3 months
    it was good. a little bit enlightening. a lot boring.

  17. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Anaktuvuk Pass, Alaska
    Solo hiked for four days down a valley. No humans around, got some nice snowfall despite it being summer. Awesome.
    >Wakhan Corridor, Afghanistan
    Still inhabited, but no roads leading up to the actual Wakhan valley, pretty much so cut off from the rest of the world, hiked the length of the valley in two weeks.
    >Lake Baikal, Siberia
    Went hiking/ice skating across the lake twice. Once you leave Olkhon or Listvyanka behind you, there's nothing. The world is reduced to very few colours too, there's no colours other than white, grey, black and blue other than your own gear. Except for sunrise or sunset, which can pretty amazing, somethings with garish hues, sometimes with subtle pastel tinges.

    Also been to some remote-ish corners of Iceland, Central Asia, Greece and visited oodles of small villages all over Africa, but I wouldn't call those remote, even if contact with the outside world is limited in these places and they see very few tourists.

  18. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I always wanted to travel along the northern coast of Russia, can it be done?

  19. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Couple times both to Easter Island and Galapagos, each trip by scientific research vessel.

    Lots of random and remote locations on the ocean, such as sending instruments down into the Mariana Trench. Few times to Antarctica.

    10 times into North Korea, including being the first American to cross the Tumen-Namyang North Korea/China land border.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >including being the first American to cross the Tumen-Namyang North Korea/China land border
      I doubt that unless you are an oldfag.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        >oldfag

        I'm a legendary oldfag - I was a North Korean guide and one of the part owners of Young Pioneer Tours back in the early 2010's

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          > I was a North Korean guide and one of the part owners of Young Pioneer Tours back in the early 2010's
          How'd you get started doing it? What was dealing with the government officials in starting the whole thing like?

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            I planed and was group leader for two custom DPRK trips with Koryo Tours in 2011 and 2012. On those trips I met the YPT guys and ended going with them to Iran, with Gareth (the founder) and I doing some further travel leaving Iran and crossing into Armenia together for some tour route development - after that I was part of the team.

            For the most part you deal with your KITC (Korean International Tourism Company) guide/counterparts. I had my own favorite guide, Miss Yu, who I enjoyed working trips with but I didn't always get her assigned to my group. Overall no big deal, the main goal for all concerned was to have a successful trip with the happy and satisfied guests, and for the North Koreans getting good tips and gifts. Miss Yu introduced me as a friend to a customs official at the Pyongyang Airport, so It was pretty cool to get jump the line VIP treatment on arrival with my groups, of course gift bottles of whiskey helped with that too.

            There was some minor cloak and dagger stuff involved in it all, having back door access into the Beijing North Korean embassy to pick up the travel permits and having our contact give us packages to bring across the border in the Rason SEZ.

            • 8 months ago
              Anonymous

              We're gonna need more Miss You pics, hombre

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                >We're gonna need more Miss You pics, hombre

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous
              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous
              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                Nice... So how far you were able to go?

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                I got a lot further in a back hallway with one of the lamb BBQ waitresses, but so did a couple other guides which was a bit of let down on that achievement....

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                Lmao I appreciate the honesty. Do you think either Ms Yu or the waitresses were either spies reporting back on any actions you made or they were trying to get a husband to GTFO NK?

                The third, last alternative would be that even in fucking Juche North Korea there are roasties who are gonna roast which makes it way more hilarious/depressing

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Do you think either Ms Yu or the waitresses were either spies

                No, they were in the tourism industry which was basically a state business to bring in hard currency. I'm sure Miss Yu had to make reports and I'm sure there were plenty of reports on me through my work there. Miss Yu was a good friend and I never tried anything with her. I didn't know If I would see her on trips in, just a pleasant surprise when I would get to Pyongyang and find her waiting for my trip at the airport. We would often talk about her love life, efforts to find a good boyfriend, and other everyday aspects of living in North Korea. I know her father was very high ranking and powerful, I think she had been to Malaysia, and probably would have the ability to find a duty assignment international if she had wanted. She liked tourism because she had easy access to western films so she could be familiar with English, and of course the goodies. She still had to go off on yearly ideological work/study retreats with her co-workers in the off season, which was something she didn't really enjoy.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                >The third, last alternative would be that even in fucking Juche North Korea there are roasties who are gonna roast which makes it way more hilarious/depressing

                The waitress was with the Lamb BBQ restaurant which would also cater picnics at the nature parks near Pyongyang. Those girls were on duty to show a good time with singing, dancing, and being flirty. I had danced with the girl on my first trip at a very beer heavy lunch at an ultimate firsbee tournament, and on my second trip where after another beer heavy lunch she surprised me with an on the lips kiss as everyone was getting pictures with the girls and heading to the bus. I thought it was pretty damn crazy, but then I heard she had done it to two other guides. I think I saw her one other trip and she did not kiss me but I did get some hugs and a little bit of a hand hold. She was one of my favorites and I brought her a foreign makeup kit as a gift but she wasn't working on my following visits. The girls said she was pregnant, but I really worry she had gotten herself in some trouble - obviously she had a strong sex drive and I hope she is OK and busy keeping her man satisfied and not shipped off to some camp.

                I'm not going to post a photo of her/us, instead here is one of Miss Yu at the ultimate frisbee BBQ first trip.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                Not him but I suspect its similar to how East Germany operated. There are many levels. On the bottom you have people who are rewarded or coerced to inform or submit reports on others. Next up there are people who as part of their official duties, are expected to submit reports on others. The tour guides probably lie here. Above them are the actual intelligence agents.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'm him, the DPRK guide, and I think thats a good summery of how it works

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        he is a legend on this board and used to be a guide to NK. shared lots of photos here, so fuck you homosexual

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        >he doesn't know about based NK tour poster
        newfag detected
        He's one of the best posters on the board. Same with the white anon who moved to India and actually posts good advice. I bet you weren't even here for the KoK debacle (full name now filtered because of it)

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >including being the first American to cross the Tumen-Namyang North Korea/China land border
      I doubt that unless you are an oldfag.

      >oldfag

      I'm a legendary oldfag - I was a North Korean guide and one of the part owners of Young Pioneer Tours back in the early 2010's

      Colombian here and agreeing that rural Cauca is as dangerous as you can go in that shit hole. Well done

      [...]
      I would say the opposite, they only started opening the land border in the last decade

      >I would say the opposite, they only started opening the land border in the last decade

      Here I am making the crossing...

  20. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    This was in 2012 but the most remote place I've ever been to is Niue. My only motivation why I went there is to find out if they were really using currency with Pokemon in it. They didn't, but there are plenty of cool things I experienced there.

    >There was only 1 flight per week to/from Auckland so basically there were very few tourists. I also had my first handwritten boarding pass when I left Niue.
    >I met their premier Toke Talagi on the first day and even invited me to their dinner party of some sort. I also found out that the place I'm staying at was his childhood home.
    >The waters of Niue is, by far, the clearest blue I've ever seen. Limu Pools is a great place to snorkel. I even swam with dolphins which was absolute kino.
    >Niue is absolutely unique as it doesn't give off a beachy vibe unlike other Pacific islands. Yes there are beaches, but the caves and rock formations are worth seeing & are virtually untouched thanks to few tourists.
    >Prices, however, aren't that cheap. Expect the prices in groceries & restaurants like the ones you see in Aus/NZ.
    >There are many Flips here surprisingly.
    I haven't traveled to Polynesia since then after this trip. Polynesia is super underrated so I hope to explore more soon. (eyeing on Tonga currently)

  21. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've been to Johnston Atoll. There were five of us with no resupply for six months on a 1 square mile island, 750 miles from anything else. Towards the end of those six months I felt very ready to get back to civilization, but it only took a few days before I was longing to go back.

    Also spent a week on Isla de Navarino doing the Dientes and Wulaia hikes. Only really remote in terms of latitude though with a big city right across the channel.

    Pic is the SW corner of Johnston. Just beyond the trees to the left there were a few hundred thousand nesting sooty terns.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      isn't that place full of radiation and chemical weapons? how do you even get there?

  22. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    The most geographically isolated of all the places I've been would be the Azores, splat bang in the middle of the Atlantic ocean, but not very difficult to get to. Spent 10 days on São Miguel, which was a bit too much for just the one island, I want to go back there and island hop to the other eight. It's one of the most beautiful places I've been to, honestly.

    These "off the beaten track" places that probably don't see a whole lot of white people aren't as remote, but harder to visit
    >Ma'an, Jordan
    Small desert town, me and a mate went because the Jordanian 5 dinar bill showed a picture of the "Ma'an Palace". It was hardly a palace, but a fun adventure regardless. We later learned the town is something of an Islamist hotspot.
    >Umm Qays, Jordan
    Roman ruins in the far north of Jordan, you can see Lake Tiberias and the Golan Heights from there. Took several hours to get there with public transport, going back I was super lucky as I just happened to exit the ruins when the bus arrived. Jordanian buses don't run by timetables, so I was prepared to just wait for a few hours until it showed up.
    >South Lebanon
    As a foreigner, if you want to go further south than Tyre, you need a permit that's not necessarily easy to get from the military administration in Sidon. I befriended a Lebanese girl who lived down there, she talked us past the guards. We drove along the Israeli border, which was mostly just a fence, I had expected more concrete walls. Quite surreal to see the Israeli settlements just across the border. Also saw Mt. Hermon, which still had snow on it in May.

  23. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    La Jagua de Ibirico, Colombia

  24. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Barrow, AK

  25. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    i visited the "door to hell" in the middle of the desert of turkmenistan. kinda a bitch to get there. got to hire a private taxi as the public transport there is basically non existent. told the guy to pick us up in the morning, but he never came. left us completely stranded in the middle of the desert. luckily we got picked up buy someone else. it's a shame they are closing it, because it's one of the only interesting thing in that god forsaken country.

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