India

I'm thinking about going to India. I've heard lots of conflicting thoughts about it. What do you guys think?

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's more or less the same shit as any third world country.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm there right now. I would say its worth one visit if you're curious. A tour guide is essential especially if you're white. I have been here a few times for various reasons aside from travelling/tourism, there is no way i'd come just for fun.

      I don't think it is. India is a hypercapitalist society where everyone's trying to scam each other or flog their garbage, at least in major cities. Its simply on another level to anywhere else. I find it utterly detestable but its worth seeing out of sheer curiosity for how pathetically money grubbing people can get.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >A tour guide is essential especially if you're white.

        I'm from:

        I've been to India several dozen times and currently live here.

        To be completely honest, India is a flaming dumpster-fire of a country. However, it's a fantastic place to visit if you have some patience and aren't expecting anything other than a typical third-world country with typical third-world country inconveniences. All things considered, people tend to be friendly and welcoming.

        Everything that people say about touts and scams is true, but it's also completely overblown. I've traveled extensively across most parts of India, and I've found that these sorts of hassles are borderline nonexistent outside a scarce handful of areas. For example, you'll be almost constantly bothered by travel agency touts in places like Delhi's Paharganj neighborhood, the Pink City in Jaipur, and anywhere within shooting distance of the Taj Mahal. However, other parts of the same cities--especially those that see few foreign tourists--are comparably tame, and you can explore without having to worry about strangers' poor intentions.

        People in more rural areas will either be quasi-autistically excited to see you or ignore you altogether (although they're usually very friendly if you speak some of their language and say hello).

        IMO, a lot of India's so-called travails can be avoided by simply doing your best to blend in and look confident. I've spent so much fucking time here that I can speak Hindi and two other Indian languages reasonably well. I'm as White as they come, but a lot of people--somehow--assume that I'm either Indian or Anglo-Indian (i.e., my family stayed here after the British Raj came to an end). Literally nobody bothers me when I travel by myself. This isn't because I'm special, it's just because I look comfortable in my surroundings. Tourist touts and con artists can smell "fresh meat" from miles away. If you look like you know where you're going and what you're doing, people stay clear out of your way, both for better and for worse.

        . A tour guide absolutely isn't necessary for anyone who isn't planning to do any of the following:
        >high-altitude trekking (i.e., climbing up an actual mountain)
        >deep jungle trekkingg
        >visiting rural areas with limited local transport
        >going to a park or other place where visitors are required to hire guides

        India can be a pain in the ass, but you unequivocally do not need a guide to visit most parts of the country. I guess it'd be useful if you're older or just want to have someone plan everything for you.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          A good guide will tell you where to go and who to bribe to cut down on days of waiting in lines, waiting for bus transfers and so on. Sure its not essential but the experience will be more painful and you will get scammed constantly if you are solo. I am an enjoyer of getting lost and figuring things out by yourself abroad, I just wouldn't recommend it in the hive of scum and villainy that is India.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          I'd say if you are 80 get a tour guide. India is easy as piss to travel around and everyone is friendly.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Same poster, would agree. I’ve been living here for the past couple years and have been coming twice or thrice per year for the past decade. I really don’t think India is a particularly challenging country to navigate, given the abundance of different transportation options—it can just be a little frustrating and confusing for first-time visitors, who might not understand how common delays and other inconveniences are. However, you can always just ask a stranger for help, and most people will do what they can to assist a retarded tourist. The only place you really have to be “on guard” for folks who’ll try taking advantage of you is in very touristic areas. Otherwise, I’ve found that most people here are actually quite honest; many Indians still subscribe to the whole “guest is god” ideology, and they don’t want to take a foreign tourist’s money.

            If anything, this is one of the few places where you can easily meet people you just met to call in sick to work so they hang out the next day or take you to some spot outside the city.

            Now, my parents and some other extended family are coming here in another few months, and I absolutely don’t wake them running around by themselves. But, TBQH, that’s just me being over-protective, since none of them have been anywhere except Europe before.

            But if you’re under the age of ~50-60, there’s really no need for a dedicated guide unless you want one (and frankly, a lot of guides are pretty useless, especially when you’re just looking for general help and not specific info about an archaeological site or region. A lot of Indians assume Westerners cannot handle any sort of discomfort whatsoever, and you end up getting sheltered and babied).

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      i doubt that
      even with thirdies theres a heirarchy and i would def put balkans at the top, then some central asian countries, some south american countries, (i prefer danger to filth), maybe some sea countries, then india and africa
      india is one of the last places id ever visit, revolting place

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Same but I'm going frontier northeast. Assam, Nagaland, Bengal. Any poo people here that can advise on what to see or do between Siliguri and Imphal? Scams? I will be camping ideally. I want to find myself sighseeside in india.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I've never heard of those places until now. They look cool though
      Have you been to India before?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        no, I have no idea what I'm getting into

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It is as shitty as it sounds. However, you should visit it anyway. A lot of people who hear about the bad stuff either don't believe it, or they at least believe it's exaggerated. You're never actually gonna know for sure unless you go over there and confirm it for yourself.

    I thought other people were exaggerating their experiences. Then I went and I realized they weren't kidding. I've since shared my experiences, and lots of people laughed it off, thinking I was just telling a joke. I'm done convincing people. You just gotta see it for yourself.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >It is as shitty as it sounds.
      tell me about your experiences

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      we want greentexts

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >I'm too afraid I might catch some kind of deadly antibiotic resistant infection.

    That happened to pro-wrestler William Regal. He did a tour of India with WWE back in 2002 and caught an infection that permanently messed up his heart & liver, and nearly lead to one of his legs being amputated. Antibiotics couldn't do anything for him.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Its cheap, food is great (albeit health concerns are serious), great sights, great sighsee and friendly people. Downside is the smell, the pollution and mass poverty. Oh and the touts are everywhere and very annoying. Its a good time, and Id recommend it very much despite the bad reputation.
      [...]
      It doesnt exist. Its really hard to find girls down for a ONS. Coomers are better off elsewhere. Not a pajeet either, the girls are just far more reluctant than in other spots where you can take them to a bar or club and then right back to your hotel. In some provinces alcohol is outright banned (unless you get a loicense) and many hotels wont let women go in the elevator with you because they know you're trying to fuck and chuck them. If you want to coom in India, focus on hostel broads visiting India. Talk about how spiritually enlightened you are from doing X and how you took a REAL NOT FAKE HYPER AUTHENTIC YOGA CLASS and she's going to put out in hours.

      Why did the comments get deleted?
      Are we turning to reddit?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        I think Jannies look at sighsee once every month and delete most coomer threads and comments

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          they only do that in indian threads for some reason

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            nah, i've been noticing it across the board. the main whiner in here is anyway the same guy who's been plastering shit "pajeeta" threads for a month nonstop

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              check LATAM, PH or SEA threads
              tons of cooming discussion

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Rule #1 of sighsee: You do not insult India.
        Rule #2 of sighsee: YOU DO NOT INSULT INDIA YOU BLOODY BANCHOD!

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >insult India
          His comments were just “how to creampie pajeetas as a 200cm white guy with BWC”

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes and that would be seen as an insult to an Indian man.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              More like irrelevant shit that has nothing to do with this thread

              If I were a mod, all of you incels would be wiped right off the board or given a single thread for your degeneracy

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            More like irrelevant shit that has nothing to do with this thread

            If I were a mod, all of you incels would be wiped right off the board or given a single thread for your degeneracy

            LOL calm down poojeet

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I think it's more likely the mods deleted ALL of his posts across the board, and he posted some retarded shit

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Its cheap, food is great (albeit health concerns are serious), great sights, great sighsee and friendly people. Downside is the smell, the pollution and mass poverty. Oh and the touts are everywhere and very annoying. Its a good time, and Id recommend it very much despite the bad reputation.

    [...]

    It doesnt exist. Its really hard to find girls down for a ONS. Coomers are better off elsewhere. Not a pajeet either, the girls are just far more reluctant than in other spots where you can take them to a bar or club and then right back to your hotel. In some provinces alcohol is outright banned (unless you get a loicense) and many hotels wont let women go in the elevator with you because they know you're trying to fuck and chuck them. If you want to coom in India, focus on hostel broads visiting India. Talk about how spiritually enlightened you are from doing X and how you took a REAL NOT FAKE HYPER AUTHENTIC YOGA CLASS and she's going to put out in hours.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Kek at the yoga comment, I need to try that when I get back from the states. Yoga crystal chicks are based but crazy

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've been several times, usually for a few months at a time. I honestly love the country and every trip I take there is unique and memorable. But it definitely wears you out overtime and after each trip I find myself kissing the ground when I get home. My advice is to stay away from the cities because they're all filthy, overcrowded shitholes that will drive you insane. You could do the golden triangle or something but I highly recommend heading south. Kerala is one of the most gorgeous places on earth imo. The natural beauty there is unrivaled even though Indians ruin it by throwing trash everywhere. It's dirt cheap, god-tier food and the people are incredibly friendly and hospitable. I had an airbnb host that just stopped charging me for meals after I told her I was a teacher lmao. The women are unbelievably beautiful as well but you probably won't be sleeping with any Malayalis. You can coom with slutty domestic tourists if you get lucky but girls don't really travel alone in India. Actually not sure why I'm replying to stupid coomers, fuck off you annoying retards.

    Himachal and the seven sisters are great as well. Just avoid tourist traps and population centers and do your own thing.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Going to India and avoiding the cities is missing out, if you don't go to these legendary cities in my opinion you haven't really experienced India. I appreciate what you said about the other places, but saying to skip a city like Bombay is bad advice.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      My gf is Malayalee and can confirm, she and her Malayalee friends are very pretty and her family is incredibly nice. Probably gonna go with her next year to visit her relatives.

      Anywhere you recommend visiting in Kerala?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Me and my girlfriend just AirBNB'd our way north, starting from Trivandrum. Varkala is absolutely worth a stop for a few days. It's just a spectacular natural environment that I've never seen anywhere else. The cliff is fun with a lot of restaurants and shops. You can go kayaking or boating in the lakes, and there's some other stuff to do nearby like Jatayu rock. You'll definitely have to rent a scooter though.

        Allepey/Kumarakom are quite famous as well and for good reason. The backwaters are beautiful and there are a lot of nice resorts along the lake. There's a bird sanctuary nearby that's worth seeing if you like nature walks. You can also stay in the villages around Kottayam if you want a more "authentic" experience away from the tourist spots. Aymanam has a lot of pretty homestays/farmstays and you can just bike around the villages. Honestly this was the highlight of the trip for me; walking around backwater towns at sunset, crossing rickety homemade bridges, kids herding goats in the street, families performing their nightly prayers etc... Really cool experience.

        There are some nice beaches in Mararikulam, and also Cherai which is up near Kochi. Kerala beaches are seasonal and obviously very hit or miss with pollution and overcrowding, but you can usually find a nice isolated place to swim. Fort Kochi might be worth a daytrip but I found it pretty underwhelming.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          [...]

          You should also take a trip into the mountains if you can. I would suck it up and pay for a taxi because the buses are not safe. Really beautiful area though, especially post-monsoon where Hispanices and coffee grow like weeds and the waterfalls are in full flood. We went to Periyar National Park which was pretty cool. They have a lot of activities like bamboo rafting and night walks, but it's pretty expensive and you can't just wander around on your own so plan ahead if you want to go there. And as with most parks don't expect to see any animals besides deer and birds. It's also infested with leeches which the reviews don't mention lmao. The town of Kumily is pretty boring though so just go to the park and head out.

          Munnar is another really popular hillstation in the Western Ghats. It is absolutely worth seeing but DO NOT STAY IN MUNNAR. The city is an overcrowded disaster and you will be miserable. Stay nearby in Idukki which is within driving distance and much quieter and calmer. Usually in Munnar people just rent a car or jeep and hit all the tourist spots. You can do this over two days since there are some really cool places in Idukki too. Most of the attractions here are tea plantations, waterfalls, dams, lakes, and viewpoints. Do some research and avoid the tourist traps like Top Station. Eravikulam National Park is here and it was...okay. You take a terrifying bus ride up to a winding mountain path. There are some goats and pretty scenery and a cafe and small museum. You walk around a bit and then you leave. Like the beaches most of the mountain tourism is really seasonal. If you go after the monsoon it will be lush and verdant but probably overcast and drizzly. You can go during the monsoon but it is India, so expect floods, destroyed roads, torrential rains and blackouts.

          We wanted to go to Wayanad and Kozhikode but just didn't have time. They're really fucking far, a lot farther than it looks on a map.

          https://i.imgur.com/sMBGzAd.jpg

          [...]
          [...]
          Not sure what else to say. The weather is hot and brutally humid but you probably already know that. If you go into the mountains they can get quite chilly, especially during winter, so bring a sweater or jacket.

          If your girlfriend is Mayali I'm sure you've had Keralite food before. Expect everything to taste like coconut lol. The coastal areas are of course famous for seafood, so try to eat your fill because it really is some of the best I've had in the world. Any tourist areas will be full of North Indian and western restaurants also so you can eat whatever you'd like. Breakfast will just be idly, puttu and dosa pretty much everywhere, which gets old after about one day. I really fucking hate puttu but I kept giving it a chance at each new place I stayed. Shoulda just asked for eggs or something.

          English is pretty ubiquitous but the accent incredibly thick and hard to understand (imo). Anyone working in hospitality/service will speak Hindi as well, and if your girlfriend speaks Malayalam you'll have no issues.

          Toddy is worth a try if you've never had it before. Toddy shops can be kinda fun if you wanna chit the chat with the locals. There's also some weird fucking wines in the mountains, like cashew wine and nutmeg wine.

          Anyways, we stayed for I think six weeks and I felt like we saw most of what I wanted to see in the state. One of my favorite trips ever and I've been traveling for most of my life. It's definitively a "hidden gem", in the sense that no one outside India has ever heard of it, although obviously it is quite popular within India. Hope you have a great trip.

          Thanks for the detailed response anon, really appreciate it. I know for a fact we'll be around Kottayam, so I'll be getting some authentic backwaters experience.

          I've had quite a bit of Keralite food before but mostly idly, dosa and curries. It felt pretty light and healthy but yeah, those carb dishes get old after a while. Only so much rice flour-based thing and sambar you can eat. Really looking forward to trying the seafood there. I hear Kozhikode Muslims make some of the best biryani in the world so I'll report back on how that is.

          How did you find getting around? Was it more by car or train?

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            If you're staying along the coast you can easily get around by train. The Southern Railway connects to most of the major districts in the state and from there you can just take a cab/auto to wherever you're going. The exception to this is Western Ghats where there are no railways as far as I know. There aren't even many public buses that run from major cities to the hill stations tbh (and the ones that do exist are at odd hours), so your only options are taxis and private buses. Buses are really unsafe especially around the monsoon; idk if you've ever been to the mountainous regions of India but people drive like fucking maniacs and there are one lane roads with hairpin turns and no guardrails. Me and my girlfriend actually missed a bus from Munnar to Kochi and we were really pissed because we had to stay an extra day at our accommodation. Literally three hours later our AirBNB host called to tell us that that exact same bus drove off a cliff and a bunch of people died. Was like a fucking final destination scene and I was pretty rattled because I nearly got us killed to save like $50. So yea don't take the risk if you go up there and just pay the RS4000 for a taxi.

            Worth noting, idk if you or her are actually from India, but right now paying for things in India is a fucking nightmare for foreigners. You basically can't use any payment methods except UPI and cash. My credit cards very rarely worked and many places will flat out tell you they can't process foreign credit/debit cards. Cash is fine for those situations but trying to order/book things online is a shitshow. I had a lot of issues booking domestic flights and using the IRCTC website was flat out impossible. I ended up having transfer money to my girlfriend's Indian bank account and have her pay for everything using Google Pay. Fucking ridiculous. Maybe some other anon has a solution to this but I was really frustrated and annoyed with the constant payment issues.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Me and my girlfriend just AirBNB'd our way north, starting from Trivandrum. Varkala is absolutely worth a stop for a few days. It's just a spectacular natural environment that I've never seen anywhere else. The cliff is fun with a lot of restaurants and shops. You can go kayaking or boating in the lakes, and there's some other stuff to do nearby like Jatayu rock. You'll definitely have to rent a scooter though.

        Allepey/Kumarakom are quite famous as well and for good reason. The backwaters are beautiful and there are a lot of nice resorts along the lake. There's a bird sanctuary nearby that's worth seeing if you like nature walks. You can also stay in the villages around Kottayam if you want a more "authentic" experience away from the tourist spots. Aymanam has a lot of pretty homestays/farmstays and you can just bike around the villages. Honestly this was the highlight of the trip for me; walking around backwater towns at sunset, crossing rickety homemade bridges, kids herding goats in the street, families performing their nightly prayers etc... Really cool experience.

        There are some nice beaches in Mararikulam, and also Cherai which is up near Kochi. Kerala beaches are seasonal and obviously very hit or miss with pollution and overcrowding, but you can usually find a nice isolated place to swim. Fort Kochi might be worth a daytrip but I found it pretty underwhelming.

        You should also take a trip into the mountains if you can. I would suck it up and pay for a taxi because the buses are not safe. Really beautiful area though, especially post-monsoon where Hispanices and coffee grow like weeds and the waterfalls are in full flood. We went to Periyar National Park which was pretty cool. They have a lot of activities like bamboo rafting and night walks, but it's pretty expensive and you can't just wander around on your own so plan ahead if you want to go there. And as with most parks don't expect to see any animals besides deer and birds. It's also infested with leeches which the reviews don't mention lmao. The town of Kumily is pretty boring though so just go to the park and head out.

        Munnar is another really popular hillstation in the Western Ghats. It is absolutely worth seeing but DO NOT STAY IN MUNNAR. The city is an overcrowded disaster and you will be miserable. Stay nearby in Idukki which is within driving distance and much quieter and calmer. Usually in Munnar people just rent a car or jeep and hit all the tourist spots. You can do this over two days since there are some really cool places in Idukki too. Most of the attractions here are tea plantations, waterfalls, dams, lakes, and viewpoints. Do some research and avoid the tourist traps like Top Station. Eravikulam National Park is here and it was...okay. You take a terrifying bus ride up to a winding mountain path. There are some goats and pretty scenery and a cafe and small museum. You walk around a bit and then you leave. Like the beaches most of the mountain tourism is really seasonal. If you go after the monsoon it will be lush and verdant but probably overcast and drizzly. You can go during the monsoon but it is India, so expect floods, destroyed roads, torrential rains and blackouts.

        We wanted to go to Wayanad and Kozhikode but just didn't have time. They're really fucking far, a lot farther than it looks on a map.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Me and my girlfriend just AirBNB'd our way north, starting from Trivandrum. Varkala is absolutely worth a stop for a few days. It's just a spectacular natural environment that I've never seen anywhere else. The cliff is fun with a lot of restaurants and shops. You can go kayaking or boating in the lakes, and there's some other stuff to do nearby like Jatayu rock. You'll definitely have to rent a scooter though.

        Allepey/Kumarakom are quite famous as well and for good reason. The backwaters are beautiful and there are a lot of nice resorts along the lake. There's a bird sanctuary nearby that's worth seeing if you like nature walks. You can also stay in the villages around Kottayam if you want a more "authentic" experience away from the tourist spots. Aymanam has a lot of pretty homestays/farmstays and you can just bike around the villages. Honestly this was the highlight of the trip for me; walking around backwater towns at sunset, crossing rickety homemade bridges, kids herding goats in the street, families performing their nightly prayers etc... Really cool experience.

        There are some nice beaches in Mararikulam, and also Cherai which is up near Kochi. Kerala beaches are seasonal and obviously very hit or miss with pollution and overcrowding, but you can usually find a nice isolated place to swim. Fort Kochi might be worth a daytrip but I found it pretty underwhelming.

        [...]

        You should also take a trip into the mountains if you can. I would suck it up and pay for a taxi because the buses are not safe. Really beautiful area though, especially post-monsoon where Hispanices and coffee grow like weeds and the waterfalls are in full flood. We went to Periyar National Park which was pretty cool. They have a lot of activities like bamboo rafting and night walks, but it's pretty expensive and you can't just wander around on your own so plan ahead if you want to go there. And as with most parks don't expect to see any animals besides deer and birds. It's also infested with leeches which the reviews don't mention lmao. The town of Kumily is pretty boring though so just go to the park and head out.

        Munnar is another really popular hillstation in the Western Ghats. It is absolutely worth seeing but DO NOT STAY IN MUNNAR. The city is an overcrowded disaster and you will be miserable. Stay nearby in Idukki which is within driving distance and much quieter and calmer. Usually in Munnar people just rent a car or jeep and hit all the tourist spots. You can do this over two days since there are some really cool places in Idukki too. Most of the attractions here are tea plantations, waterfalls, dams, lakes, and viewpoints. Do some research and avoid the tourist traps like Top Station. Eravikulam National Park is here and it was...okay. You take a terrifying bus ride up to a winding mountain path. There are some goats and pretty scenery and a cafe and small museum. You walk around a bit and then you leave. Like the beaches most of the mountain tourism is really seasonal. If you go after the monsoon it will be lush and verdant but probably overcast and drizzly. You can go during the monsoon but it is India, so expect floods, destroyed roads, torrential rains and blackouts.

        We wanted to go to Wayanad and Kozhikode but just didn't have time. They're really fucking far, a lot farther than it looks on a map.

        Not sure what else to say. The weather is hot and brutally humid but you probably already know that. If you go into the mountains they can get quite chilly, especially during winter, so bring a sweater or jacket.

        If your girlfriend is Mayali I'm sure you've had Keralite food before. Expect everything to taste like coconut lol. The coastal areas are of course famous for seafood, so try to eat your fill because it really is some of the best I've had in the world. Any tourist areas will be full of North Indian and western restaurants also so you can eat whatever you'd like. Breakfast will just be idly, puttu and dosa pretty much everywhere, which gets old after about one day. I really fucking hate puttu but I kept giving it a chance at each new place I stayed. Shoulda just asked for eggs or something.

        English is pretty ubiquitous but the accent incredibly thick and hard to understand (imo). Anyone working in hospitality/service will speak Hindi as well, and if your girlfriend speaks Malayalam you'll have no issues.

        Toddy is worth a try if you've never had it before. Toddy shops can be kinda fun if you wanna chit the chat with the locals. There's also some weird fucking wines in the mountains, like cashew wine and nutmeg wine.

        Anyways, we stayed for I think six weeks and I felt like we saw most of what I wanted to see in the state. One of my favorite trips ever and I've been traveling for most of my life. It's definitively a "hidden gem", in the sense that no one outside India has ever heard of it, although obviously it is quite popular within India. Hope you have a great trip.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'd go northern Kerala for desolate beaches, amazing, best beaches ever, then Gokarna. and surrounding, honestly its so nice. gotta get back there

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Gokarna
          Thanks for the rec, looks really good

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've been to India several dozen times and currently live here.

    To be completely honest, India is a flaming dumpster-fire of a country. However, it's a fantastic place to visit if you have some patience and aren't expecting anything other than a typical third-world country with typical third-world country inconveniences. All things considered, people tend to be friendly and welcoming.

    Everything that people say about touts and scams is true, but it's also completely overblown. I've traveled extensively across most parts of India, and I've found that these sorts of hassles are borderline nonexistent outside a scarce handful of areas. For example, you'll be almost constantly bothered by travel agency touts in places like Delhi's Paharganj neighborhood, the Pink City in Jaipur, and anywhere within shooting distance of the Taj Mahal. However, other parts of the same cities--especially those that see few foreign tourists--are comparably tame, and you can explore without having to worry about strangers' poor intentions.

    People in more rural areas will either be quasi-autistically excited to see you or ignore you altogether (although they're usually very friendly if you speak some of their language and say hello).

    IMO, a lot of India's so-called travails can be avoided by simply doing your best to blend in and look confident. I've spent so much fucking time here that I can speak Hindi and two other Indian languages reasonably well. I'm as White as they come, but a lot of people--somehow--assume that I'm either Indian or Anglo-Indian (i.e., my family stayed here after the British Raj came to an end). Literally nobody bothers me when I travel by myself. This isn't because I'm special, it's just because I look comfortable in my surroundings. Tourist touts and con artists can smell "fresh meat" from miles away. If you look like you know where you're going and what you're doing, people stay clear out of your way, both for better and for worse.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Absolutely based as fuck, thanks for sharing anon. I am half Indian and half Irish but grew up in Australia. I'm moving to India in a couple of years. I plan to buy a big property in the Himalayas and live the simple life. Are you married to a local? Do you have a family there?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >For example, you'll be almost constantly bothered by travel agency touts in places like Delhi's Paharganj neighborhood, the Pink City in Jaipur, and anywhere within shooting distance of the Taj Mahal.
      kind of an autistic question but indians are a very non violent people so i was wondering if you can keep a spray bottle full of water and just spritz them whenever they get near you. what do you think would happen if you did this? they wouldn't do anything, right?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Depends. A minority of people wouldn't say anything and would walk away; most would probably yell at you; and some people would immediately start a fight.

        You're less likely to get your shit kicked in as a foreigner, but if you push people here, a lot of them will push back--especially the sorts of lower-income petty criminals who are most likely to be working as tourist touts. Realistically, if you're in reasonably good shape, you could easily win a fight against most Indian guys, but if he has any friends in sight, they're all guaranteed to jump in the second they see shit going down.

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Please do not come to our country

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Best trip I ever went on, god that was the best year of my life. 6 months in India. I highly recommend it.

  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Test

  11. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Never been to the northeast but the southwest is pretty swell. I liked Kerala the most. New Delhi is the most disgusting city I’ve ever been to and I’ve lived in some hardcore Chinese cities

  12. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not much into visiting hell holes, even for shock value, so from what has been described in the thread I think I'll give it a miss. On the other hand my Indian friends seem to regard the place as some sort of heaven, very confusing.

  13. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It is certainly not for everyone. I stayed there 2 weeks, and sometimes I was glad I can go home. When I got home it was really weird that everything is so silent and I don't hear honking 0/24

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >When I got home it was really weird that everything is so silent

      This. LOL, I arrived back to small town Ontario after 6 months in India, it was like coming out of an acid trip.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Really? I came back to Ontario from India and I didn't notice any difference. Still Indian people and businesses everywhere I went.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Awesome pics anon, would love to see more

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Like usual, depends on where you go, but major things i've noticed is that casual sex isn't really a thing here and a lot of people struggle with the food and smells

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    No. You can get dates just by existing and not being repulsively ugly in countries like Thailand and the Philippines, because many women there are unabashed gold-diggers and green card hunters.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Go to Kerala if you want civilization.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    [...]

    lol bro you keep bitching nonstop, I guarantee the reason these posts are getting deleted is because anon has been posting the same “how to creampie pajeetas” shit on multiple threads for the past several weeks

    It’s obviously the same anon doing it over and over again, he’s probably just getting deleted for ban evasion at this point

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Kerala and Kashmir are probably the only states worth visiting. Avoid major populated cities like Mumbai or Delhi. If you're into seeing ancient sites, then they can be found sparsely around the country.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Avoid major populated cities like Mumbai or Delhi

      These are essential part of any India trip. I'd say you haven't really seen India if you dont go the mega cities

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >it’s the same gay posting his pajeeta nonsense AGAIN

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    For the love of god don't fucking go to India

    I beg you

    Just don't do it

    Please

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      moron
      it's one of the biggest and most amazing countries to explore

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's one of the biggest shitholes I've ever been to. Only reason I'm still willing to go there is because my business is willing to write off poojeeta "masseuses" as a business expense. It's honestly the only reason why the fuck any western or Korean/Jap businessman would ever want to go there.

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Its a hot, smelly, filthy, crime ridden shit hole

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I will have only four days in Tamil Nadu between Pondicherry and Chennai.

    I would like to see either temples or visit nature.

    Does anyone have any recommendations for the area?
    Also what is a nice way to travel?
    I suppose hostel travelling is pretty much dead nowadays after covid. But I will be travelling solo and would like to meet some people on the way.

    Thanks for reading hope you have some recommendations.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Haven’t spent much time in the south, but nobody here cares about COVID anymore. My wife’s friend was just in the Himalayas and there were tons of people in hostels (Indians and non-Indians alike)

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Aren't some state still requiring quarantine? Thinking about booking soon for the winter.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Fuck no.

          Maybe some places in the Northeast, but I haven't traveled anywhere inside India in the last 4-5 months that required any sort of testing, quarantine, or proof of vaccination. Most states did away with those requirements in March and April.

          Since August, I've been to:
          >multiple places in West Bengal
          >Jharkhand
          >Odisha
          >Chhattisgarh
          >Andhra Pradesh
          >Telangana
          >Uttar Pradesh
          >Karnataka (twice)
          >Maharashtra
          >Delhi
          ... there's nothing like that happening in any of these states. I've also had friends recently visit Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, and Goa. No news about quarantine of any kind.

          In fact, India--finally--removed all of its COVID-related travel restrictions in mid-November. You don't have to show proof of vaccination or anything else to enter the country. I suppose some states and cities might have their own rules, but I haven't heard of any actually even being enforced. Even when tourism was prohibited, life was more or less ordinary inside the country's borders.

          At this point, COVID may as well have never happened. You still see some people in masks, but everything else is back to normal.

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone cycled/motorcycled around India at all? I've been thinking about doing it, maybe go from south to north. I've met a few people who've done it, but they say it's not that great. I just have few extra months before I hit Central Asia and was thinking to get out of the cold.
    Or does anyone know what price range are hotels around highways/smaller villages? I've only stayed in the Himalayas or the bit more touristy cities, where you could usually find a cheap hotel to stay. Looking online they can be pretty expensive, but they're not all online of course. I've wildcamped in over 30+ countries, but I don't think India is suitable for it. Was thinking just staying in a hotel every night. Just don't know if I have a budget for 30euro nights for a few months.

    I've cycled 25+ countries and around 50tkm+, been in India three times so not exactly new to this.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm the samefag who lives in India. I own a motorbike and recently took a 3,500kms trip across East-Central India. I work remotely and typically need stable internet access every day, so I can't really stay in bottom-of-the-barrel hotels when I'm traveling.

      However, finding inexpensive options isn't particularly difficult, although you might struggle to find hotels that accept foreign guests in isolated or rural areas. IME, this has far less to do with xenophobia than the Indian government's requirement that hotels file reports--Form C--whenever they host foreign guests. These reports have to be filed with the nearest police station within 24 hours of the guest's arrival.

      Nowadays, hotels and guesthouses can fill out Form C online, but you still have to create an account and spend about ~5 minutes entering the traveler's information. A lot of lower-budget facilities either don't know how to do it or receive so few foreign guests that they won't bother.

      Nevertheless, you can typically find homestays and budget hotels for $5-$12 per night, depending on the area and amenities. It's typically best to search options in advance, since showing up in town and searching for a place doesn't always work out. Booking.com and other aggregators will usually indicate whether a property allows foreign guests in its "Property Rules" section.

      >I've met a few people who've done it, but they say it's not that great
      I quite enjoy moto-touring in India. The traffic is actually quite manageable outside of urban areas. If you avoid large, high-volume motorways, you'll often be the only one on the road (with the exception of other motorbikes, cyclists, and the occasional auto-rickshaw).

      Picrel from the Chandil-Gamharia Range in Jharkhand.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Oh: you can probably imagine, but road conditions are extremely variable, especially when you're off established motorways. While driving from Jamshedpur to Rourkela, I intentionally detoured through the Saraikela-Singhbhum Range and took a rural bypass route across the Odisha border. The road condition ranged from "acceptable" to "there is no road."

        IIRC, I was pretty much off-roading through the jungle for about 15 minutes. The road was visible and motorable, but it was more of a goat path or hiking trail than an actual roadway.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Oh: you can probably imagine, but road conditions are extremely variable, especially when you're off established motorways. While driving from Jamshedpur to Rourkela, I intentionally detoured through the Saraikela-Singhbhum Range and took a rural bypass route across the Odisha border. The road condition ranged from "acceptable" to "there is no road."

        IIRC, I was pretty much off-roading through the jungle for about 15 minutes. The road was visible and motorable, but it was more of a goat path or hiking trail than an actual roadway.

        Nice, sounds like a good trip.
        >It's typically best to search options in advance, since showing up in town and searching for a place doesn't always work out.
        Sounds a like a good idea. Usually I just go and camp, get a place if there is one. Not in India though. Maybe I will try to plot a route, and try to see if I can make a route through India with places to stay every ~100km.

        I was thinking maybe switching my tires to some more offroad ones, but I'm continuing to Azerbaijan and Europe from there, so maybe rough it out on the ones I got & trust.

        Do you know is it safe to camp around India at all? I don't mean to do it, but sometimes things happen and might not make to the next hotel/destination before sunset, so putting a camp is one option. Mostly worried about the reptiles and bugs that are out there to kill me.

        This my bicycle, basic set, but works.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          bump. same question. coming from nepal and wondering if I should just stick to northeast and then fly somewhere else or take the plunge and bike from Agra to the coast at Surat and down to Sri Lanka.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        kino pic

        Did you ever go to Hampi? Nice rides around there

  25. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm thinking about sailing to India but is there really only one marina on their entire coast? Do they not enjoy boating or something?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kochi_International_Marina

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      check out routesofchange dot org

  26. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone got any experience of renting bikes or electric scooters bellow 50cc? Maybe even electric bicycles? Since for that you don't need driving license.

    Would love to explore rural parts for a few days with one.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah, in Hampi you can rent gas motorbikes for the day, a blend of scooter and motorbike. Nice to ride around the countryside doing that, also the best way to get to homestays away from the main area. highly recommend it, they don't ask a passport or anything, no license needed.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm just checking and there are mopeds to rent in Hampi which don't require licence. Might inlcude Hampi in my itinerary just because of that, thanks for info!

        My only problem with bikes above 50cc is that insurance wont cover anything in case of accident.

        If anyone knows any places where you can rent bikes that don't need licence, please post them here.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >If anyone knows any places where you can rent bikes that don't need licence
          Pretty much any individual or family-owned motorcycle rental store in Goa or Himachal Pradesh. I'm not sure about Hampi and its surroundings. They may not ask for a license, but you'll be in a world of trouble if you're stopped by the police--especially in Goa, where the police actually know which documents foreign drivers do and don't need.

          Also, do you not have ANY license? You don't need a motorbike license or endorsement to rent from most non-franchised shops in India, but I'd imagine not having any driver's license could be problematic. However, you can still probably skirt the requirement by fronting additional money for your deposit, I guess.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I have AM licence, which is just for mopeds (50cc or less and max speed of 50km/h), that's why I'm looking for those since everything will be legit.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >but you'll be in a world of trouble if you're stopped by the police

            No you won't.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >I'm just checking and there are mopeds to rent in Hampi which don't require licence.

          Yup it's common to do there. Best way to see the surrounding country side.

  27. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I kind of want to visit India despite hearing about what a vile shithole it is. Sounds kind of interesting.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's not a shit hole at all and 10/10 interesting. Certain portions of the major cities are poverty stricken and dirty but the country side is beautiful, the tropical south idyllic, it truly embodies the best and worst of society. Some of the most fucked up you can see there and most beautiful. My favourite country I have been to. The >shithole stuff is a trv meme. Even the pic for this thread, the railway line in my country is also filled with garbage and homeless camps, now if a billion plus people were living here it would look the same. Showing a dirty rail line as some sort of image to shock is kind of a sheltered pov, unless you live in Switzerland, all rail tracks are dirty.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Anon Ive been to over 30 countries in 5 continents and India is by far the biggest shithole. Makes Brazil and Thailand look like Switzerland. I haven't been to Pakistan and Afghanistan but if I really have to compare your country to those shitholes than it just proves it's a shithole. Maybe in 20 years the country will reach Vietnam levels of development. However one thing that needs changing is the mentality of the people, poos are essentially ants and will do whatever their queen (parents) tell them to do even if it goes against common sense.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Shut up

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >poos are essentially ants and will do whatever their queen (parents) tell them to do even if it goes against common sense.
          how u know

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Dude the second the airplane door opened in India I was hit with a wave of shit smell. My clothes that I brought back had to be thrown away because they smelt so bad.

  28. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Fuck the haters, sounds like a blast. Gonna see if I can get a one way ticket and escape this american hell-hole.

  29. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    India is a giant open sewer filled to bursting with ugly, smelly people with bad breath and b.o
    It's noisy, dusty, and ridiculously hot...like "this is too much" kind of hot.
    All that being said, it has something about it that is captivating and fascinating.
    It's so vast and complicated that you need to dedicate at least 6 months to really get a feel for the place.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >6 months in India
      don't do this to yourself. I spent 3 months there and only after 2 months I already had enough. I got more irritated. snapped easily. that place wore down my psyche like no other. oh and don't bring a woman.

  30. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    any good places to see in Mumbai?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >any good places to see in Mumbai?

      your mom

  31. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I would like to try some authentic street shitting.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Foreigners have ruined street shitting in India. They all come to India now for "the authentic Indian street shitting experience" and pay $200 for Mahesh to take them on a tour of "the dirty streets of Mumbai", but it's just a joke for the tourists. Mahesh had four toilets at home.

  32. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    How’s Goa bros?

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