Would attempting to travel across Scotland and camp in the wild be a bad idea?

Would attempting to travel across Scotland and camp in the wild be a bad idea?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    why don’t you just take a tour of the highlands and go up to Inverness

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The environment is harsh, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad idea. Just go well equipped, including gaiters, free standing tent and a bug net.

      Why do tourists go to Inverness? It’s about as culturally interesting a town as Gary, Indiana and it’s close to nothing and on the way to nothing, other than Scotland’s most mediocre loch

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        cause they tell us to

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >It’s about as culturally interesting a town as Gary, Indiana
        that's not true, gary produced michael jackson

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Frick off. My castle is there.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          source?

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    That depends on the weather, your equipment, and your experience.

    You could have the time of your life. You could need to be airlifted to safety before you die of hypothermia.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lmao it’s Scotland not Nepal I done Ben Nevis in sliders mate relax

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nepal has more teahouses than Scotland

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is wild even a thing over there in the land of manicured forests?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      it's possible and people do it but it's arduous, and the terrain and weather can both be extreme.
      the scottish national trail crosses the entirety of scotland.
      though more popular is the shorter cape wrath trail which crosses most of the highlands.

      go to the britSighSee thread on SighSee for more specific advice. there is people on there who are very experienced at trekking in scotland.

      a surprising amount of people die in the scottish highlands. usually caught out by the extremely variant weather conditions.
      other than that, it's very boggy and rough. it's a very hard environment to hike in, especially long distances. a lot of trails in scotland there isn't even a visible trail.
      it's nothing like the nice graded trails you find on west coast US or in the Alps.

      https://www.scottishnationaltrail.org.uk/
      https://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/cape-wrath-trail.shtml

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not really. There's no real flora or fauna, just vast estates with managed deer stocks. That's why it genuinely surprises me to hear people talk about Scotland as a 'wild' place.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Even the most intensively managed estates are beautiful. I’ve been to almost every area of Scotland and my favorite area by far is a little glen near a shooting lodge in Angus.
        Keep in mind the landscape wasn’t altered just yesterday; they burned the forest down during the Iron Age. That means the ecosystem has had eons to re-adapt and recover in a new way compatible with the presence of humans.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >There's no real flora or fauna,
        thats complete and utter nonsense.
        and i say that as an englishman.
        the only thing more cringe than ultra-patriotic scots is ultra-self deprecating scots.

        scotland has limited bio-diversity relatively speaking but, still has some very special habitats.
        Cairngorms has amazing Caledonian woodlands and sub-artic plateau with a lot of amazing flora and fauna. As

        Even the most intensively managed estates are beautiful. I’ve been to almost every area of Scotland and my favorite area by far is a little glen near a shooting lodge in Angus.
        Keep in mind the landscape wasn’t altered just yesterday; they burned the forest down during the Iron Age. That means the ecosystem has had eons to re-adapt and recover in a new way compatible with the presence of humans.

        says even managed sporting estates have a lot of amazing wildlife and habitats within them.
        Scotland has one of the largest populations of Golden eagles in western europe, for example.

        Scotlands hills might look barren and empty but once you actually get amongst them you realise they are teaming with life. Gold Eagles, Sea eagles (and lots of other birds of prey and birds in general), Hares, Ptarmigans, Pinemartins, Lizards, Frogs, Badgers, Foxes, Capercaillies etc etc
        Not to mention the abundance of insects.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          The majority of those species are reintroduced. Like

          Is wild even a thing over there in the land of manicured forests?

          says, the woodlands are replanted and managed, and the wildlife is almost non-existent. I'm not saying that you can't travel around and see interesting things, and places like Skye - almost wholly treeless - are certainly beautiful in a geological sense, but on the whole the notion of a 'Scottish wilderness' is an oxymoron.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'm curious, are you a Scot? If not, you'd be the first outsider I've heard of being unimpressed by Scottish wildness.
            I suppose one could argue all day over what constitutes 'wilderness' but my personal standard is somewhere I can drink out of clear streams and feel alone for days on end. Setting a standard for no human impact disqualifies a lot more places than you'd realize.
            Also talking about wildlife being 'non-existent' is nonsense; if you want me to list all the cool birds and animals I see on a typical outing, I'll be happy to.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      No, seems fine. I've done it at campsites instead in the wild. Because toilets and showering. It was during July, so you won't die from the cold.

      sheep, deer and bunnies

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