Travel experiences in India

Can some anons share?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm Indian so AMA. I have seen and photographed tigers and other wildlife in the wild.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      If I, a white man, were to travel to India where would you recommend where I'm not getting hounded by Indians trying to sell me shit

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The Himalayas or Western Ghats. Anywhere with less people and more nature.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Literally anywhere that isn't a neighborhood or district especially popular with foreign tourists. Good examples include:
        >the Pink City in Jaipur
        >anywhere near the Taj Mahal
        >Paharganj in New Delhi

        If you take one step outside of these sorts of places, you'll find that most Indians are either ambivalent to your presence or moderately intrigued by the sight of a foreigner. Assuming you're a man, other people aren't likely to cause you any problems. It's actually quite easy to meet ordinary, decent Indians--a fair number of whom speak English with some proficiency, and will go out of their way to show you the best sides of their culture and country.

        Anyway, I have plenty of travel experience in India. I've visited at least two-dozen times, speak Hindi, and lived in a Tier-1 city for several years. My last domestic trip before moving back to the U.S. in 2023 was a motorcycle circuit on the following route:
        >Kolkata
        >Jamshedpur
        >the Saranda-Singhbhum range in Jharkhand
        >rural Odisha and tracts of the Eastern Ghats
        >rural Chhattisgarh
        >the Araku Valley in Andhra Pradesh
        >Vizag
        >return

        This was when I was still living in India, and it took about a ~month from start to finish.

        I've spent a lot of time in small villages and other remote areas. In some parts of the country, like Jharkhand, there is still a very real risk of banditry (or dacoity), which is why locals typically recommend returning to city limits by nightfall. However, I have yet to have anything resembling a negative experience with people in these regions.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          your post has single-handedly saved the thread from jannie extermination

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          What a wealth of information.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I had wonderful two months solo traveling, lowkey shifted my whole life. Himalayas are worth visiting but reserve plenty time like couple weeks or more.

        Learn to ignore minimally and politely, all the merchants see you are not just a tourist and don't bother you. They are experts at reading body language and see if you cuck on any level.

        In which places is better to avoid street food?

        Street food is the best option everywhere, it's clean* and you can see them preparing it. The worst choice is expensive tourist restaurants, snots and cum fly in those kitchens.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Learn to ignore minimally and politely, all the merchants see you are not just a tourist and don't bother you. They are experts at reading body language and see if you cuck on any level.
          Also, this.

          Anon here is giving good advice. I know a handful of tourist touts in Delhi's Paharganj, and they very specifically target people who look like first-time visitors. If a foreigner seems too comfortable in their own surroundings, they're presumed to have spent sufficient time in the country to be privy to most common scams--and are, accordingly, written off as wastes of time.

          I'd also suggest that making an effort to dress like a normal human being can go a long way. There are a good number of Western expatriates and long-term residents in cities like Delhi and Mumbai, and you can very easily tell them apart from most tourists--because foreign residents wear ordinary clothes, whereas tourists will typically tromp around upscale markets in harem pants or jungle-explorer outfits.

          At any rate, all you have to do to get rid of 95% of touts, beggars, and hawkers is pretend like they don't exist. Shake your head and maybe once and say "no thanks" once, ignore them, and carry on with whatever you were doing beforehand. Responding just encourages them, especially kids.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Terrible advice. The fact this advice is on SighSee means that '''merchants''' are already to wise to this behaviour, and means you'll be marked. in fact, it's the "sophisticated know it all traveler" who they target 2x as hard, because they know they'll think they're too smart to be scammed, and will fall twice as hard for twice as much.

            Wearing colonial gear, goa beach clothes, etc, is literally the way to go. You just smile jokingly with them, make a comment, and then be on your way. If they follow you, you pretend to have a look at what they're selling, then say "maybe later" and walk off. They appreciate being treated like a normal human, and will understand.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >Wearing colonial gear, goa beach clothes, etc, is literally the way to go.
              I'm that anon, and I can't say anything in response to this. Unironically made me kek.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Anon is probably using the term "metro" as shorthand for "Tier-1 city," which refers to a specific subset of Indian cities with large populations and better-developed economies.

          IIRC, the Tier-1 cities include:
          >Delhi
          >Mumbai
          >Bangalore
          >Chennai
          >Pune
          >Kolkata
          >Hyderabad

          Basically, if you're in a big city, you can find "safe," foreigner-friendly food--from Western chains, and Indian brands--in shopping mall food courts (Indians are still really into shopping malls).

          Literally anywhere that isn't a neighborhood or district especially popular with foreign tourists. Good examples include:
          >the Pink City in Jaipur
          >anywhere near the Taj Mahal
          >Paharganj in New Delhi

          If you take one step outside of these sorts of places, you'll find that most Indians are either ambivalent to your presence or moderately intrigued by the sight of a foreigner. Assuming you're a man, other people aren't likely to cause you any problems. It's actually quite easy to meet ordinary, decent Indians--a fair number of whom speak English with some proficiency, and will go out of their way to show you the best sides of their culture and country.

          Anyway, I have plenty of travel experience in India. I've visited at least two-dozen times, speak Hindi, and lived in a Tier-1 city for several years. My last domestic trip before moving back to the U.S. in 2023 was a motorcycle circuit on the following route:
          >Kolkata
          >Jamshedpur
          >the Saranda-Singhbhum range in Jharkhand
          >rural Odisha and tracts of the Eastern Ghats
          >rural Chhattisgarh
          >the Araku Valley in Andhra Pradesh
          >Vizag
          >return

          This was when I was still living in India, and it took about a ~month from start to finish.

          I've spent a lot of time in small villages and other remote areas. In some parts of the country, like Jharkhand, there is still a very real risk of banditry (or dacoity), which is why locals typically recommend returning to city limits by nightfall. However, I have yet to have anything resembling a negative experience with people in these regions.

          These anons changed my life. Thank you.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      In which places is better to avoid street food?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Everywhere tbh. Even if the place is hygienic they might use spices too strong for a whitey's bland stomach. Only buy fruits, coconut water and a cob of corn from street vendors.

        [...]

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >if you're in a metro and confused, just go to the nearest shopping mall's food court
          What does this mean?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Anon is probably using the term "metro" as shorthand for "Tier-1 city," which refers to a specific subset of Indian cities with large populations and better-developed economies.

            IIRC, the Tier-1 cities include:
            >Delhi
            >Mumbai
            >Bangalore
            >Chennai
            >Pune
            >Kolkata
            >Hyderabad

            Basically, if you're in a big city, you can find "safe," foreigner-friendly food--from Western chains, and Indian brands--in shopping mall food courts (Indians are still really into shopping malls).

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              I see, in "Tier 1 city" there isn't any tiger in the road?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              This

              I see, in "Tier 1 city" there isn't any tiger in the road?

              Not a tiger but leopards co-exist in tier 1 cities, especially Mumbai. There's a National Park in the middle of Mumbai with 30-40 leopards.

              Drenching poverty food in spices isn't flavor. Spice is 1 flavor, there exists many others. Melanated fingers typed that.

              >Spice is 1 flavour
              Topkek. This homie equates spice with "spicy".
              What are the ingredients for poverty food according to you?

              I saw you in another thread. I'm a lowly bug photographer in the usa/eastern europe

              Eastern Europe is beautiful in terms of nature and wildlife. Don't know which country you exactly live in but that region has healthy populations of bears, wolves and lynxes. Try photographing those and birds obviously. Even I don't own a super telephoto lens lol

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I lived in Nowy Sacz, Lodz, and Krakow. Spent a lot of time in Ukraine, Hungary, Slovokia, Czechia, Lithuania, and Austria.
                I visited many others. Only ones I never saw are russia and belarus. I did some photography in the tatras. Best area for wildlife imo in europe. Poland overall is great, they still have wild bison. I see way more in the usa. I love south dakota, wyoming, and alaska for large animals. My fav thing to photograph are proghorn and mountian goats. I would post pics but I am at work.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I have heard Romania is good for bears and lynx. Transylvania to be precise.
                I'm a big cat guy and I'm interested in coming to Europe, but I would cover Scandinavia, Scotland and Iceland first. I'm interested in Russia but it's on the Asian side, Kamchatka and Primorsky Krai to be precise. Although I need to cover my country, Kenya/Tanzania/South Africa, Pantanal and Torres Del Paine first. After that comes Europe and Russia.
                >I would post pics but I am at work.
                Will be waiting for them.
                What's your job btw tbh? I'm a 2024 CS Grad working as a DevOps intern.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I forgot to post pics and am at work again :<
                I'm a park ranger.
                Romania i've also heard is good but I didn't get to explore it much. Hungary was surprisingly good for reptiles.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >I'm a park ranger.
                That's awesome tbh. If literally every pajeet I knew wasn't involved in the rat race to get a government job. I would have also joined Indian Forest Services, but I'm not moronic enough to burn my mid 20s for a government job unlike half people of my race. It's much better to be an outsourcing corpo codemonkeying and pursue wildlife photography as a hobby

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                It is not a rat race to be a park ranger in the usa anymore.

                https://i.imgur.com/tQV40i4.jpeg

                Gunna just screenshot stuff from my media that is not bugs.
                Some bison in north dakota
                (i am amateur at this lmao)

                Proghorn in wyoming

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Pine vole in southern poland

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Red deer slovokia

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                European green lizard in hungary

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                White tail deer in Minnesota

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Gunna just screenshot stuff from my media that is not bugs.
                Some bison in north dakota
                (i am amateur at this lmao)

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Not a tiger but leopards co-exist in tier 1 cities, especially Mumbai. There's a National Park in the middle of Mumbai with 30-40 leopards.
                But these leopards are free to walk on the streets of the cities?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                They're not violent as long as someone remembers to feed them but every once in a while it's considered normal for them to eat somebody. The locals seem to be ok with this.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                That happens in rural areas and mostly with tigers. Leopards mostly pick up dogs.
                Maneaters are rare nowadays, an old tiger killing a few foresters or a leopard picking up an unattended child

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >an old tiger killing a few foresters or a leopard picking up an unattended child
                I was just shitposting but it's funny to see I wasn't completely wrong lmao

                >but every once in a while it's considered normal for them to eat somebody. The locals seem to be ok with this.
                I understand that this is a beautiful thing, but who Is slow or ill is damned?

                >but who Is slow or ill is damned?
                What?
                We're you having a stroke while writing this post?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                It's very rare. India has "megafauna" comparable to East Africa, but with more people and patches of wilderness. Elephants kill way more people than big cats here.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                To add, most big cat kills aren't done by maneaters. It's either done by the big cat in self defence or misidentification

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >To add, most big cat kills aren't done by maneaters. It's either done by the big cat in self defence or misidentification
                This an useful information.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                If you live in tigerland you obviously have to careful but if there's a place where there is chance of a bigcats actually stalking on you to fill it's tummy will be Sunderbans on the India-Bangladesh border and outskirts on Jim Corbett in Uttarakhand (stomping grounds of old man Corbett)

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I thought cows were being worshipped and roam around freely everywhere. Wouldn't the leopards eat them in that case? Seems a lot more nourishing than a stray dog or some starving villager child. Or maybe they're afraid of the locals anger for killing a holy animal?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                lndian leopards are too small to kill cows. Only a really big male can bring down a full grown cow. Most leopards will go for a calf.
                Cows are considered holy but so are big cats in Hinduism as they are the Vahan of the Goddesses Durga and Shakti. Tribals also worship local deities which symbolise bigcats.
                >Or maybe they're afraid of the locals anger for killing a holy animal?
                Cows are worshipped in Hinduism because it provides a lot of resources, milk from which you can create a lot of dairy products and dung from which you can get fuel and manure (inb4 poo memes)
                Although let me tell you that cows aren't worshipped throughout Hinduism as the religion itself varies region to region and like Abrahamic religions there's no single book/text to define rules and regulations.

                Coming back, cattle herders do you used to commit retaliation killing of bigcats when they picked up cattle by mostly poisioning although nowadays we have a great compensation programme in place in most places and these killings have reduced by more than 95+%

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >but every once in a while it's considered normal for them to eat somebody. The locals seem to be ok with this.
                I understand that this is a beautiful thing, but who Is slow or ill is damned?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >The locals seem to be ok with this.
                I don't see why you'd think that the locals are "okay" with it. In places with relatively dense tiger populations, many people--especially those who work in the jungle, or collect what is termed "forest produce"--are borderline petrified of tigers.

                IIRC, fear of tigers in the Sundarbans is so prevalent that it remains common for local fishermen and honey-collectors to pray to Bonbibi--an unusual goddess of the Sundarbans who protects her subjects from the more malevolent Dakshin Rai, who assumes the guise of a tiger to attack and consume those who don't pay him proper respects.

                I see, in "Tier 1 city" there isn't any tiger in the road?

                I was going to respond to this, but two other anons already did.

                Leopard sightings are still quite common in parts of suburban Mumbai--as another poster said, there's a fairly large national park on the outskirts of the city (Sanjay Gandhi National Park, if I'm not mistaken). Leopards sometimes enter the city from there, and it isn't uncommon for them to attack stray animals. There are also occasional attacks on people, too.

                If you Google "Mumbai leopard attack," there are a fair number of articles detailing recent attacks on children in parts of the city. In one case, the "feral dog" believed to have attacked a young boy turned out to have been a leopard.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Leopard sightings are still quite common in parts of suburban Mumbai--as another poster said, there's a fairly large national park on the outskirts of the city (Sanjay Gandhi National Park, if I'm not mistaken). Leopards sometimes enter the city from there, and it isn't uncommon for them to attack stray animals. There are also occasional attacks on people, too.
                Correct. Aarey Colony and IIT Bombay have frequent leopard sightings as well.
                >don't see why you'd think that the locals are "okay" with it. In places with relatively dense tiger populations, many people--especially those who work in the jungle, or collect what is termed "forest produce"--are borderline petrified of tigers
                Fear of wild animals especially predators is a very primal fear tbh everybody has them, but tiger tourism has reduced dependency on forests greatly and benefited locals.
                >IIRC, fear of tigers in the Sundarbans is so prevalent that it remains common for local fishermen and honey-collectors to pray to Bonbibi--an unusual goddess of the Sundarbans who protects her subjects from the more malevolent Dakshin Rai, who assumes the guise of a tiger to attack and consume those who don't pay him proper respects
                Correct but the situation there has improved a lot atleast in the Indian side of Sunderbans, way less tiger attacks nowadays.

                https://i.imgur.com/Tm6nIw0.jpeg

                It is not a rat race to be a park ranger in the usa anymore.
                [...]
                Proghorn in wyoming

                Nice shot. Visit Alaska and Pacific NW tbh. It's one of my dream destinations. Yellowstone too. What's North America's equivalent of Torres Del Paine when it comes to Cougar sightings?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Fear of wild animals especially predators is a very primal fear tbh everybody has them, but tiger tourism has reduced dependency on forests greatly and benefited locals.
                I'd wager that's correct in most cases, but slightly less-than-correct in others--it certainly isn't always true when it comes to other national parks, or at least those that don't have tigers.

                >Correct but the situation there has improved a lot atleast in the Indian side of Sunderbans, way less tiger attacks nowadays.
                I'm sure there's much better management nowadays than there was in the past. I can't remember the source, but I recall coming across a journal entry or other article that detailed annual tiger fatalities on the Indian and Bangladeshi sides of the Sundarbans.

                IIRC, fatalities on the Indian side have fallen precipitously in the last ~15-25 years, whereas attacks remain (comparably) common in Bangladesh. Which I guess would make sense, given both that more of the Sundarbans is in Bangladesh than in India, and that Bangladesh probably has less-robust protections.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I have seen a cougar in the wild, once in my life. There is no best answer for this. It's really really hard to see a cougar. I've seen a lot of bobcat, fox, coyote, fishers, porcupine, wolves, etc.
                I'm not the one to ask but I've been told texas is pretty good, along with montana. They hate being around other mountain lions so It's like an even spread across the west.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'm the anon from the post above yours.

                Can't add anything constructive, but I tried Googling the answer to anon's question and it seems that Big Bend National Park has a surprising number of mountain lion sightings reported annually.

                I've certainly never seen one IRL, but I remember coming across tracks when I was much younger and on a hunting trip.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                They're so rare my finding made the news here lmao

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah.

                I'm originally from the Great Lakes region, and used to go deer hunting with my dad in Northern Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula. We once happened across a series of cat prints in the snow which looked far too large--in terms of size, and stride--to have come from a bobcat or lynx. It was eerie, and I wouldn't have been old enough to make any conclusion on my own.

                My dad did grow up hunting in a much more rugged part of the country, where large predators are more common, and I trust he knew what he was talking about (he also has university degrees in botany- and wildlife-related stuff, too).

                But, if I'm remembering correctly, the state quite vehemently denied the presence of mountain lions--although, several years later, the DNR recognized a "transient" population of mountain lions that now seem to be stable and breeding.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I actually remember him taking a picture of the tracks--wouldn't be surprised if he still has it somewhere.

                Completely unrelated, but one of my treasured childhood memories relates to camping in the U.P.--we had to leave our isolated campsite for all of 10 minutes, and didn't take the time to proper bear-proof. After we came back, my dad realized that our cooler was missing. He'd initially thought we'd been robbed, but didn't think it'd make much sense for a thief to run off with a cooler full of food while leaving everything else behind.

                We took a walk around and found that a bear had dragged it a few hundred years off and was still struggling to open it. Bear ran off, we recovered the cooler, and my dad still uses it to this day--it's covered in bite marks, and makes for a pretty cool memento, IMO (as well as a lesson in keeping food secured even when taking a very brief break from camp).

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yes, MN/WI (god’s country) do have mountian lions.
                I’ve come across a lot of black bears in wisconsin. More than any state, even yellowstone area of wyoming.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                That's nice. I have seen tigers and leopards multiple times including cubs as youngs as 3 months 🙂

                >Fear of wild animals especially predators is a very primal fear tbh everybody has them, but tiger tourism has reduced dependency on forests greatly and benefited locals.
                I'd wager that's correct in most cases, but slightly less-than-correct in others--it certainly isn't always true when it comes to other national parks, or at least those that don't have tigers.

                >Correct but the situation there has improved a lot atleast in the Indian side of Sunderbans, way less tiger attacks nowadays.
                I'm sure there's much better management nowadays than there was in the past. I can't remember the source, but I recall coming across a journal entry or other article that detailed annual tiger fatalities on the Indian and Bangladeshi sides of the Sundarbans.

                IIRC, fatalities on the Indian side have fallen precipitously in the last ~15-25 years, whereas attacks remain (comparably) common in Bangladesh. Which I guess would make sense, given both that more of the Sundarbans is in Bangladesh than in India, and that Bangladesh probably has less-robust protections.

                Bangladesh has 65% of Sunderbans and despite that India has better management in all aspects of conservation. Indian Sunderbans is even said to have a higher tiger density.

                I'm the anon from the post above yours.

                Can't add anything constructive, but I tried Googling the answer to anon's question and it seems that Big Bend National Park has a surprising number of mountain lion sightings reported annually.

                I've certainly never seen one IRL, but I remember coming across tracks when I was much younger and on a hunting trip.

                Thanks tbh will look into it. The best place in the world for cougar sightings is Torres Del Paine tho

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'm not entertaining a racist joke chud.

                ?si=dz1aJ5PoODHvAKBV

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I will watch this video, is not a joke, I want to visit India and I want to gather informations, this is racist?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Drenching poverty food in spices isn't flavor. Spice is 1 flavor, there exists many others. Melanated fingers typed that.

          • 2 months ago
            Op

            >spice is one flavor

            Top kek, are you an incompetent teenager? Define spice, you non-cooking gremlin

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              I cook with more spices daily than the whole white population of all British Isles does in a year. I don't need to explain the delicate dance of spices and aromas to you.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah, you do. You don't even know what the definition of a spice is, much less how each emparts a different flavor. You think it's all one flavor.
                If you use paprika in addition to salt and pepper, you've already used more "spices" than the brits. I'm judging your palate very harshly. What's your favorite thing to cook? (No wrong answers here)

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >What's your favorite thing to cook?
                Chicken Tikka/Tandoori Chicken.
                I don't have a tandoori/grill so to impart smokey flavour I burn a small piece of coal and add a tbsp of ghee/clarified butter.
                >If you use paprika in addition to salt and pepper, you've already used more "spices" than the brits.
                In my kitchen I mostly use (not for this recipe but general cooking):
                Cumin powder
                Cardamom powder
                Kashmiri chili powder for colour
                Turmeric
                Onion powder
                Garlic powder
                Garam Masala
                Amchur Powder (Dry Mango Powder)
                Chaat masala
                Mace powder
                Fenugreek leaves.
                These all are powdered spices. I use whole spices as well.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Honestly, that sounds a lot like my spice cabinet at home. Granted, I also have most of what I need for Italian styles, Mexican, Chinese/oriental styles.
                I do enjoy Fusion cooking much more than traditional styles, personally.
                My favorite grilling recipe (aside from steak) is chicken tandoori also... but marinated in a tandoori spices/onions sauce slurry, instead of the traditional yogurt.
                You've gained my respect for your spice collection.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >but marinated in a tandoori spices/onions sauce slurry, instead of the traditional yogurt.
                That's a boneless chicken masala/curry then. Now I feel what Italians feel like when their food is ruined. Yogurt tenderises the chicken, mellows out and blends the spices you use togather. It is literally the base and binder of the marinate.
                Now I feel what Italians feel when their traditional dishes are destroyed.
                >You've gained my respect for your spice collection
                I'm Indian tbh. These are always in the pantry and in the monthly grocery run list.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yikes, You're pretentious. Try it out, I can guarentee my method makes for more flavorful and tender meat. It's the tandoori seasoning that makes it tandoori (but since we're splitting hairs, if it's not in a tandoor, then you're just making grilled chicken). Food evolves with the time, same as everything. New methods, New flavors. I'm Indian too bud, who really cares.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              he is right indians have one fricking flavor. first two weeks the food tastes amazing until you realize it's the only flavor
              what's worse, the wet shit you spew out smells the same
              how they can be this moronic i will never know

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >first two weeks the food tastes amazing until you realize it's the only flavor
                Two weeks? I was bored with the food after 5 days. It all tastes and smells the same and has the same texture.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Dysentery is a spice now apparently.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Indian subcontinent, SEA, rural China.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's best to just avoid streetfood all together.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I saw you in another thread. I'm a lowly bug photographer in the usa/eastern europe

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        common rusindian bromance jej

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    oldgay here, was in India once in 2006, Mumbai, made the mistake of walking into an ATM booth on a busy street, when I came out I had 20 street children begging and following me, walked into a high end hotel lobby/bar and the door guard beat the children with a stick when they tried to follow me in, had a starving mother try to give me her baby (it was probably a scam), ate at a local cafeteria filled with Indian men and didn’t get sick but the sanitary situation was like the meme videos, had a couple of beers but they were expensive as shit, got scammed buying a “real silk scarf,” that turned out to be a synthetic fake, overall would not recommend

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >visited Slumbai
      That's where you were wrong anon. Visit India for its natural beauty i.e. Himalayas, Western Ghats, Tiger Highlands of Central India, Northeast India, Andaman & Nicobar Islands.
      All metros, cultural and heritage tourist spots are shitholes

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >our
    Implies that you are white. You are Indian.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Can some anons share?

    I literally had a moment just like pic related.

    frick india. I don't give a frick if I ever go back. dirty fricking peasants that are all scammers. i hope they pakistan and india nuke each other.

    moving around inside the country is misery. maybe you will find it chill once you arrive of GOA or whatever, but I never want to go back.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What is it with upper middle class white girl going to India

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      ~~*holywood*~~ and a popular book made by a moron sold the idea to other morons (specially woman) that India is some spiritual place to "find yourself"

      I'm not entertaining a racist joke chud.

      ?si=dz1aJ5PoODHvAKBV

      >need a constant force of pajeets to keep the leopards in check
      >co-exist

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's called monitoring moron.
        If this isn't co-existence then what it is? American and African approach to conservation is very different to Indian one

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sabbatical's in India

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Sikkim is beautiful and underrated by foreigners. So is the rest of North East India.
      t. sir

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    very good

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I was working in India but we were allowed some travel on the weekends. Also because of my job I was enjoying the rich life of India with five star hotels and personal drivers. Anyway here are some of my experiences over there:
    >India is like a big jungle with jungle rules
    >can't drink any water that is not bottled
    >that also means you need to brush your teeth with bottled water
    >avoid street food like the plague. people meme it to be good but it's not
    >even if you eat in a fancy restaurant you still have a 5050 chance of getting some stomach disease so get fricking ready
    >I'm white so people instantly see me as a walking piggy bank which is very annoying. Its like people treat you good only because they know you'll tip them by the end of the day
    >traffic laws are almost non existent in rural areas. They are only partially followed in major cities like Delhi
    >you never have the right of way to cross so you have to move quickly and pray that someone wont hit you
    >it's not that bad because as crazy as it is the drivers don't drive fast in cities and do not do risky turns
    >In general indian people are pretty nice but culturally they live in the past, like straight out of the 90's
    >the weather is horrendous. Very hot and humid in the summer and cold in the winter
    >very very bad air pollution in the winter which sucks because traveling is nicer in the cold weather
    >lots of animals and dangerous ones as well, avoid at any cost
    >my colleague got dongue from a mosquito, that fricking sucked balls
    >scammers scam you but since everything is so cheap you don't even feel bad, might as well help this poor guy
    >you can haggle on everything, even people who say they wont haggle haggle, you can drop half the price on everything you but if you're persistent enough
    >most of the temples look the same, you've seen one you've seen them all but I've only been to three city's so I'm talking out of my ass
    >Indian food is very spicy, it's no wonder they shit all the time

    (1/2)

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >if you have a lot of money you're basically a god. You can afford everything, bribe anyone and enjoy India to the fullest
      >that chick in the OP is basically my mental state when I first arrived there but you get used to it after a few days. It's definitely a culture shock at first
      >people shit everywhere, there's also trash everywhere. Its very smelly and no one cares
      >people with degrees and high paying jobs still earn a little compared to a western countries. That's why most indians have never gone abroad, they simply can't afford it even with an above middle status job
      >I didn't have luck with the local female Indians. As far as I know there's not a hookup culture. Most people get arranged married with their family's help.
      >young tourists though, thats another story
      >lots of russians, Israelis and even Japanese
      >people speak English but only entry level. Even the people who speak high level English will still have trouble understanding you if you'll start using complicated words
      >they also have heavy accents which are hard to understand
      You'll like the country depending on what kind of person you are. If you are like the girl in the OP, you are used to life comforts and are not used to smelly, scammy, dirty, hot, humid, dangerous, rapey, dumb, places like India then you'll hate it but if you're the adventurous type who's confident and is able to handle the locals and just get high in a shitty bug infested hostel with loud obnoxious tourists, take a 12 hour train to some dense forest then hike to a monkey temple and then let some friendly locals take you down with their bike, then frick some local tourist horny girl then hell yea, you're gonna like it. I fall somewhere in the middle where I liked my time there as it was but I doubt I'll return there in the future.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The problem is that there is not much of a trade-off to the rapey-et al. characteristics of the country. I lived south of Kolkata with my ex-fiance's family for some time, traveled to Bay of Bengal, Kolkata etc. The negatived pointed out by you and others are true but what I was surprised by was the lack of biological/ecological diversity. Many rice fields, landscape dotted with tiny to mid-size towns that have literal garbage piles 8 ft high and 20ft in diameter with cows subsisting on the remnants. At temples in Kolkata, I saw feral dogs with prolapsed pussies. Indians have a tendency to burn their trash..plastic and all. Coming back into Kolkata from the Bay of Bengal made my lungs choke with chemicals from the smoke stacks. The list goes on dude..but yes..it's cheap.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Kolkata has a longstanding reputation as the filthiest and least-developed of India's Tier-1 cities. However, there are many neighborhoods--especially in South Kolkata--that have little to none of what you described.

          >the negatived pointed out by you and others are true but what I was surprised by was the lack of biological/ecological diversity.
          I'm being very serious in asking: if you actually lived "south of Kolkata," did you never take a single trip to another part of the state--let alone another region? Most of West Bengal falls within the Gangetic Plain, and has therefore been heavily farmed for many thousands of years. The constancy of the landscape shouldn't as any surprise.

          However, the northern tracts of the state encompass Darjeeling, the Himalayan foothills, and the Dooars (where I've personally seen everything from wild hogs to elephants and rhinoceroses). And there's just as much diversity in many other states: the Eastern Ghats dominate the eastern seaboard, and the Western Ghats dominate the western seaboard. Much of South India, including Kerala and Tamil Nadu, are fairly rugged and extremely green.

          Again: I agree that Kolkata, and its immediate surroundings, are ecologically underwhelming. Outside of the Sundarbans, there's no worthwhile nature closer than Similipal National Park in Odisha and the Ayodhya Hills in Purulia, on the West Bengal-Jharkhand border. And, while Jharkhand is also quite rural--I've moto-toured East and West Singhbhum districts extensively--it's not the safest place, particularly once you start edging toward Chaibasa and Goilkera.

          But, having said all that, India is literally categorized as a "megadiverse" nation.

          At risk of being redundant, I didn't ask what I asked in bad faith. I can very easily understand why some people don't like India, or wouldn't want to travel there. But saying there's a "lack of biological/ecological diversity" suggests you didn't really go anywhere outside of the Kolkata suburbs.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I mainly stayed in Kharagpur, which is a couple hours south of Kolkata, if I remember. Was in that direct area for most of the time which, outside of the city itself is surrounded by some houses and many, many medieval-esque stone huts. I found this pretty surprising/interesting. Rice fields galore. Occasionally we'd drive up to Kolkata with her parents(stopping or driving by many smaller towns in between which is where I am getting my sample size from, around 10-15 smaller towns/villages visited in this way). Then, I'd also travel to Sunderbans a few times which took an even longer drive to get to the coast, stopping less but seeing more. Once in a while we'd also stop, getting some sugar cane juice or coconuts on the side of the road to take a break from the chaotic roadways.
            You're right, though. I've never traveled beyond West Bengal/sunderbans. I was hoping for some kind of natural beauty to balance out the dire cultural side of the country (no offense if you're Indian..but there was more than once that I saw people just straight up punt feral dogs) but I guess that was just..everywhere other than where her family lived.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Lol, Kolkata is basically Bangladesh nowadays. Even Dhaka is much better than Kolkata and I'm an Indian.

          Kolkata has a longstanding reputation as the filthiest and least-developed of India's Tier-1 cities. However, there are many neighborhoods--especially in South Kolkata--that have little to none of what you described.

          >the negatived pointed out by you and others are true but what I was surprised by was the lack of biological/ecological diversity.
          I'm being very serious in asking: if you actually lived "south of Kolkata," did you never take a single trip to another part of the state--let alone another region? Most of West Bengal falls within the Gangetic Plain, and has therefore been heavily farmed for many thousands of years. The constancy of the landscape shouldn't as any surprise.

          However, the northern tracts of the state encompass Darjeeling, the Himalayan foothills, and the Dooars (where I've personally seen everything from wild hogs to elephants and rhinoceroses). And there's just as much diversity in many other states: the Eastern Ghats dominate the eastern seaboard, and the Western Ghats dominate the western seaboard. Much of South India, including Kerala and Tamil Nadu, are fairly rugged and extremely green.

          Again: I agree that Kolkata, and its immediate surroundings, are ecologically underwhelming. Outside of the Sundarbans, there's no worthwhile nature closer than Similipal National Park in Odisha and the Ayodhya Hills in Purulia, on the West Bengal-Jharkhand border. And, while Jharkhand is also quite rural--I've moto-toured East and West Singhbhum districts extensively--it's not the safest place, particularly once you start edging toward Chaibasa and Goilkera.

          But, having said all that, India is literally categorized as a "megadiverse" nation.

          At risk of being redundant, I didn't ask what I asked in bad faith. I can very easily understand why some people don't like India, or wouldn't want to travel there. But saying there's a "lack of biological/ecological diversity" suggests you didn't really go anywhere outside of the Kolkata suburbs.

          Spot on

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >vlog couple go to india
    >bf wants to go home back to work a week early
    >woman demands to stay to film content
    >woman books room in the cheapest most dangerous part of town
    >has staff in hotel trying to break door down to rape her, when she refuses to come out they call the phone in the room non stop until she unplugs it then they shut off her electric and wifi repeatedly for the rest of the week desperate to get her out of the room
    Lmao
    On return to india the bf immediately dumped her. Its fantastic actually.

    She still doesn't know what she did wrong and blames the bf for not being supportive. She gave up on israelitetube for like a year and now does onlyfans lmao
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6161607/American-blogger-stalked-sexually-assaulted-trapped-Indian-hotels.html
    Why are women so fricking dumb

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You can get a decent/3-4 star resort in India for 50-60 USD per night lol. If she's going dirt cheap then it's her fault.
      Business class, salaried Indians and people above them actively avoid poorgays.
      t. Indian

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeh watch her video, lmao
        >i cant believe the moment i landed in usa my long term bf dumped me
        How are women this delusional

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      lol holy shit

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        India sounds perfect for the white knight type, kek

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >woman books room in the cheapest most dangerous part of town
      Paharganj is by no means "the most dangerous part of town," especially in the context of Delhi and the NCR.

      It isn't a good neighborhood, by any means. But it is adjacent to Connaught Place, the New Delhi Railway Station (NDLS), and two metro stations (R.K. Ashram on the Blue Line, and New Delhi on the Yellow Line). So it has, for many years, had a reputation as a "tourist ghetto," and has long been popular with both traveling Indians and foreign tourists.

      All things considered, I'd bet Paharganj--at any given time--has the most significant concentration of foreign tourists in the entire country, with the possible exception of certain parts of Goa in December and January.

      Ofc, I'm not saying that it's an incredibly safe place. Given the concentration of tourists, there are also tons of touts and con artists--far more than you'll find anywhere else in the city, to the point where it can feel like you're being hassled non-stop if you're a first-time visitor and look the part. I also know a handful of (foreign and Indian) women have had issues being stalked and followed by strangers.

      Having said all that, I wouldn't be surprised if she did something stupid. I knew an attractive German woman who "almost got gang-raped" inside a fancy hotel. From what I was told, she'd gotten piss-drunk in a nightclub, invited a ton of Indian guys back to her room for an "after-party," and was then shocked when they thought she wanted them to run a train on her.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        No german woman gets drunk and invites a whole room of indian men back to her hotel room to privately continue partying. This is pajeet cope. Rape is the national sport there.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          We stayed in the same hostel for about two months, and that's exactly what happened. I didn't see this particular incident unfold first-hand, but I saw her do other overtly stupid things over the course of the same trip.

          Not relevant, but she also had a boyfriend in Germany who she talked to on the phone most nights (and whom she cheated on so often that her relationship became a running joke among other guests).

          instead of taking your missus to cultural and heritage sights, you can take her to Himalayas, Goa, Andaman & Nicobar, famous tiger reserves, Western Ghats and North East India. I'm North Indian but the only places worth visiting in North India are either the Himalayan states or Rajasthan. Rest is a shithole apart from upper middle class/posh areas of New Delhi, Chandigarh, Gurgaon and Noida. Amritsar is great for food.
          South India is better overall.

          Good advice, but not worth engaging with that anon--he's not going to visit India, and he's posting here for the sole purpose of being a right c**t.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'm Indian and so it's natural I will post good advice. I unironically want to you folks to have a good time here and avoid tourist traps as well poorgays Indians asking you for a photo if you're white by saying "saar/ma'am".
            I love wildlife of my country and want to share my insights so that you can enjoy the biodiversity and diverse geography of my country.
            Athithi Devo Bhava (guest is God)
            >pic related
            Tigress Ridhi from Ranthambore who is the current Queen of the Lakes

            PS: I'm still a beginner in photography with a 10+ year old Sony Alpha and a kit lens. Saving for an upgrade

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >I'm Indian and so it's natural I will post good advice. I unironically want to you folks to have a good time here and avoid tourist traps as well poorgays Indians asking you for a photo if you're white by saying "saar/ma'am"
              I'm not Indian, but I lived in India for many years. It may not be my country, but I understand the sentiment.

              >PS: I'm still a beginner in photography with a 10+ year old Sony Alpha and a kit lens. Saving for an upgrade
              I remember you from other threads.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I always thought it was quaint to get the photo requests..

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This was actually mentioned in the Lonely Planet guidebook for India. Cheap hotels that don't lock from the inside, with creepy staff barging in trying to see you naked. It seems prevalent in India.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I think Western shit like porn kind of destroyed India. They were probably all horny as frick before but getting easy access to watching depraved shit online was clearly not healthy. My mother is Indian and tells me that when she was young in the 70s and 80s, girls could walk around alone without any fear of being raped or anything. I went to Delhi with her and my sister once and saw so many guys eyeing them both up, it felt really uncomfortable.
      But on-topic, I recommend Rishikesh. I went there in 2023 and while it seemed like it pandered too much to foreigners like myself, it is a beautiful place and feels very spiritual. Would go back again but now I'm just saving up for another Japan trip kek
      If I like spiritual and sort of remote places, where else should I go? I went to Ooty with my parents once, they had their honeymoon in Darjeeling so I'd like to visit there too. Other than that I have no idea

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >my mother is indian
        >im a foreigner
        Clown world, rajesh.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I avoid Western women when i travel. They are humiliating.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I got the worst sickness ever in India. I didn't even venture off too far the beaten path, just did things like the Taj Mahal. Thought it might have been traveler's diarrhea but it lasted a lot longer. I still felt kind of shitty when I came back and had basically no energy for a month. Ever since then I've had strange food intolerances. I can't eat gluten, garlic, or anything remotely spicy or greasy. Doctors haven't been helpful. Still have the intolerances years later.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ive always wanted to see a few sites in india besides the whole country being a filthy disgusting dump. But i got married and there is absolutely no way i will ever go there now. Ill see taj mahal on youtube, without the smell and extreme diahhrea
      Its a shame because i love the food, but i couldnt eat any of it there without dying

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        instead of taking your missus to cultural and heritage sights, you can take her to Himalayas, Goa, Andaman & Nicobar, famous tiger reserves, Western Ghats and North East India. I'm North Indian but the only places worth visiting in North India are either the Himalayan states or Rajasthan. Rest is a shithole apart from upper middle class/posh areas of New Delhi, Chandigarh, Gurgaon and Noida. Amritsar is great for food.
        South India is better overall.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I would never let my wife board a plane to india or pakistan. Maybe sometime the next millenia your people will stop being so disgusting, stop stinking and stop raping but its in your dna. Perhaps india being a superpower already happened and the superpower is rape.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Don't worry tbh, we will come to your country to redeem.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Went to Taj Mahal
      You deserved it lol

      Yeh watch her video, lmao
      >i cant believe the moment i landed in usa my long term bf dumped me
      How are women this delusional

      Idc anymore tbh.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Did you take some killer antibiotic combo to nuke the sickness? They permanently change your gut flora.

      You can get a decent/3-4 star resort in India for 50-60 USD per night lol. If she's going dirt cheap then it's her fault.
      Business class, salaried Indians and people above them actively avoid poorgays.
      t. Indian

      >$50-60 per night
      Screw that. I thought India was cheap. I can get 3 star rooms here in highly developed Taiwan for $40. Just go to Kuala Lumpur, pay $30 for a high-rise studio, and enjoy all the Indian food you want in a far more sanitary setting.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >can get 3 star rooms here in highly developed Taiwan for $40. Just go to Kuala Lumpur, pay $30 for a high-rise studio, and enjoy all the Indian food you want in a far more sanitary setting.
        I'm not talking urban settings moron. Resorts in the countryside, where there's more nature.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Screw that. I thought India was cheap.
        Every large city in India has hundreds of thousands of people who would be at least upper-middle-class by Western standards. The prices of upscale hotels and resorts reflect the fact that India has more economic diversity than "impoverished street-shitter."

        You can still get a decent hotel in Delhi for between $25 and $35 per night (or slightly less, if you're willing to compromise on setting and stay somewhere like Paharganj). However, you're not going to find a good 4-star hotel or a lower-range 5-star hotel for under less than $100 per night. If all you're interested in is feeling like a "white god," as half the morons in these these threads seem to be--and almost none of whom seem to have traveled anywhere more exotic than their own backyard--you're best off going somewhere like Thailand or the Philippines, where there's an entire economy built around the needs of degenerate coomers and sexpests.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          35 a night for a shit hole hotel in india jessus christ. Even better countries are cheaper. Who would wanna go to expensive shitty india

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        He's kind of bullshitting. In New Delhi things are expensive but you could literally say that for any capital city. Can you get a nice hotel in Taipei for 40 dollars? Not really. Outside of Taipei you can. It's the same with India.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Some people come back from streetshitter land with multiple strains of salmonella and some nasty parasites. You're a fricking idiot if you didn't follow up on this properly.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    How desperate do you have to be to resort to India of all places, what the frick lol

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Brother have you not considered eastern Europe or SEA?

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Jaaaaanie

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Basically because a lot of posts started being solely focusing on that aspect so mods will delete it

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    because coomers seize every opportunity to share their sex laden larp stories
    blame them, not the mods

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Has anyone worked in India? Is it possible for an college educated American to find work there? I want to get lost on that subcontinent.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I drove a motorcycle from Delhi to tawang, a place in northeast India. Probably one of the most beautiful places I've ever seen. Second biggest Tibetan monastery with nice Himalayan background. It's a pain in the ass to get there though but no foreigners at all.

    Overall I would say India is around 20% horribly polluted and abject poverty, 70% just really boring with nothing to do in most places, and 10% of some of the most amazing sights and cultural diversity I've seen in my life. It's a travel that is really got super big highs and great lows.

    Right now I'm in guwahati which is a boring city, but places like nagaland and arunachal pradesh are mind boggling cool, with tons of local tribes, weird food, amazing landscapes and kind people. I really hated North India though.

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