How do young people travel constantly? Some of them aren't from a rich family so how?

How do young people travel constantly? Some of them aren't from a rich family so how?

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  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I lived at home through university. My parents didn't give me an allowance or pay my bills, but they didn't ask me to pay rent or contribute to household maintenance, either. So I got a part-time job, worked as much as I possibly could, and saved almost everything for travel. I ended up spending almost every summer and winter abroad, typically in lower-cost destinations like Eastern Europe, Latin America, and South Asia. It was a good time.

    Even when I did express interest in moving out--or buying a more expensive car--my mom said it'd be a waste of money, and then I may as well take the opportunity they've given me to see more of the world, since it likely wouldn't be so easy and convenient later on.

    After I graduated, I ended up with a few low-paying remote jobs that I leveraged into more robust and better-compensated contracts. So I did the whole digital nomad meme for a few years before moving back to the States.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Damn what sort of jobs are remote that can pay ok? I make 90k a year with 3 years experience so it's enough that I don't want to switch but I can't fly whenever I want either

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I can't give much advice.

        I work as a copy-writer and advertising consultant for a collection of different law firms. Copy-writing isn't an especially lucrative industry, and it isn't easy to break into without prior experience, a college degree, and a semi-specialized skillset. I got lucky, in that I wiggled my way into a poorly-compensated position with a major law blog when I was still in university.

        I don't make big buck. My income was always variable: overall, I probably averaged between $60,000 and $70,000 per year, maxing out around $120,000. But I set my own schedule, and I rarely worked more than 20 or 25 hours per week (part of the reason I managed to make decent-ish money is that I type 145wpm+, can write reasonably well without trying, and have a handful of clients who do pay very competitive rates).

        But it was more than enough to live indefinitely in most parts of the world. Aside from not really getting any vacation time, I'm happy I had the experience and don't regret much about it. Having said that, I'm actively on my way out of this industry and will be applying to (more) grad programs this September.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >copywriter
          >all those run-on sentences

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm an accountant making $80k working fully remotely, I can technically take as many days off as I want as long as I reach a pretty reasonable number of billable hours for the year (1400). Once I get my CPA it should be decent bump in salary and open more options if I want to actually move to a different c**t full time instead of bouncing around for a couple months at a time and not telling my employer

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds like you got a cool mom. I'd probably push my kids to do the same.

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    they are prostitutes/sugar babies

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      sovl

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is the honest truth. Every travel chick I know has told me that they are sugar babies

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I worked a lot but it wasn't always easy to get work or save up and gonna be honest I only survived sometimes by using men and I kinda hate the reality of it but then again when I was living on my own I quickly felt lonely so it gave my life meaning in a way to have these short lived connections. I wanted a long term partner with similar life goals but it was never going to happen and now I'm not sure I want it anymore.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >and now I'm not sure I want it anymore
        You mean now you're old and used up so nobody worth a damn wants you.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Your wishful thinking won't make you feel better little one

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Learn how to churn and burn points

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      everyone ignores the real answer, kek. i traveled a lot of the world on 20k a year

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Share some guides

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >find credit card with biggest sign on bonus
          >get bonus organically or by manufactured spending

          Repeat. My flight to Delhi and back is free due to this. My last flight to Mumbai was free. I flew friends for free to New York City, San Francisco, and New Orleans. Before that I went to Saigon for free and back from Manila for free. The biggest expense is the flights. Most people are moronic and get burned by credit cards which allows smart White men like me to take advantage and colonize the world for free.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            im going to delete this in a few hours because I want to do this the rest of my life, I advise you also keep it to yourself

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >repeat
            There are only a few sign up bonuses that give you a bonus large enough for those types of expenses. They also impose a minimum of a 2 year wait before you can get another bonus as a "new or returning" member, and that's if they don't impose a one sign up bonus per life time policy. Hardly repeatable in any short term manner. The cold hard facts is that you're either using a travel card as a daily use card for every day purchases, grinding out points, or you're manufacturing spending and getting much worse value for your "investment"

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              lol ok you think that

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                I think that because I've lived the churn game. You're not savvy enough to navigate the churn loopholes because they don't exist.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                that's why ive been doing it for over a decade

                Thanks anon for sharing. I suppose you can't share how you find these credit cards, but could you share what you mean exactly by manufactured spending?

                thepointsguy
                manufactured spending is spending money without actually spending to hit the bonus (visa gift cards, crypto, gold, etc)

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Over a decade...yeah, long enough to reset the new cardmember bonus time limit. Thanks for playing. Good luck to you.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >not repeatable
                >okay it is repeatable

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Hmm I didn't realize crypto counts...I assume you're doing this on a KYC exchange like Coinbase?

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                not sure if you can still buy crypto with credit, you used to be able to years ago. I don't need to MS anymore, I just get bonuses organically

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              AMEX repeatedly puts out card offers without lifetime language. Business cards can be repeatedly opened. It isn't very difficult at all.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Thanks anon for sharing. I suppose you can't share how you find these credit cards, but could you share what you mean exactly by manufactured spending?

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              He means buying stupid shit to trigger the minimum spend award. Example, spending $4k within 3 months to receive 100k in card points.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Just open a million credit cards
            Won't that tank your credit score?

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              no, 790 rn

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Damn, that's great. Gonna look more into this.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              All the really young people I've know that travel either have rich parents or take out a lot of debt to do it. That said, some of the poorer ones will do things like hostels and backpacking, but there's always some story about your stuff being stolen in the hostel or some kind of assault.

              Your credit score only tanks if you don't pay the debts. You could go through thousands in a week and it would be fine as long as you pay it off entirely before it becomes due. Credit cards are a fast way to build credit, it's just that some morons consider it infinite money and fall into debt, which then tanks their score.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >look up credit card companies
          >find out what their offer is for new card members
          >apply for card
          >spend the required amount for the bonus points
          >open new card with same company
          >spend the amount for the points
          >when you've opened the cards and the (typically 2 year) time limit comes, close and reopen
          >repeat forever
          >get infinity points doing this
          That simple, especially worth if you can get business cards and double worth if you hit the minimum by purchasing flights. The Chase Freedom cards for instance ask for $500 to get 20k points ($200), open both in a year, buy a flight on one, put your expenses abroad on the second and thats 40,000 points. If lucky you can get first class internationals for about 60-70k points, which, in my case, is 5 months of normal spending. If you can't downgrade your cards at the two year mark, you will take a credit hit, but if you don't need a new car or home then the hit is relatively painless. Since I actually plan on buying a home, churn game isn't for me, but my normal spending alone is enough for the ultra long haul 100k+ point first class tickets, once about every two years. Your standard opener is the Chase Freedom Unlimited, Freedom Flex, and Sapphire Preferred. Annual cost of $95, $5k spending to get 100,000 points ($1k). You transfer your points to an airline partner where you can get up to 6 cents per point ($6k value) and there you go. Never actually spend your points on the CC company's own service. The 60k is standard for the Chase Sapphire Preferred, but its 70-80k sometimes, just check often.

          Credit cards should only be opened if you can actually manage your credit. If you're carrying a balance of above $0 at the end of the month, they're not for you.

          im going to delete this in a few hours because I want to do this the rest of my life, I advise you also keep it to yourself

          CC companies will not care about churners, they have more than enough morons who can't handle credit to make up for it, hence why they make the offers in the first place. Talking about it is not going to cause the companies to shut it down.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            That's a lot of good goy points.
            All these rewards programs are designed for good career goys to enjoy a discounted or complimentary vacation, as a reward from the system for being such a useful & obedient goy. No credit card company would approve my vagabond ass for a card, that's for sure. Had a helluva time even getting a bank card from Charles Schwab, because they couldn't validate any address for me...for good reason, because I don't live anywhere. Plus, you have to spend and spend to make the points, and then the points are useless unless you spend some more, so obviously these schemes are only useful for big consoomers.

            the biggest lie perpetuated by the media, idiots, boomers and rich people is that traveling is expensive.
            Because of the idea these people have that to have a holiday you need to stay at a resort or luxury hotel.
            As a young person they are able to strike up relations with other young people overseas and get free places to stay.
            Its that simple.

            Most young people flock to destinations with plenty of hostels, because they are the most fun, and because the competition between hostels keeps the prices low. Not free, but cheap. It's amazing how much of a herd mentality they have; entire countries like Mexico might only have four or five destinations where 90% of young people go.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              when i was young i just met girls and stayed at their place. On reflection it was kinda a risky thing to do, i think one father attempted to kill me once

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                What do you mean you think?
                Was he dropping stuff in your food?

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              >That's a lot of good goy points.
              Its really just groceries, gas, nights out, rent and insurance payments placed on the card instead of on my debit card. Its simple, do I want to get 1.5-3% cash back or do I want to not get anything back from my spending?
              >All these rewards programs are designed for good career goys to enjoy a discounted or complimentary vacation, as a reward from the system for being such a useful & obedient goy.
              No, theyre incentives to get anyone to get credit cards because 99% of credit card owners will never use a credit card responsibly. The 1% who game the system arent making the CC company happy, but theres enough morons that they dont care.
              >No credit card company would approve my vagabond ass for a card, that's for sure.
              Thats on you for being a poorcel moron. Theres cards that literally function to build credit for people who have none and qualify for none, so you not even being aware of these just goes to show how financially illiterate you are.
              >Had a helluva time even getting a bank card from Charles Schwab, because they couldn't validate any address for me...for good reason, because I don't live anywhere.
              This is your brain on /misc/, not being a homeless bum is actually a good thing because then you're not being a good goy for da joos!
              >Plus, you have to spend and spend to make the points
              This may come as a shock to you, but people who arent homeless bums like you actually spend constantly to avoid homelessness and starvation and the bare minimum is enough to earn around 3-4k points a month.
              >and then the points are useless unless you spend some more
              If you have enough points for a flight and hotel stay, the points are literally enough. You dont know what you're talking about.
              >so obviously these schemes are only useful for big consoomers.
              Theyre useful to anyone who can carry a balance of $0 a month, slow but steady returns are useful. Even if its a free vacation once every 5 years, its still a free vacation.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                NTA but did you have any reason for going for a point card as opposed to a straight up 1.5%+ cash back card?

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Cash back is better if you're using it for exactly that, cash back. If you want to travel then points are infinitely better. A $500 mariott stay can cost you about $320 in points, so an all cash back card would not make up the difference, you'd still be spending out of pocket for the rest. Same thing with upgrades, your first class to asia will cost you several thousands of dollars (roundtrip to Japan from my location in first is $8k) but with points it will likely cost you 200k points (half the redemption cost). Most normal cards also don't let you transfer to airlines where you can redeem for higher values. You have to pick one and only one, cash in hand or points for free flights/hotels. Also, the cards have multipliers so your 1.5% standard will earn slower than 3% on dining, 5% on gas, etc.

                Crunched the numbers on the last four weeks in Malaysia. Excluding alcohol, I spent $650 USD visiting five cities. 23 out of 28 nights in a centrally located hotel room with private bathroom, usually with natural lighting. Delicious food on every hand, including amazing baked treats. Obviously, travel is so freaking unaffordable these days, it's mind-boggling how any young person can afford it.

                The biggest cost of travel, and the one which most people are unwilling to take, is the perceived "opportunity cost".
                >Imagine how much farther you would go in life if you stayed with your nose to the grindstone instead of wandering idly around the world for years at a time!
                [...]
                go ahead, enjoy your little vacation in a globohomosexual resort. then get back to working and spending and accumulating points. you are fat and domesticated, while i am lean and wild. we will never see eye to eye.

                >I spent little to live in Malaysia
                Whoa no way, next you're gonna tell me you can do the same thing in India!
                >my hotel had a private bathroom
                I cant imagine being so poor that you actually think a private bathroom is a flex lmfao. I have never NOT stayed somewhere without a private bathroom, so congrats on essentially admitting you shit in the streets whenever you're priced out of your dirt cheap $20/night hotel.
                >perceived opportunity cost
                but it's not a perceived cost, it's measurable in dollar quantities. If you're a high earner then your pretense is even more ridiculous. Home ownership is not a dream for me like it is for you, month long vacations are also not a dream either. I don't have to pick one or the other, and I don't have to live in poverty when spending for either of them.
                >enjoy your globohomosexual resort
                Poorgay cope. A proper ryokan in Japan gets expensive. Hell, a mid tier spot wastes your monthly Malaysia budget in like 4 days, and traditional japanese hot spring inn is not globohomo.
                >keep working and spending!
                Sir, the mcdonalds is closing, you need to get your wifi elsewhere now.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      What the frick does that even mean

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Americans give 3+% tips to credit card companies on every transaction card, cash or otherwise.
        If they exploit various points and signup schemes, they can get some of this back through flight or hotel vouchers.

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    even though there has been a bit of an uptick recently travel is cheaper now than it has ever been at almost any other point in time
    it doesn't necessarily cost a lot to travel for quite a long time

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm practically NEET living with my parents and work for a couple months a year and travel for a couple months a year.
    sometimes I feel really pathetic since I'm 30 now, but usually I'm fine

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      What job let's you go out for a few months?

      Travel isn't very expensive if you don't have responsibilities like kids/mortgage. Save up money from your shitty retail job for an awful flight that has two layovers but is cheap, stay in dirt cheap hostels, live off cheap food - in some countries, flights aside, its cheaper to visit than to live in the west.

      Well the key is that you have to fly. I just got a travel credit card though so hopefully I can solve that. What kills me Is I get 4 weeks vacation and no more so that's all I can do despite good money

      I can't give much advice.

      I work as a copy-writer and advertising consultant for a collection of different law firms. Copy-writing isn't an especially lucrative industry, and it isn't easy to break into without prior experience, a college degree, and a semi-specialized skillset. I got lucky, in that I wiggled my way into a poorly-compensated position with a major law blog when I was still in university.

      I don't make big buck. My income was always variable: overall, I probably averaged between $60,000 and $70,000 per year, maxing out around $120,000. But I set my own schedule, and I rarely worked more than 20 or 25 hours per week (part of the reason I managed to make decent-ish money is that I type 145wpm+, can write reasonably well without trying, and have a handful of clients who do pay very competitive rates).

      But it was more than enough to live indefinitely in most parts of the world. Aside from not really getting any vacation time, I'm happy I had the experience and don't regret much about it. Having said that, I'm actively on my way out of this industry and will be applying to (more) grad programs this September.

      Damn that sounds pretty good. And you never got b***hed at and got to work in silence? That sounds so great

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I just find a new shitty job when I need one. quit after 2 or 3 months once I've made a few grand

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          what sort of shitty jobs

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            just retail shit

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Damn that sounds pretty good. And you never got b***hed at and got to work in silence? That sounds so great
        I don't think I've had to speak to somebody at work on the phone or in-person more than two or three times since starting. One of my bigger clients does occasionally invite me to Zoom meetings, but I'm not required to attend as a contractor and get paid an hourly rate if and when I do.

        The remainder of my communications are entirely email- and message board-based. So I'll receive a set of assignments or topics from an editor, acknowledge them and provide a tentative turn-around time, and then send them back once they're finished. That's really about it.

        I still work for the law blog I started off with--it doesn't pay well, but the work is super easy, takes less than 3-4 hours per week, and provides $1,000 per month in additional income--and sometimes send longer emails to my editor, since we've known each other for ~7 years at this point and have a solid relationship. Most of it isn't work-related, just talking about the weather and whatever is going on in our respective lives, kek.

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Travel isn't very expensive if you don't have responsibilities like kids/mortgage. Save up money from your shitty retail job for an awful flight that has two layovers but is cheap, stay in dirt cheap hostels, live off cheap food - in some countries, flights aside, its cheaper to visit than to live in the west.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      With the job market in America the way it's been the last few years, how has any young white guy or gal with an ounce of motivation and discipline NOT saved up $3000 to go backpacking a couple months in 2024?

      All that povertymaxxing is not necessary, though many young people will skimp on everything to maximize their spend on the fun stuff: drinking and partying.
      Including flights from California to Manila to Bangkok to Kuala Lumpur to Bangkok to Taipei, the past three and a half months in Southeast Asia have cost me $4364. No hostels, no shared bathrooms, no layovers, and eating whatever I want to eat. People pay $1250/month in israeliteSA for a lame one-bedroom apartment in a sterile complex nowhere near downtown.

      You can travel the whole world doing hitchhiking and basically you can survive eating food for $1 a day. How much more you spend depends on how pussyfied you feel.

      By "survive", you mean people feel sorry for you going hungry and feed you some of the food that was meant for their own family. If you take charity just for kicks, you are scum.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        A lot of guys I jnow provately admit to me that they get intimidated by other people into giving tribute to roasties. So thats where their money goes. In my case, roasties just take me to court and sue me every year. I thought about just burying my cash but the israelitedge told me that they’d give me indefinite prison sentence until the money was found (and if it never is, I never leave incarceration).

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you don’t have a wife, kids, or have to pay rent, you can easily save up 20k in a year, or 6 months if you’re working two jobs

  8. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can travel the whole world doing hitchhiking and basically you can survive eating food for $1 a day. How much more you spend depends on how pussyfied you feel.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Food for a dollar a day? That doesn't sound realistic. You would really suffer or possibly die after a while

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Not him but you can literally get food for free in the US from co-ops and churchs. Hell even gas station dumpsters. Just gotta learn to swallow that pride a little bit

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >hell yeah free food out of dumpsters
          do mericans really

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            white environuts who are mad about reducing food waste love to dumpster dive. everyone else uses EBTbux.

  9. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    lifestyle choice.. simply be goal oriented towards travel, so everything they do surrounds that.

    I knew someone who worked a fairly low-end office job as a contractor (call centre I believe), didn't earn that much, didn't have a car, lived in a cheap share house, lived a fairly minimalist lifestyle.
    In saying that, that wasn't their whole life, They still had a very active social life, going to gigs every other weekend but avoided drinking (fricking expensive in my country), they avoided relationships despite them being conventionally VERY attractive, friendly and outgoing (they simply refused to be tethered back home or to someone who didn't share their lifestyle choice)

    On the average year, they'd do two fairly decent epic trips. As long as the minimal rent was paid back home, they could pack up and leave overnight for SEA/India/Africa.
    when they return they either pick up their old job or have another one lined up fairly quick

    it's possible, but i figure it's like going into military service, it's a lifestyle choice for a point in time, not an escape from their life back home.

  10. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Either burning through their university scholarship or prostitution.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      or things aren't as expensive as you believe, dumbass
      stop using money as an excuse because you're too scared to go outside

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        damn, did that hit a nerve or what lol

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          You were called a dumbass and you think that means that anon was upset? People can call you names without being angry, they're just describing you.
          You also seem like you only have excuses for why you don't do anything and use your previous comment to justify why you don't do anything.

  11. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    For me it was because I was in the military. I got super lucky and got posted in South Korea right out of training, got to travel a lot of SEA over 3 years. Then I reenlisted to go to Germany and then traveled a good chunk of Europe as well. By 28 I had been to like 30 or so countries. I could only go out of the country during extended weekends though, or through leave. During regular weekends I'd just explore the host country some more, if I didn't have duty of course.

    Now at 33 my traveling has slowed down because of a real career, house, family etc. Note: this isn't an advertisement to join the military. Understand I got extremely lucky to end up at the bases where I did. You'll probably get sent to Fort Polk or some shit.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I mean it's a solid option if you don't pick a braindead branch like the Army because the simple fact is being active duty waives annual fees. So at that point with points you're essentially just getting free travel.

  12. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    all these people are ignoring the obvious facts that yes, they are also using credit cards/financing.

  13. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Budgeting wisely. If you're 18-22 and living with parents, any cash from a part time job is pure savings if you don't spend it on crap at home. Even if you're earning $7/hr only working 20hrs/week, that's $6720 a year, or one good international trip annually as the ultimate poorgay student. I went to law school and know tons of people who are 26 and earning around $80-110k a year, a good portion of which like traveling and can now afford to do so alone or with a gf.

    I'm on the same boat, earning $95k/yr as a fresh out of law school grad. After paying for my new car, rent, insurance, taxes and groceries, I can save up around $2700 per month, so for me, after 5 months of saving, I can spend over 10 grand on flights, accommodations, high end meals, high end booze, taxis everywhere... I shove everything on credit cards too so I maximize my points earning and get first class flights relatively easy every other year (rent, insurance, car payments, groceries, dining out, I'm averaging around 60k points per year WITHOUT the sign up bonuses). Going to cheaper places helps. In college I spent 3 weeks in Ukraine for under $3k. My shitty lviv airbnb was a block away from Rynok Square and cost $16/day. Same thing when my law school bros and I went to Puerto Rico. $3k for 10 days of quality airbnb at a high end beach area, there was only like 3 other families with us in the whole place, security everywhere, lobsters, rum, champagne, cocaine, cigars at a high end lounge, rainforest tour, glow in the dark lagoon tour, golf, catamaran trip to smaller islands. Great time for practically nothing.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >$6720 a year

      nice going anon,I make around $1200 per every five months ;_;.........

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        how do you even afford internet access?

  14. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    the biggest lie perpetuated by the media, idiots, boomers and rich people is that traveling is expensive.
    Because of the idea these people have that to have a holiday you need to stay at a resort or luxury hotel.
    As a young person they are able to strike up relations with other young people overseas and get free places to stay.
    Its that simple.

  15. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    The men I know who do it are techbros.
    The women, well... We can only guess gluck gluck!

  16. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I know an old dude who said he used to backpack a lot. His secret was that he lived at home the whole time but he won't admit this.It was all due to him being extremely frugal according to him.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      I guess not paying rent counts as frugal.

  17. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    we have jobs and save lmfao
    travel isn't particularly expensive anymore
    i've managed to travel plenty while paying rent and having low income and no assistance from parents

  18. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >live with mom and dad
    >free rent if I help take out trash during the week
    >NEET bux invested in crypto
    >travel telling them I am going looking for job
    >get extra bucks

  19. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Most of them are rich, and larping as if they aren't

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah maybe but you dont have to be rich to do it.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Crunched the numbers on the last four weeks in Malaysia. Excluding alcohol, I spent $650 USD visiting five cities. 23 out of 28 nights in a centrally located hotel room with private bathroom, usually with natural lighting. Delicious food on every hand, including amazing baked treats. Obviously, travel is so freaking unaffordable these days, it's mind-boggling how any young person can afford it.

      The biggest cost of travel, and the one which most people are unwilling to take, is the perceived "opportunity cost".
      >Imagine how much farther you would go in life if you stayed with your nose to the grindstone instead of wandering idly around the world for years at a time!

      >That's a lot of good goy points.
      Its really just groceries, gas, nights out, rent and insurance payments placed on the card instead of on my debit card. Its simple, do I want to get 1.5-3% cash back or do I want to not get anything back from my spending?
      >All these rewards programs are designed for good career goys to enjoy a discounted or complimentary vacation, as a reward from the system for being such a useful & obedient goy.
      No, theyre incentives to get anyone to get credit cards because 99% of credit card owners will never use a credit card responsibly. The 1% who game the system arent making the CC company happy, but theres enough morons that they dont care.
      >No credit card company would approve my vagabond ass for a card, that's for sure.
      Thats on you for being a poorcel moron. Theres cards that literally function to build credit for people who have none and qualify for none, so you not even being aware of these just goes to show how financially illiterate you are.
      >Had a helluva time even getting a bank card from Charles Schwab, because they couldn't validate any address for me...for good reason, because I don't live anywhere.
      This is your brain on /misc/, not being a homeless bum is actually a good thing because then you're not being a good goy for da joos!
      >Plus, you have to spend and spend to make the points
      This may come as a shock to you, but people who arent homeless bums like you actually spend constantly to avoid homelessness and starvation and the bare minimum is enough to earn around 3-4k points a month.
      >and then the points are useless unless you spend some more
      If you have enough points for a flight and hotel stay, the points are literally enough. You dont know what you're talking about.
      >so obviously these schemes are only useful for big consoomers.
      Theyre useful to anyone who can carry a balance of $0 a month, slow but steady returns are useful. Even if its a free vacation once every 5 years, its still a free vacation.

      go ahead, enjoy your little vacation in a globohomosexual resort. then get back to working and spending and accumulating points. you are fat and domesticated, while i am lean and wild. we will never see eye to eye.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I am lean and wild
        You mean incredibly poor and alone which is why you're vacating in Malaysia and bragging about a private bathroom lmao

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          In many ways, Malaysia is better developed than Thailand. But Malaysia, being English-speaking, is also more corporatized and less "exotic" than Thailand. Restaurants are big and staffed by wagies...and there is no point in going food hunting because Malay restaurants all serve the same dishes. Whereas I always find neat little Thai eateries where the owners prepare delicious food and appreciate my business. Budget hotels in Malaysia are merely a unit in a generic city block fronting a road, whereas Thai lodgings always have unique creative aspects to their construction, and are often located on dead-end courts and maze-like streets.

          Beacause travellers are degenerate and so they wouldn't mind traveling in slave tier conditions.

          Partly true. The actual "travel" part of travel is quite irrelevant when you take public transport. It's merely waiting in a confined space while you are carried to a new location. Being without your own wheels is slave tier, that much is true. I might pay 130 baht for a haircut, but I won't fall for the taxi touts, no sir. The frugal traveler learns to be content with being stuck in a place.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >the frugal traveler is content being stuck and unable to travel
            The absolute copium poorgays consume is unbelievable. Its as if all your money is spent on pharma grade copium, leaving you with nothing but pennies for your "stuckins"

  20. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    have you heard of
    digital nomad
    and somethjing called a savings account

  21. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    just do it. best time to travel is between jobs. get a new job lined up with a start date 2-3 weeks out from the end date at your current job and boom take a 2-3 week vacation.

  22. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It will shock you how many women are willing to do escort work.

  23. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's impossible for me to ever buy a home, I never will afford it, Sydney is the most expensive place to buy a home globally. So why save for something I won't ever have when I can just use it to travel and go to concerts and all that

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      a u australian? csn not u just buy a land and sea container and live in it?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Buying land is expensive as frick here. You've got stamp duty on top to pay and there is no way councils (local government) would allow that.

  24. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Beacause travellers are degenerate and so they wouldn't mind traveling in slave tier conditions.

  25. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    For me, it's bitcoin. But I'm mid-30s and not young. Most young people I met traveling were doing it in between school semesters or in between mcjobs. Nobody I met ever admitted to being from a rich family, but I was staying at cheap hostels anyway.

  26. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    i travelled about 10 - 15 thousands kilometer in asia and east europe. i did it with hitch-hiking. it is cheap. sometimes need to pay for driver, but not often. must know places for buy cheap food and sleep. need tent. need a lot of friends in another cities. need good communication skill. need cash. need positive attitude, representative, will. it is not easy, but it is possible.
    now i am too old for this shit.

  27. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's easy when you're young and don't have any real financial obligations. Back in 2014 I spent 5 months in Europe. For a year leading up to that I rented a room in a friend's apartment that cost me $300 a month. I worked a few different minimum wage jobs and saved pretty much everything beyond what I spent on food and rent. When traveling I remember getting by on $40 a day, sometimes less. That's $1,2000 a month. Real life cost more than if you have an apartment, insurance payments, car payments and so on.

    Traveling is as cheap as you are willing to make it.

  28. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you aren’t actively having someone sue/steal money from you, it’s easy to travel. While you’re young, that is.

  29. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Live at home and work for a month? Where do you not understand this?

  30. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    is people not being able to afford travel the worst boomer psyops?
    Literally makes no sense to anyone that has actually travelled on the cheap. It's classic boomer logic.

  31. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Because older people tend to have kids, mortgage, etc.

  32. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >24
    >live at home without the need to pay rent
    >never went to college so no student debt
    >few friends and no girlfriend so no reccuring social expenses
    >job instantly grants any of my leave of absence requests without question

    life is decent. i've been in SEA for the past few weeks and have a ton of other plans for this year.

  33. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I can't afford a house despite making more than median household income. rent is cheaper than buying. so I have leftover income.

    I gave up saving money and live paycheck to paycheck and am happier. luckily I saved 100k during covid so I have a nice safety net. But I make 80k a year remote job now and just spend everything I make because frick it.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      But why do you travel though?

  34. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Single with no kids
    >live at home with no rent
    >Casual job with high pay and flexible leave
    >high risk investments that hit— in the early days it was sports betting, now it’s mostly crypto.

    That’s how it was for me in my 20s

  35. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >saving money over time for a vacation
    >loans/credit cards
    >parents money
    >connections to get cheap flight tickets
    >backpacking is cheap
    >remote work

  36. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not American, so I get 4-6 weeks paid holidays depending on my job at the time. I also don't go out at home and work low skill, decent enough paying work(warehousing/forklift with arvo/night rates) for an ok savings rate. Can usually bank about 15-20k a year doing this.

  37. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you really have time to travel without needing a certain date flights are even cheaper, I always see alternate date flights being half the price of a normal flight I want

    Then of course people can stay somewhere cheap

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