Western restaurants in non-Western countries

What's the weirdest thing you've ever encountered while trying to get a bite of something more familiar?

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    As a french going to the US, it was funny to eat at Olive Gardens.

    It was like retards trying to mimic european cuisine and ways.
    Like the waitress came to our table with a portable table just to toss a salad. Like it was some kind of ritual... In Europe, if you order a salad, you just get a salad in a plate, weither it's a posh restaurant or not.

    The food was kinda shit, but it had to be expected.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      CHECKED

      I bet you didn't know almost everything at Olive Garden is microwaved? Truly goyslop.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >They microwaved your salad

        College retards here to tell you retard shit they memorize from their retard commie professor

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >almost everything
          >ThEy MiCrOwAvEd ur SalAd bRo!
          reading comprehension> (You)

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >They microwave your salad , breadsticks and beer I paid $155,000 to learn that at Retard University

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              damn bro, you got scammed. you should have gone to dimwit uni for 55,000 quid cheaper

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, it felt microwaved.
        Overall, when you get out of Europe, even the good western style restaurants are the equivalent of school cafeterias here.

        Even Japan, they have good local food (sushis, takoyakis and so on), but their attempt at european food is pathetic. They hate strong tastes, so everyhthing is bland, they can have 20 different flavors of icecreams and all taste the same.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Europe gets most of its food from China and America, the stuff Americans won't eat because the FDA has high standards

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Europe gets most of its food from China and America, the stuff Americans won't eat because the FDA has high standards

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Hahahahhhahahahahahahhahahagagagaha I really hope this is bait

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      checked
      fwiw, no one except for supremely low IQ midwesterners think that Olive Garden is "authentic" Italian food. but for a lot of people in the US it's the closest they can get. go to any city with a population of 300k< and you'll generally find pretty good offerings of different euro, etc cuisines
      but for the folks in bumfuck Michigan? you can't sincerely expect that a chef or restauranteur of any caliber would travel there to open up shop....so olive garden is what they get

      • 1 month ago
        sage

        There are 3 types of italian food in America. There are italian restaurants specializing in what you would find in Italy in either northern or southern styles. There's italian-american, which is cuisine developed by southern italian immigrants in the NYC area around the turn of the 20th century adapting American ingredients to recipes they knew and there's places like Olive Garden, numerous pizza chains, etc. that have taken the latter and made it even more mass-market and watered down. These tend to emphasize quantity over quality (Olive Garden typically promotes their all-you-can-eat items). Where I live we have all 3 kinds but eating at Olive Garden in particular is regarded as a sign that you're a fat cow with no taste.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >but for the folks in bumfuck Michigan? you can't sincerely expect that a chef or restauranteur of any caliber would travel there to open up shop
        Bitch, please, there are good quality "foreign" restaurants all over the U.S.

        One of the best Italian restaurants I've ever eaten in was in Bangkok, started by a high-end Italian chef who retired there. Another was in bumfuck, Tennessee, started by Iranian immigrants because why the fuck not.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You’re not wrong, anon. I’ve eaten great Italian in bumfuck northern Arkansas. Those kind of places are the exception and not super common though.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Italian restaurants in the USA are actually better than ones in Italy since the ingredients are better and they are run by Italians. Over in Italy restaurant workers are all Chinese, Romanian and African

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Italian restaurants in the USA are actually better than ones in Italy
              hahaha, fuck you.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Mary Maestri's in Tontitown?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >there are good quality "foreign" restaurants all over the U.S.
          This is true. I had some food from an amazing Italian restaurant last week. You won't find immigrants (and thus their food) everywhere, though. I don't think there is a single good Mexican place in the entire Midwest.

          Italian restaurants in the USA are actually better than ones in Italy since the ingredients are better and they are run by Italians. Over in Italy restaurant workers are all Chinese, Romanian and African

          >Italian restaurants in the USA are actually better than ones in Italy
          This is not true, and you'd know it if you went to Italy.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Chicago has delicious Mexican food, but that is more of an exception. I'm in a midsize Midwest city, within the past several years many taco trucks opened, some are quite good. Actual restaurants that are Mexican are at best mediocre and typically are bad. I would guess most Midwestern cities will have some good taco trucks.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >You won't find immigrants (and thus their food) everywhere, though. I don't think there is a single good Mexican place in the entire Midwest.
            The first part of your statement is undeniably true; I am old, and I remember well that just 20 or so years ago you couldn’t get edible Mexican food in New York City, which, love it or hate it is generally a pretty serious food town where you can get almost anything. They just didn’t have sufficient Mexicans. Even now NYC is better for high-end regional fancy Mexican than it is for basic taquerias. On the other hand, I think the West Coast only got its first decent bagels about a decade ago.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Santo domingo in D.R has Kfc, Burger king and all of that

    for some reason it tastes like garbage and its as much if not more expensive as in the US

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They don't call it a quartner ounder with cheese, but a mcroyal with cheese abroad. It was really cool.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Americans trying to copy european food is hilarious. I was at a pretty expensive restaurant on the west coast once, they tried to be snooty like they were some Michelin star restaurant or some shit, but their salt and "mustard" (if you could call that mustard) was in sachets! SACHETS!!! kek

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You traveled to America for good food (wise) but ate at Jollibee (dumb) not my problem

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Michelin Stars aren't necessarily synonymous with quality. They often do go hand-in-hand, but it's not a direct correlation. You can actually find cheap, lower-quality restaurants that have Michelin Stars.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Was that in 2020? There was a big scare about the spread of covid through contaminated surfaces like a salt shaker and restaurants all started using disposable items. Fortunately that ended.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty much any "western" restaurant in Japan.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've been to a Spanish restaurant in Hong Kong. It wasn't authentic, but it tasted good nonetheless.
    >first course: tuna tataki with wasabi aioli (clearly not Spanish, but I liked it)
    >second course: soup
    >main course: paella, which was probably the most Spanish thing on the menu
    >dessert: inverted ice cream cone on a plate with chocolate sprinkles, Oreo crumbles, condensed milk, and mini-marshmallows on the side. There was also a heart-shaped Belgian waffle topped with Oreos & a brownie
    All of the above was for a single prix fixe menu.

    I also ordered a flight of beer, which was just three glasses of Estrella Damm with different fruit flavoring (melon, strawberry, pineapple).

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