Need tips on moving to the Rep. of Ireland

Life happens and I found myself making a good wage (for Portugal) bur not being able to afford rents. So my current plan is to move to Ireland in the summer.

would love it if you help me out at least in the beginning stages with sorting out these two options.

Option #1
drive to ireland on my twingo taking the train/ferry to england first and then taking the ferry to either rosslare, dublin or belfast whichever is cheapest.
>but why?
the car would prevent me from literally being on the street in the first few weeks of being there while I attempt to sort some kind of accomodation, job and pps number.
car would also allow me to go anywhere in Ireland where i can get those things since I know transportation can be iffy.

option #2
dont take the car. fly there and stay in hostels till i manage to get a job, pps number and a bedroom.
this would limit me to places like Dublin and Cork

I don't have any skills in particular and I am middle aged. Finishing a humanities degree as we speak and would like to later on get into a masters program on information sciences (MLIS)
I would like to know what towns you recommend, what towns you dont
I like smaller places as opposed to big, so Dublin and Cork are kinda meh, Limerick and Portlaoise are kinda cool size wise.
I noticed the last few times you have a lot of churches everywhere, is it a problem that I am a Quaker? Should I not tell that to people?
Will my accent be a problem? I speak with a fluent american southern accent
Are car inspections stringent? Are there ways of testing my twingo before I'd attempt to make it legal?
How long would I be able to drive there before the gardai gives me shit for being there with the car over six months?

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  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    mate if you can't afford portugal, you'll not afford dublin or Belfast, give us a figure

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Im not going to dublin or belfast.
      I cant afford Portugal because I am making 26k a year, which puts me into the 90th percentile of income here and rents are 900 a month for a shithole.
      I seen on daft that I can get a bedroom anywhere between 600 and a 1000 but your minimum wage is what my current wage is now. There would be a chance to grow eventually. Currently im just looking to survive. I have about six months before I go.

      Ireland is probably less affordable than Portugal, mate.

      While this is true in a sense. I don't have any other options, I can't get any higher of an income in Portugal.

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ireland is probably less affordable than Portugal, mate.

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Oh boy another lusophone in Ireland. yay
    You could drive up to France and get the ferry there (if it's not up and running now it will be in the summer).
    That said based on this and your follow-up you'd be well better off getting the masters before moving. Why move to a place that's well more expensive where you'll make a low wage and end up flat sharing in some shithole (Dublin or Cork) even with the car (keep in mind most places outside those cities are horrific for finding accommodation unless you want a literal shed for a house).
    >is it a problem that I am a Quaker? Should I not tell that to people?
    Yes we burn Quakers at the stake.
    Jokes aside nobody gives a shit really. Religion is well in decline because this is now Progressive Ireland where instead of the Church being the State, the State is the Church.
    Will my accent be a problem?
    No. If you were to do Uber Eats or janitorial work you'd blend in with the rest of them.
    >Are car inspections stringent?
    As long as there's no big issues it's not too bad. Get the car checked by a mechanic (don't get a pre-NCT it's pointless compared to just getting a normal checkup) and make sure the car is clean and the main functions work. That said there's a big delay in getting tests unless you luck into one that's on the website that's a few weeks away (usually ones that got cancelled by others). If you fail you get a quick retest thoughever.
    >How long would I be able to drive there before the gardai gives me shit for being there with the car over six months?
    I'm pretty sure that's not an issue with a car from the EU but I'm not familiar. Just keep it up to date with Portuguese tax/standards until you get that sorted in Ireland.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Oh boy another lusophone in Ireland. yay
      yay
      >better off getting the masters before moving
      the masters here would be worthless in any english speaking country because you guys have a regulatory body that accredits these master programs, one for the usa, one for ireland and one for the uk, aus, nz. it would however be a lot cheaper to get here.
      >Why move to a place that's well more expensive where you'll make a low wage and end up flat sharing
      What do you suggest I do instead? Because that would be my fate no matter what eu country I pick, but at least in Ireland I wouldn't have to learn a new language.
      >the car is clean and the main functions work
      the car has had a lot of work done recently and its in good shape, but no heating currently. It passes inspection here like this, i imagine in Ireland no heating would probably be a fail
      >No. If you were to do Uber Eats or janitorial work you'd blend in with the rest of them.
      Not planning on doing uber anything, Ive seen plenty of jobs I could do but no one will even contact me without an irish phone number or a presence in Ireland.
      >keep in mind most places outside those cities are horrific for finding accommodation
      what makes this so difficult?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >the masters here would be worthless in any english speaking country because you guys have a regulatory body that accredits these master programs
        I would think that there would be recognition if the course gives ECTS credits. Otherwise I would question the value of that degree.
        >What do you suggest I do instead? Because that would be my fate no matter what eu country I pick, but at least in Ireland I wouldn't have to learn a new language.
        I'll put it this way with no skills you're not getting a job that pays out more than 35-40K per annum at best. Ireland is one of the most expensive countries for cost of living in Europe with a shortage of properties both rental and to purchase (you wouldn't be able to get a mortgage earning less than 45K anyway) so yes you would be better off living in Portugal getting that degree and potentially saving up (unless you had to move here for it) then moving over here with the ability to get a job that would afford living here.
        >the car
        I don't think there's a part of the NCT that covers heating so you should be fine actually. Granted you'll be freezing for a good few months of the year.
        >Ive seen plenty of jobs I could do but no one will even contact me without an irish phone number or a presence in Ireland.
        Probably not
        >what makes this so difficult?
        There's barely frick all there to rent. Go look up on Daft the rental properties available for <€1500 a month in Kildare (which keep in mind is the county next to Dublin and part of the commuter belt). All you'll see is a bunch of done up sheds, granny flats, places out in the middle of nowhere (ie: no transport, no services probably no shops bar a grocery store) or maybe at best a couple of built-for-purpose rental properties (of mixed quality).

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Portugal isn’t as low cost as you’re making it out to be. Rents and property prices here at the the same level of Amsterdam and that’s not hyperbole.
          >value of the degree is questionable then
          Academically the value is equal, but on the job market it’s value on the English speaking world is worthless coming from Portugal because no employer wants to touch an information science that is not either recognised by the American library association, Cilip or the Irish library association which has a different name I think.

          I am not looking to rent an entire place for myself or getting a mortgage. I already have a mortgage man I have a condo here and it’s in great shape but like I said life happens. My parents lease is up, they’re also retiring there is nothing to rent under 800, so I’m going to let them take my place and live there and that’s why I’m going to try my luck in Ireland.
          I also happen to hate my job and any other job I take means a pay cut going from 1250 a month to 800 or 750 a month.

          I could go elsewhere but I’m not going to learn the language, I don’t want to be in that position of not being able to communicate. I speak fluent English. 35k would be an improvement for me, I’m willing to try different things who knows maybe after I’m there I can get the plumbing apprenticeship I been wanting to do. But I appreciate all the tips. If you see a twingo with portuguese plates come say hi!

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes and Ireland is just that bit more expensive while also being less available. Add to that the cost of non-rent items like electricity/gas, food etc which I can guarantee is much higher than Portugal.
            >Academically the value is equal, but on the job market it’s value on the English speaking world is worthless coming from Portugal because no employer wants to touch an information science that is not either recognised by the American library association, Cilip or the Irish library association which has a different name I think.
            I'd get in touch with them and see if the masters in Portugal (or wherever you may go) can be accredited (many of these institutions will get in touch with the university for you), but otherwise then in that case you're better off coming here as a student first which would mean saving up somewhere else. 35K might sound like an improvement but it'll be well offset by aforementioned cost of living (one of the highest in the world).
            >I am not looking to rent an entire place for myself or getting a mortgage
            As I would've guessed but just be warned there's a high chance of your accommodation being shit. If that's fine it's fine.
            >who knows maybe after I’m there I can get the plumbing apprenticeship I been wanting to do
            Now this changes a lot because I would wonder why you'd do this degree thing then move on to plumbing when that has plenty of money in it (even in Ireland) AND you could make money through the apprenticeship as opposed to struggling through getting this degree. Picrel is the salary range for a plumber, which I'd say is well more worth it.
            >If you see a twingo with portuguese plates come say hi!
            Don't worry I'll have Pearse Street's finest to look out for it!

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              The plumbing apprenticeship is something I been wanting to do for years and again I have the same issue, training doesn’t really exist in Portugal because of burocracy. I’d have to be unemployed and they’d have to have open vacancies and all that shit so it doesn’t exist.

              I’ve applied for a few years for Irish apprenticeships and I have the same problem because you can’t get an apprenticeship without a safe pass or material handling cert, or a pps. And you can’t get none of it unless you straight up move there anyways.
              >why the worthless humanities degree
              To prove to myself that I can do it. And the masters isn’t worthless but it doesn’t pay extraordinarily well, no. I been getting the degree while working full time and it’s hard I’ll never shit on anyone who has a humanities degree again but I do understand that it is not extremely valuable.

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I got citizenship through my grandparents, just do that

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I don’t understand what you mean?
      I am Portuguese

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        You don't have Irish grandparents? Are you stupid?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >moron diaspora doesn't understand the Schengen Area
          Please jump into the nearest sea/ocean and don't come back.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Ireland isn't in the Schengen Area

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              Sorry the European Single Market. Still if you're the same guy please do as I said before.

              The plumbing apprenticeship is something I been wanting to do for years and again I have the same issue, training doesn’t really exist in Portugal because of burocracy. I’d have to be unemployed and they’d have to have open vacancies and all that shit so it doesn’t exist.

              I’ve applied for a few years for Irish apprenticeships and I have the same problem because you can’t get an apprenticeship without a safe pass or material handling cert, or a pps. And you can’t get none of it unless you straight up move there anyways.
              >why the worthless humanities degree
              To prove to myself that I can do it. And the masters isn’t worthless but it doesn’t pay extraordinarily well, no. I been getting the degree while working full time and it’s hard I’ll never shit on anyone who has a humanities degree again but I do understand that it is not extremely valuable.

              Then in that case I think you have to move, get the certs (I actually had both at one point, piss easy and they take a couple of days combined) and get the PPS (probably takes longer but not long enough to be prohibitive). Then apply for the apprenticeship. Guarantee you'd have it in a month or two max.
              Then you can get your degree if you feel you want it once you have steady pay as a plumber.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                What did you get the certs for?
                >PPS (probably takes longer but not long enough to be prohibitive)
                This is the great beurocratic conundrum.
                For a PPS you need a utility bill in your name or a letter from the property owner stating you're living there (hostel, hotel, landlord, what have you)
                And you need a job and you have to be on emergency tax for a while and it may take anywhere from two months to longer from what I've read but I'd say mileage will vary.
                I'm glad to hear you say id get such an apprenticeship that quick but it would take a while to get the PPS and the certs together.
                But I think plumbing work would be both cool and pay off in the future.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                For a summer job. Literally a day or two for the Safe Pass and a half day for the manual handling if I recall.
                As for the PPS I mean once you have your appartment you're sorted. Get the job and while you get fricked over in emergency tax you get that back at the end of the year.

                I thought that good jobs were far more gated behind Masters and PhDs in Eurostan than the US, where most Masters are jokes or for international students to game immigration. Is that wrong?

                To a degree they are, depends on the job. There's certain professions where it's almost a requirement but I think that's the same in the US anyway at least to some extent.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              Obvious larp thread since OP doesn't even know basic info

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                Sorry the European Single Market. Still if you're the same guy please do as I said before.
                [...]
                Then in that case I think you have to move, get the certs (I actually had both at one point, piss easy and they take a couple of days combined) and get the PPS (probably takes longer but not long enough to be prohibitive). Then apply for the apprenticeship. Guarantee you'd have it in a month or two max.
                Then you can get your degree if you feel you want it once you have steady pay as a plumber.

                Doesn’t matter. Schengen is about free movement without borders.
                However any eu citizen is entitled to live and work in any eu member country and Ireland is a member country.
                In practice what this means is to go live and work in Ireland you need a PPS number which is attributed to you, as in it is not a given that any eu citizen can automatically without any paperwork simply live and work, paperwork is required.

                That wasn't OP I just mixed up my European agreements. I have my criticisms of OP's thought process but he seems to have looked into this way more than it being a LARP you tard.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              Doesn’t matter. Schengen is about free movement without borders.
              However any eu citizen is entitled to live and work in any eu member country and Ireland is a member country.
              In practice what this means is to go live and work in Ireland you need a PPS number which is attributed to you, as in it is not a given that any eu citizen can automatically without any paperwork simply live and work, paperwork is required.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Sounds like you are the confused one

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >no marketable skills
    >humanities degree
    >from low status country too
    >wants a masters degree in another worthless field
    >move to a country that has a UK tier CoL and Italy tier wages
    Seriously, OP, come on.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      What do you suggest instead? Everywhere is like this anymore. Except maybe Germany but they speak kraut man.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Quit fricking around, honestly. I hate the idea that a university degree is only to get a good paying job but you're too old to be doing the "just get a degree bro you'll get hired somewhere" thing. College is a waste of a lot of time spent on bullshit that only academia cares about, I speak from experience. If that's what you want to do, ok, but if you're 20 years from retirement age you need to figure it out soon. If you want to go into a trade, do that. There's a lot of demand in Germany iirc. If you want to go into academia get a masters degree but pick something. And not library science that has weak demand.
        Honestly you should probably just do the apprenticeship thing and if that's easiest in Ireland then do that.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          I thought that good jobs were far more gated behind Masters and PhDs in Eurostan than the US, where most Masters are jokes or for international students to game immigration. Is that wrong?

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            The euro job market is weaker than than the anglosphere (due to overregulation imo) so yeah but OP seems to not know what he wants to do (which in europe sucks because they make changing careers hard, for example, its difficult to transition between the public and private sector unlike the UK or US) but OP wants a masters degree in "information science" which is a fancy way to say "being a librarian." It's not a degree in IT. That's cool but how many libraries are there, really?

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              its a way in to the civil service.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              >"information science" which is a fancy way to say "being a librarian." It's not a degree in IT
              Wow, OP absolutely KWAB'd his career. I thought it meant IT, not library management.

              For a summer job. Literally a day or two for the Safe Pass and a half day for the manual handling if I recall.
              As for the PPS I mean once you have your appartment you're sorted. Get the job and while you get fricked over in emergency tax you get that back at the end of the year.
              [...]
              To a degree they are, depends on the job. There's certain professions where it's almost a requirement but I think that's the same in the US anyway at least to some extent.

              >To a degree they are, depends on the job. There's certain professions where it's almost a requirement but I think that's the same in the US anyway at least to some extent.
              In the US, very few degrees require a masters. It's usually a stepping stone for a doctorate, so few people just stop there.

              There are a few fintech and quant things that want at least a Masters, but they usually prefer PhDs. It does start you at a higher GS level in the civil service, but spending 5-figures on a Masters for a GS-9 is boneheaded.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                >library management
                that is only one of the few career opportunities for the masters, there is other things like museums, archives, information flow design for corporations, civil service and others. Lots of remote job opportunities as well

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'm thinking about specific professions like accounting, law etc. which have bodies with membership requirements.

                Man, Europe is so poor and backwards. No wonder they are all desperate to move to Canada lmfao

                And then move right back when they realise how much more miserable Canukistan is. I know of multiple people who've done this.

              • 3 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'd totally do the van dwelling/migrant job route in Europe if it is at all possible, but I bet that with address requirements in each member state its pretty much impossible

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          I understand and respect your sentiment about academia, my intent with the degree was always to get into the information science masters program, it just so happens that if its accredited by the regulatory body in an english speaking country, your chances of professional success at least exist, i dont make these bullshit rules up its just the way the world works.
          I truly don't feel like I have wasted time getting this degree, which if it all goes well, I will finish by summer time around the time I will be going to Ireland.
          The apprenticeship was always a goal of mine, but you cant do it without moving there first and getting your ducks in a row with documentation and a place to stay.
          I have been working full time for the last seven years at my particular job and at least in that time I worked on a getting a degree on my spare time, and it is a good stepping stone to the masters I have a real interest in. Who knows I may even do the apprenticeship first and then the masters, why would that be wasting time?
          education does round you up as an individual and at least i find value in that. This particular masters is for more than just libraries by the way.

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Man, Europe is so poor and backwards. No wonder they are all desperate to move to Canada lmfao

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Australian here,

    setting up in Ireland as a home base to travel EU for a year or so, I have a trade qualification and a university degree both construction related (carpentry)

    Will I struggle to find a job and housing? (looking at Cork or Dublin)

    what tips can you give me? I have heard finding a place to stay may be difficult, money isn't really an issue as I will be working

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      You will not struggle with a job at all, you could practically open up shop by yourself.
      Housing is trickier.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      For housing you'd be better off in Cork. I'd say you could get something good at a commutable distance for cheaper, Dublin is a miss. Plus there's a lot of construction in Cork so it'd be decent job-wise.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        You will not struggle with a job at all, you could practically open up shop by yourself.
        Housing is trickier.

        I have made a rough list here,

        1. Obtain a visa, at this stage I am going to obtain a working holiday visa within the next few weeks. Which allows me to work for six months with only one employer. Then employer depending possibly upgrade this visa in the future for a long-stay alternative.

        2. Obtain a GNIB registration card upon arrival.

        3. Obtain a PPSN card upon arrival.

        4. Exchange driver license for Irish license.

        5. Find place to live (Cork, sublet for a month than try my luck)

        6. Obtain bank account.

        7. Finally obtain job.

        Is the order of this correct? assuming I need a job before I obtain a house, and a bank account before I obtain a job?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          I'd say there's a fair chance you could get a work visa before coming here, but I suppose you could just come here on holiday first just to check).
          In terms of renting you'd be best served doing what you said but be warned shit's expensive here.
          That ordering would be correct, though it should be as easy as setting one up online or using Revolut (which is commonly used here).

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    you can get a ferry from spain to ireland, yo udon't need to go to the UK.
    don't think about living in your car any more than a couple of days or unless you are constantly moving. find a hostel dorm. or camp somewhere.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I know about the ferry from Spain, it’s just price dependent, it may be cheaper to go the uk route in the summer than to take it from Bilbao or Santander.

      Yes I’d be on the move, I wouldn’t stay more than one night in one spot. Trouble I see is there seems to be little to no parking that is free or in nature which is a pity. I never seen showers in circle k but I’m guessing truck stops might have them?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hi guys, I think I might try asking stuff here before opening a new thread
    I'm a spaniard that wants to visit Ireland this year.

    I'm not sure what's the best place to visit. I'm interested in both rural and more crowded places.
    Massive bonus points if it's a rainy place (I love rain and it barely fricking rains in this hellhole).

    Also, is the pronunciation challenging for a foreigner? I've been able to talk with english people with no issues at all except in Newcastle, England, where I couldn't fricking understand them the first couple days.

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