Does traveling for work lead to a cycle of dissatisfaction?

Is there anyone else that travels for work that can relate to a constant cycle of draining overstimulation and under-stimulation? Here's how the cycle goes:

>Prepare for a trip
>Be excited to travel to the location, but unsatisfied with the amount of time and effort it takes to get there
>Over a period of X days, be constantly excited and stimulated with new, cool things
>The trip starts dragging on at the end, as you become exhausted with constantly doing things
>Excited to go home, but dread the idea of spending the time traveling back
>Finally get home and sleep
>Wake up the next morning with the feeling of nothing to do. You feel bored, and under-stimulated when compared to your week

This constant cycle makes it hard to stick to a routine diet and exercise plan. Also, it's hard to feel grounded or attached to a location when you're not even at "home" 75% of the time. I don't feel tied to anywhere. As an example, I used to be fascinated with being in desert or prairie landscapes, because I was used to green, swampy, and marshy in my hometown. Now I barely get a dopamine release from new experiences. I'm forced to find comfort in things that can be attached to any place like sex or alcohol.

Any other RealTravelers experience this fatiguing cycle?

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  1. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    >I'm forced to find comfort in things that can be attached to any place like sex or alcohol.
    How do you get laid on business trips?

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      coworkers

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        How the hell do you manage to sleep with coworkers? What industry is this?

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        this has always been my fantasy to sleep with my co workers.

        but I'm not stupid enough to shit where I eat. I'd rather keep my job and use the money I earned to sleep with hookers.

  2. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Obviously, the more you repeat an exciting experience, the less exciting it will become. Same will happen if you become a veteran coomer; alcohol and sex will become commonplace and unexciting. As long as you chase stimulation, boredom will be your constant enemy. When you learn to be happy relaxing and enjoying life wherever you are, you will never be bored again. You will also feel more attached to your travel destinations if you spend all your free time hanging around a certain area instead of gallivanting all over the country on tours and excursions.
    You may want to look at taking fewer trips, but for longer durations, if you want to enjoy your trip from arrival to departure. Of course, it all depends on business demands.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      I mostly have no control over trip length, although its generally 3-4 days per week for about 2 or 3 weeks per month. My last trip, however, had me flying all over the country back to back to back for two weeks straight in order to knock things out more quickly. In general, these add up to the same effect, though

  3. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Is there anyone else that travels for work
    yes. not as much as i used to, and it dropped to zero during covid, but it's picking up again now
    >that can relate to a constant cycle of draining overstimulation and under-stimulation?
    no, i've always pretty much enjoyed it. it does get tiring travelling through several different time zones in a short space of time but that goes with the territory and it has meant i have been to places that i would never have thought about going to otherwise
    >Here's how the cycle goes:
    no i don't recognise this at all
    i guess it either suits you or it doesn't

  4. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    It was exciting in the beginning. But years later every hotel looks the same. When I can tell what airport it is just by looking at a gate it becomes sad. Now I’m just trying to finish off lifetime status and move on.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      >"It was exciting in the beginning. But years later every hotel looks the same."

      Idk how to explain to my gf when we travel that Idgaf how cute the room is, I've paid less and had better, and I've also paid more and had worse. Hotels usually fail to amaze me now. There's no "this is really nice" or "this really sucks", it's "this is suitable" or "this isn't suitable"

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        It’s difficult to understand if you haven’t experienced it. I’ve stayed something like 1300 nights on the road now between work and vacation. Other than extremely rare hotels with extremely unique features, they all blur together.

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah this is kind of annoying and kind of nice. As a generap rule I actually find when I pay several times the price of the cheapest place, it is normally worse than what I would have got at the cheapest place. Its nice that spending very little money actually leads to relative comfort, but annoying that I can't choose to splurge out a bit if I just want to be more comfortable and high-end.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      >"It was exciting in the beginning. But years later every hotel looks the same."

      Idk how to explain to my gf when we travel that Idgaf how cute the room is, I've paid less and had better, and I've also paid more and had worse. Hotels usually fail to amaze me now. There's no "this is really nice" or "this really sucks", it's "this is suitable" or "this isn't suitable"

      There are hotels that are my favorites and I never get tired of returning to them.

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