Should I move to Korea for a bit?

I can use the F4 visa since my mom was Korean. I've never been a Korean citizen so they can't get me on any of that conscription bullshit.
I don't speak any 'rean though.

Has anyone visited Korea, or lived there for a long(er) period of time? What was your experience like?

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  1. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    lived there for 5 years and can recommend. It was a great time and I got married there. Decided to head back to Canada for better job security. I heard it has gotten pretty shitty now that a few people have made big bank on real estate deals and COVID destroyed all the fun stuff to do. If you are on F4 though Koreans might treat you shit. They tend to prefer white overly gregarious guys or dumb blondes with midwest accents like on TV.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not blonde or a girl but I am dumb with a midwest accent.
      Sucks to hear that it's worse after covid but I think that goes for a lot of places.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      homosexual

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      piggybacking, would South Korea (Seoul in particular) be a good place for a Canadian student to do an exchange semester? I’ve heard it’s great for students there, but I’m also considering Japan or somewhere in Eastern Europe. I’m not averse to spending, but I’m also not looking to drop western europe levels of cash to have a good time there.
      I’ve also heard that drinking culture is nuts there, and I’m definitely more of an early morning than late nights guy. Big on nature too, and I don’t really drink. Would it still be fun?

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        I would, its only a semester
        >drinking culture is nuts there
        from the brief time I was there it is, its like england where I live

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          how do you think it would compare to tokyo or say prague for a student?

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          >its like england where I live
          >'avin a pint of beer with soju with the lads
          kino

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Big on nature too
        it's not gonna be Canada levels of nature, so forget that. but the hiking spots easily accessible from Seoul are >>>> Prague and also better than Tokyo. i'm pretty sure there will be some sort of hiking club in whichever Seoul uni you go to.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Big on nature too
        it's not gonna be Canada levels of nature, so forget that. but the hiking spots easily accessible from Seoul are >>>> Prague and also better than Tokyo. i'm pretty sure there will be some sort of hiking club in whichever Seoul uni you go to.

        Also it's easier to get away with not drinking (much) in East Asia compared to Eastern Europe.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Koreans are kinda the exception of East Asia on that point

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            [...]
            Also it's easier to get away with not drinking (much) in East Asia compared to Eastern Europe.

            this. they piss tanks.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            Still can't be compared to Prague. At least Koreans have way less alcohol tolerance compared to Czech people, so all group events end in someone passing out earlier... In Czechia it can go on until it's time go go to uni in the morning. In Korea it can go on long as well, but they're just no competition for Czechia specifically. And yeah, Prague has a café culture, but it's nowhere near the café culture of Seoul in terms of quantity and opening timed. In Seoul it's just easier to convince people to go go a café instead of a hof or bar or whatever drinking place, simply cause you'll always have some random café that's open at night. If you're near universities, it might even be some cool café ran by students, too, something with a bar vibe, not just one of the chains.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              In Korea you have to stay out until the subway opens up at 5:30 am because getting a cab from a pub area is impossible these days

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Isn't Korea the cou try where people literally take pills so they can drink more

  2. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    What's your skillset? Just be expected to be paid less for the same skills in the US with even worse CoL imbalance.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      None really

      homosexual

      Why so hostile m8?

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >What's your skillset? Just be expected to be paid less for the same skills in the US with even worse CoL imbalance.
        Is it even possible to get a job there that isn't white monkey/english teacher stuff? And even those might be out if OP looks asian. I thought South Koreans were generally discriminatory to non-koreans, and even to overseas koreans, and you won't get anywhere unless you speak the language and understand the culture which both of which are complicated and hard to understand for westerners.

        If OP has no skillset but a degree, yeah english teacher is straight up for him as he's basically just paid to be in the classroom for the 1 or 2 people actually trying to speak english.

        Unironically it's not even worth leaving Seoul.

        It is but you really need to be a non coomer and active planner in order to enjoy it. Seouls where most shit happens but there are plenty of towns that have shit to do.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          >he's basically just paid to be in the classroom for the 1 or 2 people actually trying to speak english.
          That's not how it is in Korea. If you want a dancing monkey job don't work at a hagwon.
          Its more likely they'll have him teaching 7 different classes of 15 8 year olds on day 2 and than having to correct grammar on all 100 of his students assignments each week.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >What's your skillset? Just be expected to be paid less for the same skills in the US with even worse CoL imbalance.
      Is it even possible to get a job there that isn't white monkey/english teacher stuff? And even those might be out if OP looks asian. I thought South Koreans were generally discriminatory to non-koreans, and even to overseas koreans, and you won't get anywhere unless you speak the language and understand the culture which both of which are complicated and hard to understand for westerners.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >And even those might be out if OP looks asian
        This isn't true at all. There's tons of Gyopos that teach English. If he has an F visa many places will prefer him since they don't have to worry about any visa paperwork.

        https://i.imgur.com/TWYIOIt.jpg

        I don’t necessarily have to go on the f-4 visa. It may even be easier to not opt for that. I will have a degree (hopefully) albeit one that would only net me entry level wagies.

        From what I am reading, Seoul seems pretty kino. It’s a small country too so I should be able to see most of it without having to take overly long trips.

        Unless you have some explicit skillset, your best option without knowing Korean will be an English teaching job. If you can get the F-4 visa easily go for it since it will give you more freedom than being on the E-2 (language teacher) visa.
        Don't listen to the people saying you can't teach English if you're not white, they don't anything about Korea and are confusing it with China or something. But keep in mind most Hagwon positions are actual teaching jobs and you'll likely be teaching a class of kids on your own, they're not dancing monkey jobs that the people in Japan do (or public school teachers in Korea)

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Sounds good. I figured teaching English would be the only real viable option anyways, even if I were to acquire a skillset. The language barrier is too great.
          I’d be a bit nervous about teaching a highschool class or something though. They give you a curriculum and stuff to cover, yes? Does anyone have experience being an english teacher?

          Unironically it's not even worth leaving Seoul.

          This is probably true. I’ve never had the heckin walkable megacity experience before anyways so there will be plenty for me to explore.

          Anyways, what are some fun things to do in Seoul, or to check out? Any food I should try? I’ve honestly not had that much Korean food at all.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Does anyone have experience being an english teacher?
            I do
            >I’d be a bit nervous about teaching a highschool class or something though
            You won't teach high schoolers, you'll teach kindy, elementary and/or middle schoolers. For kindy and maybe younger elementary you'll likely have a Korean in the room helping you. I've only taught older elementary and middle school levels so I don't have any personal experience with that.
            >They give you a curriculum and stuff to cover, yes?
            Yes, for most classes at least. In my case, for most classes they give you the textbook pages to teach and the tests are made by people in the headquarters (its a chain). They also have PPTs and materials that are barely usable. However, I did have to teach an "essay writing" class where I pretty much had to make it up as I go, but there was so many worksheets available. However this varies by job, this is just my experience. If you do research, the chains all get hate online but they're the most reliable place to get a job at, keep in mind there's a lot of idiots (I worked with my fair share during my two years there) who try to do this so when you see someone's "horrible experience" there's a large chance they are at fault.
            I'm sure you'd be fine, once you start teaching you'll get the hang of it and have fun.
            If you're interested, just go on craigslist and apply for various job openings. There's a shortage of teachers so you should be able to get one in Seoul or a satellite city pretty easily
            >Anyways, what are some fun things to do in Seoul, or to check out?
            Honestly the night life is the main attraction. Check out Itaewon and Hongdae
            >Any food I should try?
            Korean barbecue and Yanggochi (Chinese lamb skewers) are both popular and good. I'm sure your mom can tell you more.
            Korean food is obviously a lot of rice and soup, but fried chicken is also popular these days.

  3. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah, Seoul is a good city and I imagine it'd be good to spend some time in your mothers home country.
    For job, since you don't speak Korean, you're probably limited to teaching English, which isn't a bad thing to do for a year or two but it isn't a career. They don't pay well but they'll pay for your apartment so you can save money (technically they're not legally obligated to pay for yours since you're on F4 visa, but demand it since they'd have to pay for anyone who isn't Korean ethnicity).
    If you weren't on F4 visa a degree would be a hard requirement, but since you are you can probably find a job without a degree.
    Also I know plenty of Korean-Americans who have had a great time in Korea, don't have any personal experience but I seriously doubt Koreans will actually "treat you shit". Maybe a few buttholes who get mad that you don't know the language/customs, but who really cares about a few buttholes.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      I don’t necessarily have to go on the f-4 visa. It may even be easier to not opt for that. I will have a degree (hopefully) albeit one that would only net me entry level wagies.

      From what I am reading, Seoul seems pretty kino. It’s a small country too so I should be able to see most of it without having to take overly long trips.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Unironically it's not even worth leaving Seoul.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Leave Seoul to see different mountains I guess
          The cities are all the same you see in Seoul area but smaller and less fun

  4. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    ITT: socially moronic white bois w/ yellow fever

  5. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    >since my mom was Korean
    I'm glad she got better

  6. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Visiting Korea now. Quite nice. Loads of foreigners compared to China. Everyone is friendly, worst is a couple impatient old service industry ppl but they're not overly obnoxious like Americans. Haven't been here long but can see why it's easier for westerners to live here compared to China or Japan.

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