Abscond to Africa

What does it take to move to Africa without being tethered to the US? I ask as I have family there and ultimately want to be outside of a place with US extradition in case stuff hits the fan.

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  1. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Spill the beans. . . what did you do OP?

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nothing, I'm just uber paranoid

      Give it back jaamal.

      Only if you wypipo give me reparations cracka

      There's no real extradiction in most african countries that don't have a significant white population.

      The border security most certainly will ask for a bribe if they find out that there's an international arrest warrant on you.

      What level of income and standard of living are you looking to support?

      I work as an electrician for around 55,000 a year, but I think that's just about the average income for where I live in the US. I'd like to live frugally in Africa, not trying to get a harem or anything.

  2. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Give it back jaamal.

  3. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    There's no real extradiction in most african countries that don't have a significant white population.

    The border security most certainly will ask for a bribe if they find out that there's an international arrest warrant on you.

    What level of income and standard of living are you looking to support?

  4. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >What does it take to move to Africa without being tethered to the US?
    Where, exactly? As you may know, there are 53 countries in Africa. Immigration laws are going to vary more than a little.
    >I have family there
    In Africa? I would probably ask them for advice. But I assume that having a familiar connection to whatever unspecified African country you’re considering running away to will probably make it easier to immigrate. Unless you mean family in the US, in which case I have no idea what you mean.
    >ultimately want to be outside of a place with US extradition
    This varies, again, by country, but I suspect that the poster above who thinks there are few Africa-US extradition treaties is probably right. Some probably do, most probably don’t. But I can’t even look it up without a country to refer to.
    >in case stuff hits the fan
    Usually when idiots on this site talk about “stuff hitting the fan,” they’re talking about the total societal collapse they agree with their prepper Telegram group or Discord is happening any minute now; I don’t know if I’ve ever seen it used to refer to impending arrest for crimes before. A bit confusing, but a nice change.

    Depending on exactly what shit is hitting exactly which fan in which country or countries, you will either escape forever, get extradited and put on trial in the US, extraordinarily rendered to a black site regardless of extradition status, or something else. Hope this helps!

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      But to offer a semi-serious response to an absurd vague question, regarding no longer being tethered to the US:

      In general, the way to no longer be tethered to the US is to acquire another citizenship and renounce American citizenship. Each of these processes can be made more or less difficult by many different factors--very wealthy people I know who hold both Swiss and American citizenship recently gave up trying to renounce their US citizenship after years of bureaucratic roadblocks, because US authorities deliberately make it very hard for HNW individuals to renounce, because overseas taxpayers are a cash cow. It's also next to impossible to successfully renounce US citizenship without procuring another citizenship first, although, amazingly, it is not specifically against US law to render yourself stateless. But neither your host country nor your birth country is going to want you to do it, because stateless people are a liability to both. It's also a shitty and unsustainable way to live--say goodbye to ever traveling again, and to accessing any kind of services from any government anywhere, among many other new hassles.

      Acquiring a new citizenship varies by difficulty, expense level, and country. Some places will never take you. Some places (fewer by the day, for better or worse) will straight-up sell you citizenship for cash (or "investment.") And most places will allow you to apply to naturalize after some period of being a legally resident, productive member of society. Sometimes marrying a local can speed the process, but less than you think.

      There's a whole ecosystem of specialist lawyers, of varying degrees of sleaziness, who dedicate their whole careers to this sort of thing. I got an ad in some social feed just yesterday inviting me to a seminar on renunciation, and most people here have probably seen the hustlers who specialize in shilling citizenships by investment; those folks have stables of lawyers who can help people through it.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      But to offer a semi-serious response to an absurd vague question, regarding no longer being tethered to the US:

      In general, the way to no longer be tethered to the US is to acquire another citizenship and renounce American citizenship. Each of these processes can be made more or less difficult by many different factors--very wealthy people I know who hold both Swiss and American citizenship recently gave up trying to renounce their US citizenship after years of bureaucratic roadblocks, because US authorities deliberately make it very hard for HNW individuals to renounce, because overseas taxpayers are a cash cow. It's also next to impossible to successfully renounce US citizenship without procuring another citizenship first, although, amazingly, it is not specifically against US law to render yourself stateless. But neither your host country nor your birth country is going to want you to do it, because stateless people are a liability to both. It's also a shitty and unsustainable way to live--say goodbye to ever traveling again, and to accessing any kind of services from any government anywhere, among many other new hassles.

      Acquiring a new citizenship varies by difficulty, expense level, and country. Some places will never take you. Some places (fewer by the day, for better or worse) will straight-up sell you citizenship for cash (or "investment.") And most places will allow you to apply to naturalize after some period of being a legally resident, productive member of society. Sometimes marrying a local can speed the process, but less than you think.

      There's a whole ecosystem of specialist lawyers, of varying degrees of sleaziness, who dedicate their whole careers to this sort of thing. I got an ad in some social feed just yesterday inviting me to a seminar on renunciation, and most people here have probably seen the hustlers who specialize in shilling citizenships by investment; those folks have stables of lawyers who can help people through it.

      Thanks Anon, sorry for the vague question. My birth family lives in Congo (DRC). I ask all of this because more and more I yearn for the (more dangerous, sure) life in Africa. I guess people will always be drawn to their birthplace after all.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Avoiding extradition means having some ties to the country or they can just deport your ass for overstaying your visa, basically being an illegal immigrant, irrespective of you being wanted elsewhere. So you could obtain DRC citizenship through lineage but holy frick a DRC passport is probably the least desirable in the world, very few countries like to admit DRC citizens for tourism or business and it's difficult to get from DRC to anywhere else in the world without going through places like Paris or Dubai that would arrest you if you were wanted elsewhere.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Be sure to come back and regale us with tales of how life is in the Congo dude.

  5. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    I'm not white and didn't get down like that during my time at Congo, so unfortunately, I can't give you personal examples. But I don't think the coom scene is as developed or accepted as much as say the Philippines. Whenever I heard of women giving favors to men, it was done to provide for their families. Within the conservative areas, you'd be especially hard pressed to get it on unless you know the in to some secret nightclub.

    Be sure to come back and regale us with tales of how life is in the Congo dude.

    Will do. When I was young I spent much of my time in the more American-ized international areas that were safer. It'd be interesting to see how the place changed since then and explore the less gated sections of the country. The biggest thing I remember back then was school being closed for a while due to missile warnings. Makes you wish it were a snowday instead, eh?

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      If you were actually born in Congo to one or more Congolese citizens and can prove it, it looks like it would be a very straightforward matter to (re?)acquire Congolese citizenship, although you’ll have to prove proficiency in one or more Congolese languages, among other things (this law is designed in part to keep Rwandans out; perhaps French will suffice if you don’t speak an indigenous language). But to echo above cautions, should you decide to take on a Congolese passport and formally renounce American citizenship, your global horizons are going to narrow a lot.

      You might never even get back into the States if you change your mind, perhaps not even to visit, since you will need to get visas.

      You referred to your birth family being in DRC—were you adopted out by an American family as a kid, or something? I’ve often wondered how frequently international adoptees return to their roots. I know a handful of such people (all Asians apart from one Romanian in my case), but they are all pretty monoculturally American as adults.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, my birth family is Congolese, and my adoptive family is American. Luckily, I was able to keep in contact with my birth family. That's interesting to see more adoptees return to their homeland. I thought it would be exceedingly rare (especially if they don't keep contact).

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          The Romanian guy was a child of open adoption—both he and his parents were in at least sporadic contact with his birth mom. She’s an absolute mess, long history of drug and psych problems and arrests and hospitalizations. But he decided he wanted to get to know her better (and to get an EU passport), so he went to Romania and lived with cousins for a while. He didn’t stay in Romania long, though. He got the passport and moved someplace else in Europe, can’t remember where. But he’s much more American than Romanian in character—his first language is English, and he didn’t actually like Romania much once he got there.

          And a brother and sister I know (both middle-aged now) were adopted out as refugees from Vietnam. They came to the States when they were older, like middle-school aged. Their mom had been a hooker and their biological dads were two different (unknown) American soldiers. Their situation was very different from my Romanian friend’s—although they had a warm and loving relationship with their foster, and then adoptive, parents, they always identified as Vietnamese. The sister went back when she was in her 20s, got married to a Vietnamese guy and had a family, and only comes back to the states for occasional visits. The brother married an American, moved to upstate New York somewhere, and has only been back to VN a couple of times to visit his sister.

          And the last one I know personally is a girl who was born in Korea and adopted out by white folks as a baby. She’s never met her birth mom, who according to records was a teenager from a rural family who got knocked up. But my friend got fascinated by Korean culture despite (or maybe because of?) growing up in the white-breadest of households, and went back as an adult. She’s lived in Seoul for years, but I think she’s always worked for American companies and hangs out mostly with expats, and she speaks Korean with a noticeable American accent.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah I watched some youtubers and read some blogs. They said congo was one of the harder countries to coom in due to the men being very racist to white people. Apparently some of the girls have to go to a white guys apartment very discreetly. Right now a coom scene that is appearing now for whites and blacks is India. If you manage to go tell us what it's like. Of course you can always go to the Philippines but we have all heard 1000 stories on that place.

  6. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    If I were you I'd look to move to Cambodia so you don't get decapitated for $5

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >If I were you I'd look to move to Cambodia
      Cambodia was actually among the countries selling citizenship by investment for a while; not sure if they are still in the business. But it was surprisingly expensive for the privilege of living in one of the most corrupt places on Earth; their target market must have been exclusively Chinese and Russian gangsters with prices on their heads back home.

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