I'm doing my first JLPT this December

I'm going straight for N1, no point bothering with the lower levels.

Once I'm certified I'll go on Gaijinpot and look for the best paying job in Japan I can get and move there.

Wish me luck. I wish you all luck and a happy life!

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  1. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Did you take the practice test?

  2. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    thanks for the livejournal update gay. what does this have to do with traveling?

  3. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Good luck.
    The biggest issue will be the fact that you dont have a degree or 10 years of relevant work experience in order to get a visa.

    But I understand your desire to move here. Its great to live without blacks, Muslims, Americans and other undesirable groups around.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Shut up moron

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        Doesnt happen where I live.

        • 9 months ago
          Anonymous

          Go back to where you came from

          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous

            No, Ameridark.
            You go outside, so some even darker black can stab you.

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous

              >Ameridark

  4. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    What's the best way to learn Japanese? I don't plan to be N1, but be able to hold a basic conversation.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Learn hiragana and katakana first. This is for learning the sounds that make the language. Shouldnt take more than 3 weeks. Follow up with learning how the verbs tbh and suru work while studying basic phrases and nouns specific to what you like or want to be able to talk about. Spend 2 weeks doing that. Follow that with 2 weeks of studying ko so do form for this and that, here and there. Follow that with learning how aru and iru work while learning the particles wo, ni, wa, ga, and no and how they function also add more nouns. Get to 100 nouns, make sure you have gotten all the pronouns down. Spend 2 weeks doing that.

      Take 2 more weeks to take what you understand about the verbs and their conjugation to study 25 new verbs and 25 adjectives. Take a month, study it all. Make sure you havent forgotten your particles.

      Stop and reflect on your weak points. To do this use the verbs tbh, suru, aru, iru and your 100 nouns and particles. Build sentences. Most likely the particles or the verb conjugation is getting you of you havent spent enough time reviewing your previous lessons. If not its the adjective conjugation. Do that for aslong as it takes until you can make simple sentences in present and past tense positive and negative tense.

      Spend a month doing phrases again. Maybe like a phrase a day. The structure will make more sense now and the phrases will be useful.

      At that point you can either rinse and repeat by adding more nouns, verbs, and adjectives as you see fit. This will increase your ability to say and communicate alot of things but sound like a 5 year old. Or you can start to learn how to connect sentences with concepts like because of, in regards to, more than etc. This will help you express things more clearly but youll be able to say less.

      This whole time absorb japanese content in japanese. No subs. Idc if you understand a word of it, eventually youll start picking things up. Good.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        not him but I get filtered by the moon runes. I learned hiragana but the idea of having to learn thousands of kanji is impossible to me.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          >learn thousands of kanji
          you don't. just listen and speak. you are overcomplicating. you need 800 characters to be competent in life. you can speak way more if you are able to learn to read 800.

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'll give it a shot again in the future once I have full motivation to do it (although I should really start today). I just remember doing an anki deck and even just the numbers was a mind frick to me.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        what a total waste of time.
        >learn sounds
        >listen for several hours a day if you can, at least 1 hour
        >repeat stuff
        >learn verbs
        >pronouns you should pick up via listening
        >adjectives come from listening
        >nouns come from listening
        >listen and repeat what you hear
        >listen more.

        you say
        >Stop and reflect on your weak points. To do this use the verbs tbh, suru, aru, iru and your 100 nouns and particles. Build sentences. Most likely the particles or the verb conjugation is getting you of you havent spent enough time reviewing your previous lessons. If not its the adjective conjugation. Do that for aslong as it takes until you can make simple sentences in present and past tense positive and negative tense.
        that is all invalidated by just listening to peppa pig over and over again and repeating what you hear.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          [...]
          Both of you ignoring the last sentence about listening to content in japanese the whole time. Real smooth brain activity.

          Me again, listened to peppa pig. Youre right anon that shit is badass. Do the peppa.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      do not do what the other anon suggested. you need to listen to japanese in context. you should learn the sounds of japanese, i.e. the initials and finals, the vowels and consonants.
      https://enunciate.arts.ubc.ca/japanese/introduction/46-sounds-of-japanese/
      then you should listen to japanese speaking everyday, ideally with context of what the words are.
      i recommend japanese news in japanese and peppa pig or other jap kids cartoons for young kids

      reading and writing should be done AFTER you can hold a conversation. you retain words much better by listening and trying to remember the words by writing them 1000 times and building a vocab of words you can recall by looking at them is not how you go about it, but IT IS how the learning process is made into a profitable business.
      this is the same for all languages but especially FSI Level 5 languages which don't use the A-Z alphabet or a variant.
      also never use romanisation when learning japanese.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        what a total waste of time.
        >learn sounds
        >listen for several hours a day if you can, at least 1 hour
        >repeat stuff
        >learn verbs
        >pronouns you should pick up via listening
        >adjectives come from listening
        >nouns come from listening
        >listen and repeat what you hear
        >listen more.

        you say
        >Stop and reflect on your weak points. To do this use the verbs tbh, suru, aru, iru and your 100 nouns and particles. Build sentences. Most likely the particles or the verb conjugation is getting you of you havent spent enough time reviewing your previous lessons. If not its the adjective conjugation. Do that for aslong as it takes until you can make simple sentences in present and past tense positive and negative tense.
        that is all invalidated by just listening to peppa pig over and over again and repeating what you hear.

        Both of you ignoring the last sentence about listening to content in japanese the whole time. Real smooth brain activity.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Unironically go find a college class. No matter how many hundreds of hours you spend reading and how many thousands of kanji you learn, you won't be able to form a single sentence if you don't practice speaking, and a class will force you to do that.

  5. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Good luck, OP! If you end up doing well on the N1, there is the Kanji Kentei as well if you want to brag about your kanji knowledge.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanji_Kentei

  6. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Do you already have a college degree? If so, there is also the option of grad school in Japan since college is a great place to network. A lot of STEM majors on SighSee apparently end up attending University of Tsukuba for grad school or another university located in the city of Tsukuba

  7. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    You're underestimating the difficulty of N1 and understimating the difficulty of finding a job. By my estimations, you're a moron.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      n1 isn't even fluent. lol. lmao even

      https://i.imgur.com/7NGd8X7.jpg

      I'm going straight for N1, no point bothering with the lower levels.

      Once I'm certified I'll go on Gaijinpot and look for the best paying job in Japan I can get and move there.

      Wish me luck. I wish you all luck and a happy life!

      why the frick would you go now? of all the times to go, now is the worst time to work there since the war

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      N1 is rather easy
      I passed on my first try, and didn't even do targeted prepping

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Can you suggest any textbooks?

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          Didn't use any real textbook other than picrel
          Tae Kim grammar guide into DoJG, then all the rest I learned from reading, listening and doing Anki with all vocab I come across. Also by interacting with locals whenever in Japan.

  8. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Try this first https://japanesetest4you.com/category/jlpt-n1/

    Also even if you are fluent small chance of getting a real job, especially if you are not already a resident

  9. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    I did so well on the JLPT exam I got N0 and an honors certificate from the Ministry of Language.

  10. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Goodluck OP. Dont forget to download Takoboto and use it for help! Godspeed

  11. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Congratulations, that's so amazing! Good luck!

  12. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >going to a country with 99% conviction rate
    >Going to a country where the police can arrest you 23 days without charges

  13. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you go to japan I recomend you only going with carry on.

    If they plant you drugs in your suitcase (some corrupt staff of the airpirt) you could end up 10 years in a japanese prison.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >If they plant you drugs in your suitcase (some corrupt staff of the airpirt) you could end up 10 years in a japanese prison.
      QRD?

  14. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >tfw studied my ass off for a difficult but very useful STEM degree
    >took Japanese as a minor, graduated quite conversational but not quite business level yet
    >Interview for several jobs while on extended stay in Japan, get several face to face interviews at some high profile companies
    >get rejected every time because there was always a Japanese candidate that obviously speaks native Japanese alongside broken English, and every role apparently prioritizes Japanese since the clients are all Japanese and all the important stakeholders/seniors are Japanese
    I feel moronic for even thinking I could get a job there. That was several years ago and my Japanese has atrophied significantly since the pandemic.
    I guess it's never too late to go back to learning but fricking hell you'd think the lost decade never ended

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Stop watching cartoons

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Have you ever thought of graduate school in Japan? Apparently, SighSee has a history of posters that attended University of Tsukuba and had a great time. Alternatively, you can skip attending University of Tsukuba as a grad student and go work at a Japanese national laboratory at places like Riken

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Tsukuba

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riken

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        my work in in finance so Riken won't help, but I'll Tsukuba looks nice. Seems pretty affordable, but will you able able to score work in Japan with a degree from there?
        I've been considering Sophia University tbh

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          When I think of business school in Japan, Waseda University is the first school that pops up in my mind since so many of Japan's political elites graduated from Waseda. As for Sophia University, I heard that it has one of the best language programs in Japan for foreign students.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waseda_University

          Waseda and Kansai Remain the Top University Choices for Japanese Students: https://www.nippon.com/en/japan-data/h01749/

          • 8 months ago
            Anonymous

            Considering how rare your finance STEM degree is, you should aim for a higher ranking Japanese university and I don't think you need to worry about your lack of Japanese skills since more and more Japanese universities are offering both undergraduate and graduate degrees taught exclusively in English for foreign students.

            If I were you, I would apply to Waseda which is a far more prestigious school compared to Sophia. Your job experience in finance would likely be more valuable at a business oriented school like Waseda as well.

            >Japan’s Most Extensive English-based Curriculum: Waseda University offers Japan’s most extensive English-based curriculum, comprising 50 programs and over 2,400 courses in undergraduate and graduate-school programs, with plans to further expand this number. Moreover, nearly half the faculty at Waseda has acquired a degree overseas.

            >No. 1 for Global Initiative: Waseda admits the highest number of international students (7,122 from 110 countries and territories) among Japanese universities and has the most students participating in study abroad.

            >Waseda has been ranked as the No. 1 business school in Japan (Eduniversal Best Masters Ranking 2022).

            https://www.waseda.jp/fcom/wbs/en/applicants/why

            thanks, I'll check out their program. At first glance it seems like Waseda is actually cheaper than Sophia. I'm guessing most of these places don't typically offer scholarships? I'm guessing they offer loans at least right?

            • 8 months ago
              Anonymous

              From what I heard, it is actually easier for foreign graduate students to successfully obtain scholarships to study at Japanese universities compared to foreign undergraduate students. This is because the competition for scholarships is much harsher at the undergraduate level.

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                Interesting, I'm guessing they just don't advertise that then? Hopefully I can handle working while studying

              • 8 months ago
                Anonymous

                To be honest, you should definitely find a college counselor that specializes in Japanese universities because 99% of the people who browse SighSee are unlikely to be active students attending Japanese universities and therefore, they lack the most up-to-date information about the Japanese college system. I do not know where you live but you should consider making a trip to the Japanese embassy in your country and see if any of the embassy staff could help direct you to people who can help you. After all, if you plan to move to Japan, you are eventually going to have to visit the Japanese embassy anyways so better familiarize yourself with the place.

            • 8 months ago
              Anonymous

              https://socrates.ynu.ac.jp/

              Fraction of the cost Waseda and Sophia are, assuming you have enough fluency to get at least N2 in a year living there

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          Considering how rare your finance STEM degree is, you should aim for a higher ranking Japanese university and I don't think you need to worry about your lack of Japanese skills since more and more Japanese universities are offering both undergraduate and graduate degrees taught exclusively in English for foreign students.

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          If I were you, I would apply to Waseda which is a far more prestigious school compared to Sophia. Your job experience in finance would likely be more valuable at a business oriented school like Waseda as well.

          >Japan’s Most Extensive English-based Curriculum: Waseda University offers Japan’s most extensive English-based curriculum, comprising 50 programs and over 2,400 courses in undergraduate and graduate-school programs, with plans to further expand this number. Moreover, nearly half the faculty at Waseda has acquired a degree overseas.

          >No. 1 for Global Initiative: Waseda admits the highest number of international students (7,122 from 110 countries and territories) among Japanese universities and has the most students participating in study abroad.

          >Waseda has been ranked as the No. 1 business school in Japan (Eduniversal Best Masters Ranking 2022).

          https://www.waseda.jp/fcom/wbs/en/applicants/why

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Consider sending a job resume to Japan's largest alcohol companies such as Asahi, Kirin, Sapporo and Suntory. These 4 companies are not just considered titans in Japan but are slowly buying up the rest of the world's alcohol brands, which means they require employees who are fluent in English to oversee their international operations.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      my work in in finance so Riken won't help, but I'll Tsukuba looks nice. Seems pretty affordable, but will you able able to score work in Japan with a degree from there?
      I've been considering Sophia University tbh

      I am curious why Tokyo University is absent from your choices. Is it because Tokyo University lacks your program?

      >Today I'll tell you about how I got into Japan's top university, the University of Tokyo, by going through the application documents you will need! You don't need to plan years in advance to get into this one specifically, but you do need to have done the necessary legwork to get into a good university in general. I am a Master's student at an English humanities program, so I don't know anything about the undergraduate or native Japanese process. I can assure you though that getting into grad school here is leagues easier than it is for Japanese kids taking the undergraduate exam, please don't compare me to that

      I got into Japan's Top University, Tokyo University (Application Process for Grad School in Japan) by Allison in Tokyo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byV541PFoio

      I graduated from Japan's Top University, Tokyo University by Allison in Tokyo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOcWmKIUcjE

  15. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have a plan to immigrate, would appreciate if any anons who actually tried some of the things I tried to do and/or immigrated had any advice. >Get aerospace engineering major at a university that has ties with TokyoU with possibility for exchange.
    >Spend a semester or two in TokyoU as exchange student and get to know personnel.
    >Along the major get a Japanese minor oriented towards business and technical words.
    >do internships every summer to get as much prior experience as possible.
    >upon graduation look for a job, probably for a company that have a Japanese branch (actually getting the job is the hard part but I was hoping the internships and Japanese minor would help)
    >Apply for graduate program at TokyoU while I work.
    >Once I graduated from the masters at TokyoU and been working for some years request permanent residency as per the point system Japan has set up.
    I’m still learning about all the ins and outs of immigrating so any help is welcome, and I am aware that the probability of everything going well is slim, but I’d like to try.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      In my experience, internships there are very short (like 1-4 weeks) and are just for you to get your name around the company and their Name on your resume for filtering when you apply for the job full time during Shukatsu. If you are dead set on a company then go for it, otherwise the time is better spend studying for a certification or their standardized test for jobhunting (SPI). Traditional companies are similar to military in that they just want proof you’re smart, they’ll retrain and allocate you to their needs.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Thanks for the help. Do you know if Japanese resumes follow a specific format?

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          They are actually very formulaic and they will throw yours away if it does not follow it. There is also interview etiquette you must follow to at least some degree. You should do some digging on all it

  16. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Japanese learners are the most insufferable dweebs I’ve met. No way to learn is right except theirs. It’s weak. Leave learning to the actual professionals, get an N5 level textbook like Genki, Work your way up through something N3 like Tobira, and move from there after you’ve gotten enough foundation to know what’s what. Lots of legit resources out there if you don’t want to go braindead with cartoons and NHK.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      Problem is that most professionals insist on teaching kanji in a very inefficient way because they're easy to teach and a student studying them on their own for free doesn't bring in any yennies.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Subjective determination on what is efficient. For my dad it was the story association, like the Kanji Look and Learn series. For me It’s seeing all the associated words, like in the Kanji in Context series. For some it’s learning the components and breaking it down. Some doing daily flash card decks. It’s a bunch of different approaches because no one way is best lol

        • 8 months ago
          Anonymous

          Those are all methods that didn't appear in a traditional Japanese classroom setting because for long Japanese teachers insisted on teaching kanji to adult foreigners the same way as they teach Japanese children for 6+3 years, namely by half-assed frequency and then hoping for exposure to stick.

  17. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    >N1スレッド
    >日本語ゼロ
    さすが、、、

  18. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Good luck!
    Choo Choo Japan!

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