Is altitude sickness really that bad?

Is altitude sickness really that bad?

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  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes. Flying into Cuzco on a hangover was probably one of the most brutal acclimatisation experiences I’ve ever had. I had been in the Himalayas a month before but walked up to high altitude, but flying in was a whole other level of pain.

    It wasn’t just the hangover either as I’d been eating hash and drinking straight gin the whole time we were in the Himalayas

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      take acetazolamide 125mg. G oogle it. Tried it in Cusco two weeks ago for the salkantay trek. didn't feel a thing

    • 3 months ago
      Cult of Passion

      >Flying into Cuzco on a hangover was probably one of the most brutal acclimatisation experiences I’ve ever had.
      Ha. Mine was returning from an Amazon tour from Cusco, spent a day in bed when we got back.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Cuzco didn't affect me at all (coming from Lima). But I did drink plenty of coca leaf tea, so maybe that does work.

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I tried to hike Pikes Peak and couldn't stop puking.

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm from California but was born in Colorado. I don't get it. Maybe its in my blood, so to speak. The only thing I really notice is being more winded going on hikes that are like 10,000 ft+. I don't notice a difference below around 7500 feet. Cusco is up there so I might find myself more drowsy than normal but I've never had actual issues. I've never done anything that crazy like above the 14k mark common to American mountians. Some people seem to really get affected by it, even in low-ish areas like 4500 ft. Must be weak DNA. I'm sure exercise, healthy diet and not being a humongous lush or druggie helps. Obviously you shouldn't smoke tobacco and probably not cannabis either if you're worried.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Did you go there suddenly or not, that's all what matters.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I can only speak upon anecdotes that are probably psychosomatic. I got the ass-mahr and live at 176m above sea level. I'm on my last week of 3 week vacation at 2066m. I find I'm out of breathe quicker. Allergens such as bird dust, pollen, and smoke seem to affect me much more. I feel generally okay nonetheless. No mental fog or asthma attacks thankfully.

      I envy these anons.

      https://i.imgur.com/uLUtdCw.jpg

      I walked up the gravel road to the 15,000 ft summit of Sierra Negra a couple years back. Did not feel dizzy or even get out of breath, despite walking at a brisk pace. At the top I felt a little buzzy, but no unpleasant effects. I'd spent the previous weeks in the 4000-5000' elevation range (Oaxaca and Tehuacan). Being a weedgay helps hugely. Hiking at altitude after taking some deep hits of smoke forces your body to become very efficient at absorbing oxygen, as carbon monoxide can deactivate up to a third of your hemoglobin with heavy smoking. However, elevations above 18,000' would still be tough, especially if you are LARPing as a donkey and carrying a bunch of shit on your back.

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It depends on the person and your fit level. When I was at the everest base camp (5300m) I was totally ok while I saw many normies with oxygen mask.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Depends... I already feel lightheaded around 3500m, so if I was with he would probably make fun of me. But like sherpas don't have much problems either. Depends on what you're used to, how fast you got up there etc. If I spend a few days around 2000m, I have zero problems up to 4000m. From 500m to 3500m however within an hour or two was a bit too much however.

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Depends if you normally take deep or shallow breathes when you breathe involuntarily

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It can be, depending on a huge range of factors, including but absolutely not limited to fitness, relative altitude, etc. In particular, exertion at altitude can make a lot of people sicker than they expect, even if they’re in good shape.

    I’m in pretty bad but not embarrassing shape—I’m not very strong, and my cardiovascular stamina isn’t great, but I’m not significantly overweight, and I do a lot of biking and low-to-medium-intensity hikes in the Alps—and I noticed the effects of the altitude when I visited La Paz, Bolivia. No nausea or vomiting, but I was distinctly lightheaded for a couple of days, and I became winded and tired more easily than I would have at home (where I lived barely above sea level). I can easily believe that someone in even worse shape than me or trying to exert himself at a higher altitude could suffer.

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    have you ever seen that movie kingsman? they have a scene on a cable car up the alps. the cable car exists and you can pay bored italians to let you go up it. they spent a hundred million euros building it

    anyway that's how I learned that sudden increases in altitude are no joke, was feeling breathless just walking around at the top and got vertigo. I'm reasonably fit even by normie standards just not used to 11,000+ft altitude

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >all thoose comments saying fitness matters
    >the medical literature says fitness doesnt matter at all and its more to be with the CNS development and thats why the effects have an inverse relationship with the persons age
    Uh?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I am the everest base camp guy above. Fitness surely matters, I was the fittest in my life when I was there, and as I told in this thread I was allright while some people were dropping like flies. But there were many fat, old people which had no problem.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Citing anecdotal evidence to prove your point, then citing more anecdotal evidence that disproves your point.
        You should check out /x/, you'd fit in well there.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          What if he meant old and fat people with high fitness levels?

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Come on now bro

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It bothered me when I was a kid but not anymore. I used to get a headache above tree line. Now I can go to the top of Pikes Peak and feel fine.

  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Never gotten altitude sickness, thankfully, but you can definitely tell the difference. I was out of breath after walking up a small hill at 10,000 ft, and it took me several minutes to climb up a steep hill at 11k

  11. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Altitude effects are a nuisance. Altitude sickness is a whole other kettle of fish, and can frick you up for life or kill you. They are very different things.

  12. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I walked up the gravel road to the 15,000 ft summit of Sierra Negra a couple years back. Did not feel dizzy or even get out of breath, despite walking at a brisk pace. At the top I felt a little buzzy, but no unpleasant effects. I'd spent the previous weeks in the 4000-5000' elevation range (Oaxaca and Tehuacan). Being a weedgay helps hugely. Hiking at altitude after taking some deep hits of smoke forces your body to become very efficient at absorbing oxygen, as carbon monoxide can deactivate up to a third of your hemoglobin with heavy smoking. However, elevations above 18,000' would still be tough, especially if you are LARPing as a donkey and carrying a bunch of shit on your back.

  13. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Went for daily 4km walks for months before my trip to Peru. I was expecting the worst when landing in Cuzco; I could feel the air was thinner in my breathing, however I immediately left for Ollantaytambo and acclimated there which was recommended. Felt fine there and by the time I went back to Cuzco I cant say I had any severe issues, but I was definitely out of breath from walking up hills and the like.

  14. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It can be. I went to Tibet with my mother for her 50th B day several years ago and she was sick AF for the first few days. I was totally fine - you could tell the air was thinner, but I never felt ill or was even out of breath. She was more healthy and fitter than I was and had trekked in the Himalayas the year before with no issues - and yet for a little while we thought we might have to cancel the trip she was so ill.

    It seems pretty random, though the older and less fit/ have asthma obviously its more likely to be worse.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I've heard that going to an intermediate height helps a lot.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It can knock some people on their ass. Even taking a couple of days to set in.
    I spent time acclimatising in the foothills before going up the Himalayas and on to the Tibetan Plateau. Noticed that I took longer to recover after sprinting up a hill. I was doing a lot of running at the time.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've lived in Colorado my whole life, above 10000ft is where I start to notice, had the worst hangover in my life camping up there so start off slow if you drink. If you don't have any medical conditions you should be fine for normal stuff. They have those cans of air, not sure how well they work but a lot of people buy them. Just take it easy at first, you will wind quicker than you normally do.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Altitude sickness is a meme. I climbed Mt Fuji in a single day without stopping and I didn't feel a thing.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I climbed mount meme
      Weebs were a mistake

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Have you, sweaty?

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah it can be bad.
    When we climbed El Teide in Tenerife (3715m) you had to stay overnight in the hut just below at 3200m if you wanted to reach the summit.
    I forgot to take Aspirin before bed (or I thought I'd be fine) and had the most horrendous nightmares and headache when I woke up. Frick me it was painful!

    Threw my guts out walking up, my b***h sister kept in telling me to turn around. Aspirin kicked in and I was fine.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      How technical was the climb though?

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I was a park ranger at a national park 4k-5k high in the Andes. Altitude sickness varies from person to person. But be aware the range is insane

    I was 18 so I literally played football with other teenagers at 4.8k. Most people dont get it. But the ones who do... its not a light headache. I had a mom who dropped like a sack of potatoes during a hike at 4.2k. All the family turned to me and all I could say was relax people, give her some air, lol. She recovered after a few seconds and we continued very slowly but I was shitting my pants lol

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      4800 meters! Damn, I tried a light jog at 4200 meters on level ground and had been there a week. After 25 m, I was keeled over trying not to pass out while trying catch my breath.

      Somebody told me this is what it feels like when offing yourself with cyanide.

      Would not recommend,

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        There are professional football teams based in cities at 4.3 and 4.2 in Peru and Bolivia (Cerro de Pasco and El Alto). They play there every fortnight lol. The Peruvian experience is worse because most away teams are from Lima which is at sea level lmao

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There's more myth than science around this issue, my personal anecdote is as counter productive as everyone else's personal anecdotes.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Folks who are not regular athletes tend to adjust better to high altitudes than athletes. That's not just anecdotal. Research is actively being performed in this area. One such place is White Mountain Research Center in eastern Central California in the White Mountains. They've got three high elevation stations of which two are manned in the summer. The highest is a summit hut which isn't used due to Hanta virus.

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