What are some thoughts on the East Coast (USA)?

What are some thoughts on the East Coast (USA)?

I am currently in Texas and thought I wanted to move to Colorado but the more I look into it, Colorado looks like a dump. I moved away from Utah before Texas and I feel Colorado will just feel similar to me. I also thought I wanted to live on the PNW, but suddenly I'm looking at the East Coast (Massachusetts or somewhere near)

What are some pros and cons? The most appealing thing to me is that it looks like I can hop in the car and experience so many things within a day trip's distance. Unlike Texas where I can drive for four hours and not see shit. The historical aspect is also appealing as well as the train system connecting many important landmarks.

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  1. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    sounds like you're mostly interested in the Northeast which is probably the best choice in my opinion.
    expect more aggression from random people than you've ever experienced. not saying you'll have constant altercations but I do find people on the East Coast to generally have a more aggressive attitude than the rest of the country.
    Northeast will have brutal winters, but it's better than living anywhere South of Maryland because the rest of the East Coast is swampy as frick.
    not sure if you play the racial politics game, but the East Coast will be a substantially blacker area than what you're used to. could be a pro or con dependent on your persuasion.
    traffic is going to suck but that applies to most of the areas in the US people want to live in.
    other than that I generally agree with your stated reasons for considering the Northeast. There's a higher density of shit to see, higher likelihood of finding usable public transportation, a lot of pretty terrain, and you're very close to the Canadian border and plenty of good international airports if you'd like to head out of the country.
    If you end up not being a winter person, Raleigh, NC may be worth checking out. lived there for a couple years because of work and overall it's a growing city with a friendly vibe. lots of tech jobs there and 3 pretty large universities so it has a ton of younger people moving in

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Spot on about the aggression. Boston and NYC people are genuinely angry constantly. There's a reason people from Mass are called Mbuttholes. First time I went to Boston I watched two business men shoulder check each other as they passed each other in a Starbucks and just kept walking like that's normal. Now I call that the Boston hello.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah, I've heard that a lot about aggression. I would probably not be in Boston but maybe somewhere about 30 mins to an hour out. I'm not a big city person no matter how hard I try to pretend I am.

      I'm glad you confirmed my suspicion about having a lot of cool shit to do within a days trip distance. I'm in Austin so my options are just other Texas cities within 5 hours from here. If I were to move to the Denver area like I originally planned my options would be very limited.

      Being close to Boston/New York/Canada/Maine, Rhode Island and having a nice transit system to get around sounds like a dream for somebody who's only option is to drive 1 hour to San Antonio and 3 hours to Houston and Dallas

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        The only time New Englanders aren't aggressive is Christmas time. Any other time, you may as well buy a mean-looking dog, cause he'll seem nicer than a Mbutthole, or their gayer twin the Connecticut dickwad.
        Mainers are the rednecks of the north with moose lodge memberships and xenophobia.
        Vermont has good cheese, that's it. The people will let you know quickly how much they think they are better than you, undeserving of it.
        New Hampshire is full of depressed people.
        Delawarians are bipolar.
        Rhode Island has an inferiority complex, but they may be the nicest New Englanders.
        You're a Texan OP, I think you'd fit the best in Pennsylvania or upstate NY, etc. PA's got all the things you're describing and they like Southerners.

        sounds like you're mostly interested in the Northeast which is probably the best choice in my opinion.
        expect more aggression from random people than you've ever experienced. not saying you'll have constant altercations but I do find people on the East Coast to generally have a more aggressive attitude than the rest of the country.
        Northeast will have brutal winters, but it's better than living anywhere South of Maryland because the rest of the East Coast is swampy as frick.
        not sure if you play the racial politics game, but the East Coast will be a substantially blacker area than what you're used to. could be a pro or con dependent on your persuasion.
        traffic is going to suck but that applies to most of the areas in the US people want to live in.
        other than that I generally agree with your stated reasons for considering the Northeast. There's a higher density of shit to see, higher likelihood of finding usable public transportation, a lot of pretty terrain, and you're very close to the Canadian border and plenty of good international airports if you'd like to head out of the country.
        If you end up not being a winter person, Raleigh, NC may be worth checking out. lived there for a couple years because of work and overall it's a growing city with a friendly vibe. lots of tech jobs there and 3 pretty large universities so it has a ton of younger people moving in

        >the East Coast will be a substantially blacker area than what you're used to.
        Very much depends on the size and feel of the place. He needs to stay the hell outta Philly and the whole state of NJ if this is a problem. Hell, everybody needs to avoid that hellscape, nuff said.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >substantially blacker area than what you're used to. could be a pro or con dependent on your persuasion.
      What possible persuasion could make that a pro? If he's Jeffrey Dahmer? Even blacks would consider it a con.

  2. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Massachusetts
    Ononono
    You don't want to do that.
    Don't go any further than Appalachia.

  3. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Coastal Maine is comfy, I forget some shitty YouTube video explained people from the south are nice, but no kind. Meaning they will say hello etc but secretly judge you and be shitty behind your back. Folks in the northeast may initially be reserved or not nice, but will will help you change a flat tire while saying"the fricks the matter without you don't know how to change a fricking tire?"

    There is some truth to that, I would take gruff New England kindness over superficial southern niceties any day.

  4. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm in a similar place, OP. Metaphorically, I mean, actually I live in Missouri. But I've had idle thoughts about moving to another state for a long time. I hear the east coast is beautiful, and I've got a good friend from college who lives in Virginia.

    I try not to get swept up by how green the grass looks on the other side of the fence/state line, but I don't like Missouri. Best that can be said for it is that we have caves for spelunking and a low cost of living. I want to give moving to another state more serious consideration now because I'll probably be done paying off my student loans within a year.

    Maybe more than anything else, I'm tired of having to drive two hours minimum every time I want to go anywhere that isn't a Walmart or gas station. I COULD move up to Saint Louis, but that just feels like half-assing it. If I'm gonna uproot myself anyway, I might as well move somewhere further.

    Anyway uh yeah no real advice except avoid Missouri, it sounds like it's just Texas-lite but you already weren't considering MO anyway. I'm just vibing with your mood and hoping to find some good advice while I'm here.

  5. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Stay the frick out texass
    New England is nice because we don't have to deal with you

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Exactly. Stay the frick away you Texican mutts

  6. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    1/This is kind of a hard question to answer because you didn't specify what attributes you were looking for besides short travel distances and historical aspects. Yes Google maps says the drive from Miami, Florida to Portland, Maine is ~ 24s hrs so regardless of where you choose to live on the east coast you can get to any distance in under a days worth of travel. And yes, due to the east coast being colonial states there's a lot of history here if you dig that kind of thing.

    But I feel like there's a lot of variation between regions too which makes it even more difficult to answer. But if I had to surmise I'd say, anywhere around the mid-Atlantic (New York, Philly, DC) expect a shit ton of urban sprawl. South Carolina and below expect it to be swampy and muggy as frick. Further you go north the harsher the winters (no shit). Appalachians are kino if you're an outdoorsy type looking for beautiful natural landscapes, but it's a much poorer place. As far as living on the coast what is there to say? It's a beach you do beachy things there. A lot boomers move there when they retire, at least in NC where I'm from. The cost of living is going to be much higher above the mason dixon. I had a former colleague from Massachusetts who came down here to work and would routinely talk about how everything down here was cheaper. We would always poke fun at her because onetime she said spending 20 bucks for a plate of food wasn't a lot of money. The only meaningful political divide is going to be between urbanites and ruralites. Someone from upstate New York, rural PA, or rural GA will have more politically in common than someone from upstate New York and someone from NYC. Just look at the electoral maps. The southerner/yankee divide is really just for ball busting banter or old sentimental boomers stuck in the past who still think it's a meaningful distinction. So yeah, just to reiterate real cultural/political divisions are going to fracture on rural vs urban.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      2/Avoid the black belt in the South East like the plague. I've worked there for a short period of time and it was hell on earth. I can't think of any redeeming qualities, not one. Riddled with crime, insane poverty, little economic opportunities, most of it's just desolate farm land, and it doesn't even have appealing natural scenery to make up for it. (like I said the Appalachians are poor and don't have many economic opportunities either but at least it's low crime and has natural beauty). I'm not kidding, it will eat away at your soul. Don't go there. Most economic opportunities worth their salt will be around major metropolitan areas, like anywhere else in the country. So yeah I don't think I missed anything, touched on the economics, political/cultural variations, natural and meteorological conditions.... I think that's everything.

      Coastal Maine is comfy, I forget some shitty YouTube video explained people from the south are nice, but no kind. Meaning they will say hello etc but secretly judge you and be shitty behind your back. Folks in the northeast may initially be reserved or not nice, but will will help you change a flat tire while saying"the fricks the matter without you don't know how to change a fricking tire?"

      There is some truth to that, I would take gruff New England kindness over superficial southern niceties any day.

      >There is some truth to that, I would take gruff New England kindness over superficial southern niceties any day.
      I don't think this is true, and I don't think there's anyway to empirically measure this unless you can read people's minds. I mean how do you know they're "secretly judging you", you would never know if it's done 'secretly' lol. But I'm a southerner so I guess I'm just partial to my own people.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not OP, but

      >The cost of living is going to be much higher above the mason dixon.
      Can you dodge the highest living costs by living in one of the smaller cities (without going full rural hicksville) or is it gonna cost an arm and a leg for a small locker no matter where you go up there?

      Does the cost of living trend downward the further south you go until spiking when you hit Florida?

  7. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I’ve lived in Massachusetts my entire life. I hate it and can’t wait to get the frick out of here. It’s literally more expensive to live in Boston than it is to live in LA. There’s nothing to do here and the people suck.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      +1, don’t move here unless you get into Harvard Medical School or something. That being said, you could do a lot worse in terms of places to raise a family than somewhere like Georgetown or Wellesley (if you can afford it). That comes with the caveat that you are never more than a 30 minute drive away from some shithole filled with Dominicans.

  8. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I spent most of my life in Pennsylvania but I’ve also lived in New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Maryland. I might try New England one day but I don’t really have any desire to move elsewhere in the United States. The biggest con is obviously the cost of living if you’re in one of the major metro areas, but I’m currently paying $800/mo for my 1400 Sq Ft. 1 br 1.5 ba in small town Pennsylvania so it really just depends. Most states get hammered on taxes.

  9. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    The more north you go, the nicer it gets. Look for a job inBoston, and commute from one of the Downeaster stations in NH or ME.

    Avoid Philadelphia, unless you're just going for a weekend trip. Avoid Baltimore and Camden at all costs.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is bullshit.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        No, it tracks. The further north you go the less brown and black and ~~*you know*~~ it gets so things inevitable are much more peaceful and livable.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          If you want to avoid non-whites, this is an excellent map. However, not all White counties are great places to live. The rural counties especially are often economically depressed, hooked on pills, and hostile to newcomers. The cultural divide between the Maine coast and inland Maine is incredible.

  10. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >t. grew up on the East Coast, traveled New England in summer 2021, currently live @8000 ft in Colorado.
    Colorado's mountain towns are some of the nicest places to live in America. Summers are mild and never muggy, with rain showers frequently refreshing the afternoons. Winter brings plentiful snow and ski opportunities. You will pay through the nose to rent a place in the mountains, until you build local connections. You might have to fight for a free camping spot with 1000 other tourists and campers in the meantime. Yes, the Front Range cities are overpriced and full of traffic, smog and buttholes. Hot as hell in mid-summer, bitterly cold in winter. Half the city goes to the mountains every weekend, making for epic traffic jams. If you hate humidity and like year-round sunshine, Colorado is a great place to be.
    Colorado and Utah are very much different, with the population centers of both states being separated by hundreds of miles of rugged terrain. Colorado is far more politically progressive and non-religious, with a substantial Latino population in much of the state.
    The New England coastal region is the most civilized part of America. Top of the list in every social criteria. Sprawl is minimal, and cities are among the most walkable in America. Wealthy New England girls are beautiful and stylish. (Colorado girls love outdoor activity and go for a simple look, regardless of affluence: ballcap, T-shirt and shorts.) But the New England weather sucks balls, worse than Colorado. You have hot humid summers and frigid, snowy winters, with rainstorms lasting days on end in between. If you hate rain and snow, New England is NOT the place to live. In my travels I've found New Englanders to be kind, moral people, though they have a direct manner of speaking and clipped accent that often comes off as rude. Most have leftist political views as well.

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