Retiring in SEA

I have about $150,000 save up from well tuned investment. I want to escape the rat race. Where can I go to max my retirement? As I get older health care is important, so which place has cheap living but good health care in SEA?

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    > $150,000
    > retire

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have a similar amount, you can't retire with that. But you can buy a small house in a third world country and then work remotely or part time to cover the (very low) cost of living. You wouldn't be renting or paying a mortgage so basically just food, utilities and flight tickets. Also you'll be living in a cool tropical country rather than a Globohomo dump.
    I am going on a few trips to see different places and if I fall in love with one I am going to do exactly this, no LARP. I don't have many friends and 2 people I know have already emigrated and aren't looking back with less money so I know it's not a dumb pipe dream.

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have $120k and I havent finished school yet. You are delusional if you think you can retire with that these days

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Philippines could cost $500 per month if you're disciplined. If you're a good investor you could stretch you principal longer than the 300 months that your savings will get you. But even if you just use savings you could potentially retire for 25 years before you need to worry. Check out this video https://youtu.be/lPpNReTPoRs

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >If you're a good investor you could stretch you principal longer than the 300 months that your savings will get you
      what on earth are you talking about?
      the point of investing is you don't spend the invested amount but get an income from it
      $150,000 with a modest return of 5% a year is $7,500 per year or $625 per month
      that is actually a moderate wage in a lot of countries. but the people that get paid that sort of wage don't live the kind of life that most people in us/europe would be prepared to put up with for a very long time

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >$150,000 with a modest return of 5% a year is $7,500 per year or $625 per month

        Where can one put $150,000 to earn a 5% per year yield safely without risk though? Like something that is accessible, not locked away in a retire account.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Where can one put $150,000 to earn a 5% per year yield safely
          >Like something that is accessible, not locked away in a retire account.
          a basket of etfs. for example, the current average dividend yield across the ftse100 is 4.2%. the top 10 yields are all above 7%. there are several high yield etfs that would suffice. the most common one is ishares IUKD.
          >without risk though?
          there is no such thing as "without risk". however diversity is your friend. with $150,000, $15,000 invested in each of 10 suitable etfs would probably mitigate risk sufficiently. as we are talking about a lifetime investment, once a year rebalancing of the basket would be adequate. this is a long haul, not day trading or cryptocurrency gambling.

          >modest return of 5% a year
          you are stupid, naive or ignorant

          fuck off, idiot child

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >idiot child
            I am 28, more money than you and worked for a bank for 3 years. Go fuck yourself retard, enjoy your retirement plan as we are on the cusp of the worse recession in our lifetimes. Enjoy your guaranteed retirement by investing in high growth equities right as quantitive tightening starts. You dumb kid.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              >I am 28, and worked for a bank for 3 years.
              counter clerks and cleaners also "work for a bank". if you were actually an investment professional you would have said so.
              >more money than you
              lol imagine trying to do this kind of angry boast on the internet. ok warren buffett whatever you say
              >enjoy your retirement plan as we are on the cusp of the worse recession in our lifetimes.
              >Enjoy your guaranteed retirement by investing in high growth equities right as quantitive tightening starts.
              still thinking short term eh? the average return on the s&p500 from 2001 to 2020 was about 7.5%, and that includes the 2008 financial crisis.
              also, grow up. "enjoy your strawman bad thing". if you're 28 you should try talking like an actual adult for a change rather than screeching like an angry child.

              [...]

              4% pre tax, inflation is 12%
              you idiot anon. the idea is to grow dividends at a higher rate than inflation. high yield etfs generally attempt to do this. of course you can also do it yourself by filtering to see which companies have consistently grown dividends over a long period of time.
              you apparently can't tell the difference between percentage points and percentage growth. did you not pay very much attention in maths at school?
              >pre tax
              most civilised countries have tax free savings/investment allowances for individuals. for example in the UK we have ISAs. i don't know what the usa equivalent is (401k? but that's a retirement account i think?). you probably wouldn't be able to put such a large sum as $150,000 into the account in one year (in a uk ISA, the max is £20,000 per year) so you would have to pay tax on part of the capital every year until you can get it all inside the tax-free wrapper. once inside, you don't pay tax on either dividend yield, or capital growth, unless you take it out of the wrapper again. obviously you would only do that if you wanted to live on the dividends it provides.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                p.s.

                >idiot child
                I am 28, more money than you and worked for a bank for 3 years. Go fuck yourself retard, enjoy your retirement plan as we are on the cusp of the worse recession in our lifetimes. Enjoy your guaranteed retirement by investing in high growth equities right as quantitive tightening starts. You dumb kid.

                >high growth equities
                generally speaking the companies that pay the most consistent high dividend yields are not "high growth equities". they tend to be quite boring companies like utilities, banks and so on. high growth investing and high yield investing are quite different things. there is a place for both, of course, but the general focus here is on stretching out a fixed amount to provide a lifetime income.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                >I am 28, and worked for a bank for 3 years.
                counter clerks and cleaners also "work for a bank". if you were actually an investment professional you would have said so.
                >more money than you
                lol imagine trying to do this kind of angry boast on the internet. ok warren buffett whatever you say
                >enjoy your retirement plan as we are on the cusp of the worse recession in our lifetimes.
                >Enjoy your guaranteed retirement by investing in high growth equities right as quantitive tightening starts.
                still thinking short term eh? the average return on the s&p500 from 2001 to 2020 was about 7.5%, and that includes the 2008 financial crisis.
                also, grow up. "enjoy your strawman bad thing". if you're 28 you should try talking like an actual adult for a change rather than screeching like an angry child.
                [...]
                4% pre tax, inflation is 12%
                you idiot anon. the idea is to grow dividends at a higher rate than inflation. high yield etfs generally attempt to do this. of course you can also do it yourself by filtering to see which companies have consistently grown dividends over a long period of time.
                you apparently can't tell the difference between percentage points and percentage growth. did you not pay very much attention in maths at school?
                >pre tax
                most civilised countries have tax free savings/investment allowances for individuals. for example in the UK we have ISAs. i don't know what the usa equivalent is (401k? but that's a retirement account i think?). you probably wouldn't be able to put such a large sum as $150,000 into the account in one year (in a uk ISA, the max is £20,000 per year) so you would have to pay tax on part of the capital every year until you can get it all inside the tax-free wrapper. once inside, you don't pay tax on either dividend yield, or capital growth, unless you take it out of the wrapper again. obviously you would only do that if you wanted to live on the dividends it provides.

                Why are people so obsessed with high yield dividend ETFs over just investing in a Global index fund which focuses on growth.

                Surely you're better off with the growth of the fund and the 1.7%~ yearly dividend and just selling the amount when you need it?

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                1.7%? Why would I expose myself to risk just for a measly shitty 1.7%? 1.7% of $150,000 is $2550. I'd rather just keep my money safe and easily accessible in a Savings account.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              >quantitative tightening is going to happen for real
              I actually believe you work in a bank, as only the fucking midwits in tradfi are this fucking retarded.

              Real interest rates, not this doctored CPI bullshit but the real rates, are somewhere in the 30-50% ballpark. They turned off the printer but you can still expect a good 15-20% for the coming year. Now, please tell me how the fed is going to match a 15+% interest rate with already a huge US budget deficit and spending promises it cannot afford.

              The US dollar is FUCKED. The petrodollar system broke a few months ago. When Russia ties up the Ukraine war, we will see many third world countries realign under Vlad and sell their oil for rubles. Expect Lira level inflation real soon.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                >the real rates, are somewhere in the 30-50% ballpark

                Yeah ok

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Go ahead and lose your lunch. Midwits like you are why the efficient market hypothesis is total bullshit. All firms get filled with self satisfied retards that think the fed is the literal hand of god able to set prices at whatever they like.

                It makes speculating interesting at least. Where do you allocate if the entire financial economy is bullshit, but the world has actual physical things that people trade for underneath. Really bearish on western economy, too detached from reality, even if the actually valuable industries like engineering R&D and resource extraction are filled with talent, they cannot function without a financial industry that hasn't lost its mind.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                You've provided no evidence or reasoning for your train of thought, opting instead for insane rambling and general gayry. This is why no one takes you seriously here or abroad

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                I am not here to do anything but insult you, midwit. You are incapable and unwilling to form your own worldview and frame, and have adopted the status quo worldview and frame. This is going to bite you in the ass, and the collective arbitrage I will take on the bad decisions of people who think just like you is going to make me money.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          That’s actually both a big and small question.

          In short: the stock market tends to give returns of about 10% per year. Even with crazy money printing like now, a lot of that goes to there. More than 50% of activity in that matter, or some staggering percentage like that, goes to the top 25 stocks. These would be the “safest”.

          People spend a really long time answering the question you just asked, and no one here, including myself, is qualified to really tell you with so much at stake.

          I recommend you subscribe to the newsletter “ InvesTech “ and they will list out a portfolio format that would be more suited for you. Probably the cheapest you’ll get professional advice.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >modest return of 5% a year
      you are stupid, naive or ignorant

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    snappy comeback, anon. got any actual points to make?

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >are you black?
    no. but i am an adult and not a prescription medication addicted zoomer with a three second attention span.
    ok, you've seen my answer to the OP question. take it or leave it. it's close to how i've been investing the majority of my money for the past couple of decades and i have made a pretty good pile from it.
    now why don't you try contributing something to the discussion instead of throwing your toys out of your pram?
    how would you best invest a capital amount of $150,000 to give a sustainable income over a lifetime?

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    sweet fucking jesus
    tell me you're not really this stupid anon
    go back to school. you did go to one, right?

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    150k

    This is one of the most retarded posts I've ever read.

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