Traveling to Thailand + Haneda airport

Going to Thailand in May, what should I do? I'd also like to mention 2 things. 1, it's a family trip with my parents and my 10 yr old sister so don't say any moronic shit like "frick some hookers anon". 2, I have an 8 hour overlay at the Haneda airport in Tokyo. Would SighSee recommend we wait at the airport or do you guys know any cool shit to do around that area. Thanks in advance anons.

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  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    An 8 hour layover with an entire family isn't really worth a spontaneous trip somewhere. I know there's a shrine near the airport that you could probably visit but 8 hours go pretty quick when you have to depend on other people to keep up.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Haneda is pretty central though. You can be in Shibuya in half an hour by taxi.

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    OP here, it says SighSee because I originally posted this is SighSee but quickly found out there was another board for posts like this and so I just copy and pasted my original comment into here, sorry bros.

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    8 hours isn’t enough to justify leaving. Especially if you flight is delayed, that 8 hours will be eaten into quickly. Sorry bro just cope at the airport.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I have left airports with only 3 hours between flights and I've been safe, but that's traveling alone.
      Traveling with family will slow you down, sure, but 8 hours are plenty to go get lunch in Shinagawa or whatever. It's Haneda, not Narita, you can go to Tokyo proper pretty easily.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >but 8 hours are plenty to go get lunch in Shinagawa or whatever. It's Haneda, not Narita, you can go to Tokyo proper pretty easily.
        yeah but there's no particular "cool shit to do" worth planning for such a short time as OP is trying to do
        8 hours is too long to cope at the airport but too short to do anything meaningful beyond just talking a walk and having some food somewhere, SPECIALLY when dragged down by a pair of boomers and a kid

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >3835▶

      Which part of Thailand anon? Northern, central, and southern Thailand are pretty different imo.

      >1, it's a family trip with my parents and my 10 yr old sister so don't say any moronic shit like "frick some hookers anon"


      How does a family decide that Thailand is where to go on vacation? I mean, it's fine, there's stuff to do there as a family, but are you sure your dad isn't planning on "accidently" having sex with a massage girl?

      You've got an 8 hour layover at Haneda. Are you sure they'll let you out? A few months ago I had a 10 hour layover at Narita and transfer passengers were not allowed to leave the terminal or exit through immigration. Maybe it's different now. Having recently come back into Japan through Narita, I can tell you that it will take at least 1 hour to get through immigration/customers, and longer if you arrive at a busy time. You should also be back at the airport 2 hours minimum before your next flight. So let's say 2 hours after you arrive, 2 hours before you depart, and 2 hours total of travel in and out of the city (to be safe). That gives you 2 hours to do something in Tokyo. Sure, you can do it, but it seems like a stretch. If you're going to leave the airport, maybe just look for a really nice sushi restaurant.

      Pattaya has a good beach and many nice resorts south of the city. The redlight areas are contained and either avoidable (you can steer your family around them without them knowing by just suggesting different places to go) and also easily visited (if you get an hour to yourself, you can find a girl/katoey for an experience much cheaper than your sushi lunch in Tokyo).

      Lmao imagine going to Thailand on a "family trip" as a grown man.

      >Going to Thailand in May, what should I do? I'd also like to mention 2 things. 1, it's a senpai
      sound idea

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      are you moronic, 8 hours is tons of time, the train is literally in the airport and will take you to the center of the city in 20 minutes

  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I would just spend the money to use the lounges there tbqh

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Which part of Thailand anon? Northern, central, and southern Thailand are pretty different imo.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      For what we have planned now, we're going to Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, Bangkok, and some beaches on the last days.
      I'd also like to mention I wanted to go to Pattaya but giving that place a google search does no justice. I'm just tryna see the lights. You know any things in Pattaya that anyone can do that evens out all the hookers?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        You can definitely make a day/overnight trip to Pattaya
        >Art in Paradise and/or Mini Siam for the kid
        >Big Buddha Temple
        >Sanctuary of Truth
        >beach front dinner at Surf and Turf
        >legit foot massages anywhere along Beach Road
        >listen to Enzo perform at Hops
        >ditch the family at Central Marina, Terminal 21 or the movies to head to
        >Soi 6 to frick some hookers anon

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        You've got an 8 hour layover at Haneda. Are you sure they'll let you out? A few months ago I had a 10 hour layover at Narita and transfer passengers were not allowed to leave the terminal or exit through immigration. Maybe it's different now. Having recently come back into Japan through Narita, I can tell you that it will take at least 1 hour to get through immigration/customers, and longer if you arrive at a busy time. You should also be back at the airport 2 hours minimum before your next flight. So let's say 2 hours after you arrive, 2 hours before you depart, and 2 hours total of travel in and out of the city (to be safe). That gives you 2 hours to do something in Tokyo. Sure, you can do it, but it seems like a stretch. If you're going to leave the airport, maybe just look for a really nice sushi restaurant.

        Pattaya has a good beach and many nice resorts south of the city. The redlight areas are contained and either avoidable (you can steer your family around them without them knowing by just suggesting different places to go) and also easily visited (if you get an hour to yourself, you can find a girl/katoey for an experience much cheaper than your sushi lunch in Tokyo).

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Do you want to coom in Pattaya or do you want to just see the beach? It’s an extremely popular destination for tourists, not just coomers.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Don't care to coom in Pattaya or anywhere for that matter. Like I said, I'm just trying to see all the nice lights and neon they got going on over there but from what I heard I think I also might try to convince the parents to use the beach days at Pattaya

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            If you truly don't care about the cooming and just want to see some neon signs then Chinatown in Bankgok would be more interesting

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Nice, I visit Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai all the time! Most anons only know about Pattaya and the other touristy places, so I'm glad you'll be taking some time to explore the humble yet wild north. Some things I've done up there that I can recommend:
        > Visit the mountains. Doi Inthanon is the highest, but I can vouch for Doi Sa Ngo. I had a good picture of the sunrise I saw there but I can't find it now. Anyways, mountain camping is also pretty popular in Thailand nowadays, though it's more of a wintertime activity.
        > Ride an elephant or (more ethically) visit an elephant sactuary. I've done both, these animals are truly beautiful and they're far more intelligent than the average Thai man/farang coomer.
        > Attend a Buddhist ceremony. Most monks will allow you inside their temples, and you can take pictures so long as you remain respectful. I personally would avoid any invitations to attend a sutra chanting though, they're very boring.
        > Go shopping at a night market. Chiang Mai is locally famous for its night market, just like how Bangkok is famous for its floating markets. Most of the vendors sell foodstuffs but you can also buy some cool souvenirs without the ripoff prices you'll find in Bangkok. If you don't know what to eat, just follow the long lines and point at menus.
        > Hike with the hill tribes. The most famous is the Karen Long Neck. I did this when I was little so I don't remember much, but there's no better way to explore the Zomia. You can read about it if you want, it's "a land without governance". The Moken are also pretty cool and are enjoying their own form of political liberation, but they're in southern Thailand.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          (2/2)
          Other than those activities, a lot of Thailand's appeal is food-related. I've attached the table of contents from Pok Pok by Andy Ricker, he goes over the best northern Thai dishes and you can use this to guide your culinary journey. Try to find pictures by googling if you can, if you can't I'll see what I can do. Also, if you're an adventurous eater, you can experience the pleasure and displeasure of trying the many unique proteins of the region (love me some snake, hate wasp larvae). Chiang Mai also has a booming coffee scene, some of the cafes are really stylish despite the north still being pretty rural.
          Personally, whenever I visit Thailand (usually once yearly in the winter), I like to chill and do redneck things like fish in the rice paddies or go on motorbike/pickup truck joy rides. And honestly, even though those sound pretty boring in writing, it really captures the spirit of Thailand as a whole. It's an easygoing country.
          Sorry, one more thing. There are definitely some things I would buy in Thailand to take back home, such as stuff that's just plain cheaper (Korean cosmetics, knockoff Chinese stuff that's 99% as good as the actual deal) and some unique things like retort curry pouches and special spices. Thai cooking is really spice-dependent, but that's the only real barrier. Once you can source your galangal/lemongrass/whatever you can replicate the food you had in Thailand back at home, and that helps keep the memories alive.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Thanks dude, a lot of those things sound pretty cool. I'll see what we're able to do, but more likely than not I think we WILL do most of those things considering the fun-ness of it while still being able to experience the culture.Once again, thanks anon.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              No problem! Hope you enjoy your trip.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        No need to go to Pattaya to take any other "sights" besides the prostitutes. Therr ae better beaches. Just go to Phuket, or Hua Hin, or one of the islands closer to Bangkok.

  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >1, it's a family trip with my parents and my 10 yr old sister so don't say any moronic shit like "frick some hookers anon"
    How does a family decide that Thailand is where to go on vacation? I mean, it's fine, there's stuff to do there as a family, but are you sure your dad isn't planning on "accidently" having sex with a massage girl?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Outside of a single white males (and now black male "passport bros), Thailand is a renown family and couples destination

  7. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Lmao imagine going to Thailand on a "family trip" as a grown man.

  8. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Haneda is on a subway line, you can shop FrancFranc and get a meal in Shibuya at tokyu hands. Don't forget to take a pic with the dog statue.

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