What countries, if you travel to them, can affect your ability to travel to another country?

For example, traveling to Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, or Syria (and maybe more) makes it more difficult to get a tourist visa to the US.

Are there more examples of this? Thanks.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Any ties with Pakistan will get you a major issue with Indian visa. No joke. Even if you were born in USA, with USA parents, live in USA your whole life, never set foot in Pakistan, you will still potentially get visa denied if your grandfather is from Pakistan. You need to declare in form.

    And any ties with China may cause more document requirements for Taiwan visa.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Potentially all, we've seen that stamps can retroactively result in a travel ban. See Russian stamps for entry into Ukraine. If not outright banned, loads of countries ask about countries you've visited previously in their visa application forms without explanation what they use this info for and may contribute to visa refusal. There are also plenty of tales out there of people being questioned or refused entry based on passport stamps or that after getting in trouble with the authorities found that passport stamps were used against them in questioning.

    The famous one is Israel, though rules have relaxed in many places, many muslim countries still have an issue with proof of travel to Israel. The US has a published blacklist of countries that revoked ESTA and require you to apply for a visa. China visa is more likely to be rejected if you've been to certain muslim countries. And there are, though not countries, all kinds of disputed territories that may impact your travel. Two examples that spring to mind are proof of a visit to Artsakh, resulted in issues getting into Azerbaijan and Ukraine considering a visit to Crimea after the Russian take over in 2014 illegal entry of the country (not sure that ever had any real world consequences)

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >The famous one is Israel,
      israel has not stamped passports for several years for this reason
      for countries that do not recognise israel, it is possible to travel there via a third country
      example, malaysia does not recognise israel and normally malaysians are not allowed to visit but i know a couple of christian malaysians who have been to jerusalem. they went via somewhere in europe i think
      i guess if they had lost their passports while they were there, they would have been a bit fricked

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I would imagine countries that aren't internationally recognized, which is probably why they don't stamp or stamp on a separate piece of paper?

    Entering Transnistria, the visa was a small piece of paper that had to be returned at the end of your stay. If I remember correctly, the Artsakh entry stamp was on a sticker, so you could decide to stick it in your passport or not. If you did, you wouldn't've been able to visit Azerbaijan on that passport though.

    Also, if you travel to Northern Cyprus through Turkey, you won't be able to visit Cyprus, as you entered the country illegally. Apparently no problem whatsoever to travel from Cyprus to Northern Cyprus and back.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Also, if you travel to Northern Cyprus through Turkey, you won't be able to visit Cyprus, as you entered the country illegally.
      Only for non-EU citizens. EU citizens can't be denied entry.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    India to Pakistan or vice versa is another one.

    I've had to deal with this, particularly with Israel travel and more frequent travel to the Middle East (UAE & Saudi). The US allows you to have 2 active passports if you intend to travel to "conflict countries" Your primary passport (as an adult) is 10 years validity, and if you get a secondary, the expiration is in 4 years.

    Of course, this only applies if either of the countries you intend to visit are themselves adversaries and not enemies of the US.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know the details or have any first-hand experience, but I've heard that having evidence of visiting Israel in your passport will likely prevent you from being admitted to some countries. Apparently it doesn't have to be an Israeli stamp, e.g. having an Egyptian stamp from a border crossing with Israel would be enough to disqualify you.

    Novelty stamps can get you into some heat, any novelty stamp could cause issues but some more than others. Korean DMZ tours will take you to a non-functional railway station that has novelty stamps showing you're leaving that train station for Pyongyang. According to a guide I spoke to, some people have had issues entering other countries with that stamp (she didn't say which countries but hinted it was the US).

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Entering Serbia after Kosovo.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Is this always an issue? I've heard that entering Serbia directly from Kosovo can cause problems, but is it a problem if you were to go (for example) from Kosovo to North Macedonia and then to Serbia?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I've heard that entering Serbia directly from Kosovo can cause problems
        The Serbia-Kosovo border is functionally unidirectional. You can't enter Serbia from Kosovo, but you can enter Kosovo from Serbia, apparently.

        >is it a problem if you were to go (for example) from Kosovo to North Macedonia and then to Serbia?
        This one is a mixed bag. You can either be denied entry -OR- you can be approved but they "cancel" your Kosovo stamp (pic related). It's basically at the whim of the border guard, I can't find anything more solid.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I did this exact journey last summer. Since Albania, Kosovo and North Macedonia have moved away from physical stamps towards digital methods, the Serbian border police saw no Kosovo stamps and therefore I had no issue entering.

        Entering Kosovo from Albania and continuing onwards, however, would see you refused entry at the Kosovo-Serbia border and give you significant trouble at other border points too.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A couple of guys have mentioned Artsakh/Nagorno-Karabakh, but even having visited Armenia proper would also ban you from Azerbaijan. If you're one of those country-counting type of travelers, it's usually recommended to visit Azerbaijan first, then Armenia. Armenia has no problem with prior visitors to Azerbaijan.
    Additionally, if you're of detectable Armenian descent (ie. you have an Armenian surname), you could still be banned from Azerbaijan, even if you've never touched Armenian soil in your life.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It really depends on your nationality. I have travelled to Iraq, Somalia, Sudan, North Korea, Iran and much more. As a Canadian sometimes I get stopped and questioned extensively. But travel to the USA is no problem as Canadians are not required to get an etsa. For other nationalities they have to do interviews to get into the USA. An Irish friend had to do this after our trip to Iran.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Did you visit Iraq-proper, or did you visit the part of Iraq that claims to be Kurdistan? Apparently a lot of people visit Kurdistan, but I've never heard of anyone actually visiting real Iraq unless it was military service.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Iraq isn't impossible to travel to, you can take a guided tour to Baghdad, I would recommend it if your interested in visiting as many countries as possible like I am. I would not drink the tap water (drink bottle water only) but the food is amazing.

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    Anonymous

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