They call Banh Mi "Vietnamese Hoagies" in Philadelphia.

They call Banh Mi "Vietnamese Hoagies" in Philadelphia. Do you guys have any other interesting localization examples?

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  1. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lol that’s so cringe and fat cultureless American slopoid

  2. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    It literally is a Vietnamese Hoagie though? What's the issue

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Vietnamese Hoagie
      Hoagie is not a worl gay kys

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >don't call banh mi a hoagie
        >call a baguette bang mi

        people are stupid, imagine if the french made pho and just renamed it some french thingie or something, frickers would lose their minds

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          >hoagie
          Not a word mouthbreather

  3. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    As far as i've seen, in Asia it's not ok to not finish your meal.
    I guess it's not reallyv ok in any culture, but asians get really mad when you don't eat all your plate, which is weird to me. I paid for the shit, if i want to feed the birds with it, i do what i want.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      The word 'banh mi' has already been appropriated by several languages and cultures to refer exclusively to Vietnamese-style sandwiches, when in Vietnamese it is not so.
      The Dutch word 'broodje' is not a 1-1 linguistic situation, but it has some overlap. "Broodjes" are not all Dutch sandwiches, but a Canadian who has visited the Netherlands before might think of the word 'broodje' and picture Dutch sandwiches, when in reality, 'broodje' just means sandwich (or something similar, like 'broodje kip').
      I'm not a flaming tard getting infuriated over linguistic appropriation.
      I'm saying that this Philadelphia localization is a localization of a localization.

      Asia is a region. If there isn't any food left over on the table at the end of a banquet-style dinner in (certain cultures within) China, that means you didn't order enough.
      Boxing up the stuff to split between parties involved is seen as no problemo in one city of one province, but seen as a sign of poor-hood in another city within that same province.

  4. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've been to this shop before. Chinatown Philly is pretty shitty and gross area but this place and decent banh mi

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah its not bad. I like Mi n Tea in Manayunk better though

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/urzKgvt.jpg

      They call Banh Mi "Vietnamese Hoagies" in Philadelphia. Do you guys have any other interesting localization examples?

      I used to have lunch in Chinatown a few times a week, went to this place often. Philly in general is pretty shitty and gross but Chinatown has a number of very good restaurants specializing in authentic and difficult to find styles of Asian cuisine and they're cheap.

  5. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    I visited my friend in Pewter City a while back, and their donuts look suspiciously like onigiri.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      were they jelly-filled?

  6. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Kill all Philadelphians

  7. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    what the frick is a hoagie? american slop?

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Americans have different and regional varieties of sub sandwiches yes.

  8. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >translating foreign things into your local language so people there can understand what it means

    Whoa...

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >They don't call it a Vietnamese Hoagie?
      >No, they got their own language there.
      >Then what do they call it?
      >They call it a Banh Mi.

  9. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    I saw an Indian takeaway/deli in the streetside/pre-security area of O’Hare airport in that hilariously called samosas “Indian pierogi.”

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >called samosas “Indian pierogi.”
      based

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/B47gGU2.jpg

      >called samosas “Indian pierogi.”
      based

      >flour-based dough
      >potato stuffing
      >large slavic/EE population
      I mean, why the frick not?

  10. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >They call Banh Mi "Vietnamese Hoagies"
    That style of localization is very common all over the world. You take something foreign & unfamiliar, and you familiarize it by tacking on its demonym to the closest local equivalent.

    Real examples I've seen/heard in person:
    Lahmacun = Turkish Pizza
    Wasabi = Japanese Mustard
    Pasbreastsio = Greek Lasagna
    Injera = Ethiopian Tortilla
    Yakisoba = Japanese Chow Mein
    Gimbap = Korean Sushi

    I've even heard Koreans referring to Ravioli as "Italian Mandu," and Pancit as "Filipino Japchae."

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >That style of localization is very common all over the world
      No shit that's why this is a thread

  11. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    In New England they call potstickers "Chinese ravioli"

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >In New England they call potstickers "Chinese ravioli"
      kek I don't believe this one

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        I didn't either, so I had to look it up. Turns out it's actually "Peking Ravioli."

  12. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Roujiamo is slowly starting to gain popularity, and a lot of people are calling it a "Chinese Burger."

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