Non-balkan eastern europe

Anyone willing to share some travel experience of that area? Mainly Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Czech Republic, maybe Belarus. How the people were, nice places, interesting happenings etc.

  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >fly to Budapest for a layover, one night
    >Don't know what I'm doing, make it to the center and book a hostel
    >All is good, didn't realise they didn't use euros because poor but can use debit at reception
    >Hostel costs like 13 euros
    >Go out and take photos all day since that's my hobby
    >Buy a beer and some dinner and go back to eat it in the hostel
    >Chitchat with random people
    >Eventually get a crew to go out with, a Pakistani guy and Chinese-canadian girl
    >We drink at a great bar and all trauma dump about our families
    >All go out to a dance club and dance
    >Pakistani buys drinks and has to leave to catch a flight
    >Just me and the Asian girl, I'm a little over 20 and she's about 10 years older than me
    >We dance and I realise that we have our bodies grinding against each other, touching and it's getting wild
    >I kiss her, she goes absolutely wild kissing me back, never seen someone so into it
    >We go back to the hostel
    >Get in the shower and continue making out
    >I start undressing her while touching her and she smiles at me and says "so aggressive;)" which just turns me on more
    >She gets on her knees and literally starts sucking the soul out of my sick like a pornstar, never had a blowjob like it since
    >I bend her over and start fucking her raw because I am a retard who had been drinking
    >Legit feels like 10/10 pussy, she has a nice thin body because Asian
    >Try some different positions and I come inside of her
    >It takes her a while to realise and she's like wtf you came inside of me?
    >Uh, yeah
    >I'm not on the pill
    >Oh
    >I was going to let you come in my mouth too...
    >Fuck
    >She is annoyed, I made a huge load in there so she had to shower for long
    >We eventually get in bed together and sleep, I keep groping her in bed for a while
    >Fall asleep
    >Wake up for flight
    >She asks if I can't stay with her for the next two weeks
    >Can't because I have projects I have to honour
    >Pay her 35 euros for the doctors consultation and meds for pill

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Well cool but thats just tourist interaction that could happen anywhere

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      You shagged a non slavic girl in a non Slavic country. Can you at least speak some Russian?

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Can you at least speak some russian?
        If you want to insult him, just call him a retard, no need for all these gymnastics.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      In this story I am always the Paki who notices when things are happening and dips out.

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm half Polish and seen most of the country.
    The South is nice, the area around Krakow, Zywiec, Bielsko-Biala. Just under no circumstances go there in winter. Smog is a massive problem, and if you have respiratory problems you'll be fucked.
    Krakow is unfortunately full of annoying fucks trying to sell you tours and trinkets nowadays, 5 years ago this was not the case still, I don't know what happened honestly. But it's annoying being bothered by subhumans trying to sell you shit, even though you obviously look local.
    I'd avoid Katowice and the general area around it known as "Aglomeracja", unless you're interested in coal mining and old industry. Not worth visiting imo.
    Wroclaw is nice. Pretty town center, the outskirts are well maintained, lots of new housing being built for young families. Nice bicycle lanes if you're into that and the surrounding area also it's nice for cycling or hiking. You can visit Gora Sleza, about an hour away by car, they have some old statues/artifacts from way before, when Slavic tribes inhabited these lands and prayed to bear- and thunder gods.
    Warsaw city center is nice, but touristy. If you wanna get a taste of how real Warsovians live, go to Praga Poludnie. The architecture is horrible: old, ugly blocks. BUT bars that are frequented solely by locals, local pierogi vendors. This is the authentic Warsaw, the way it was during communism and before the war.
    Public transport is reliable. Trams are on time, Warsaw has a small subway network, it works well.
    If you're brown, I'd avoid going into commie-block districts after dark, drunk bydlos might fuck with you and try to steal your phone or something.

    As for Slovakia, since my family lives close to the border, I've been there a few times as well. Good food. And very beautiful mountains and lakes. Excellent for hiking. Much nicer nature than Poland for sure.

    Can't say much about the Czech Republic or Hungary except for the obvious tourist spots like Prague and Lake Balaton.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      To add to this: Bialystok (at the very east of the country) is often overlooked, but I like it. It's a small town with a pretty town center and the general area has lots of Belarusian and Lithuanian influences. The Belarusians have their own minority association there and what not. And you can use the city as a base to travel further east.
      I've also been to Belarus twice. It's interesting. They left all of their Soviet symbolism everywhere: every town square, every factory has that hammer and sickle motive. Minsk itself looks pretty presentable. Outside of that it's mostly boring flatland, with one or two places of interest on the way: like a Muslim village inhabited by the descendants of Lipka Tatars. They have their own mosque, way of life and food. There are also some reconstructed castles, like Nesvizh Castle. Big and representative.
      When I went, this was before the current "situation" basically all of the tourists were Chinese.
      I felt trailed at times, since I entered on a diplomatic visa (my father was a diplomat and we just entered like that). At times there were people just standing on street corners, smoking cigarettes and observing us. Or people in restaurants shooting glances at us for no reason. Guess they thought we're spies or whatever.

      Anyway, sorry for the wall of text. If you have more questions, ask away.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Nesvizh Castle
        Nieśwież. It's a Polish castle.
        Basically everything worth seeing in Belarus was left by Poles.

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Zagreb has a few sites worth visting

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you refer to Poland or Slovakia as “Eastern Europe” the people in those countries will get bent out of shape and correct you by saying they are in “Central Europe”.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm Polish and don't give a shit about this. We were part of the Eastern Block, we're Slavs, we eat Slavic food and have Slavic customs. We're eastern.
      The butthurt of my countrymen concerning this pissess me off as well, although to be fair, in schools and on public tv we are taught that we are "central-eastern Europe", which is a bit closer to the truth.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      The people who will get really angry when you call them eastern are Czechs and Slovenes, though. Wouldn't do that there, unless you want to get in a brainless discussion about geography.

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I live here but I don't want to post about it because the last thing I want is some praise kek /misc/tard passport bro sex tourist incels turning up.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      What about a guy who wants to go kayaking and go to see sports?

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        we're full

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          I mean we are too but that doesn't stop the refugees and "refugees".

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Even for normal tourists? Im just a normalfag phoneposter anyway

          I'm half Polish and seen most of the country.
          The South is nice, the area around Krakow, Zywiec, Bielsko-Biala. Just under no circumstances go there in winter. Smog is a massive problem, and if you have respiratory problems you'll be fucked.
          Krakow is unfortunately full of annoying fucks trying to sell you tours and trinkets nowadays, 5 years ago this was not the case still, I don't know what happened honestly. But it's annoying being bothered by subhumans trying to sell you shit, even though you obviously look local.
          I'd avoid Katowice and the general area around it known as "Aglomeracja", unless you're interested in coal mining and old industry. Not worth visiting imo.
          Wroclaw is nice. Pretty town center, the outskirts are well maintained, lots of new housing being built for young families. Nice bicycle lanes if you're into that and the surrounding area also it's nice for cycling or hiking. You can visit Gora Sleza, about an hour away by car, they have some old statues/artifacts from way before, when Slavic tribes inhabited these lands and prayed to bear- and thunder gods.
          Warsaw city center is nice, but touristy. If you wanna get a taste of how real Warsovians live, go to Praga Poludnie. The architecture is horrible: old, ugly blocks. BUT bars that are frequented solely by locals, local pierogi vendors. This is the authentic Warsaw, the way it was during communism and before the war.
          Public transport is reliable. Trams are on time, Warsaw has a small subway network, it works well.
          If you're brown, I'd avoid going into commie-block districts after dark, drunk bydlos might fuck with you and try to steal your phone or something.

          As for Slovakia, since my family lives close to the border, I've been there a few times as well. Good food. And very beautiful mountains and lakes. Excellent for hiking. Much nicer nature than Poland for sure.

          Can't say much about the Czech Republic or Hungary except for the obvious tourist spots like Prague and Lake Balaton.

          Is the shit air a consequence of polish people still burning tons of wood? If yes, why they do it?

          I think I might so a south poland-slovakia tour some time

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Wood isn't a problem, the problem is that people burn coal and sometimes trash in their private ovens. Some also use really low quality coal polluted with sulfur.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Is the shit air a consequence of polish people still burning tons of wood? If yes, why they do it?
            Lots of townhouses still have their own furnaces which can be stuffed with both literal and figurative garbage like brown coal. It's a cheap option and heating was always expensive due to cold winters - and it's only gotten worse now with the whole Ukraine/Russia shitshow.
            While this is a countrywide problem, Kraków also has an unfortunate geographical placement that means it gets fuck all wind in the winter so all the smog gets to nestle in comfortably.

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    As a Hungarian: The capital is full of weirdos and homeless bums, but it's still one of the best in Europe. Not much to speak of in the countryside, unless you're into hot springs which we have a good number of. If you like good cheap food and partying then come pay us a visit, we love tourists. The historical buildings and sites are dope too. Just don't settle down here, bad idea.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Just don't settle down here, bad idea.
      Why is that?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Can you reccomend any small towns with nice hot springs?
      In budapest i loved the rudas spa but i hate cities

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >but it's still one of the best in Europe
      What are some pros?

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    If I go to prague, can I go to any other interesting cities in eastern bloc for a day trip ?

  8. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hopping on this thread

    Any tips on having a fun week with family around the Budapest area?

    Also, is booking a day in Vienna a meme move or is it actually worth it?

  9. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Serious question, how is going the "Russification" of former Soviet slavic countries?

    Is the current Russian and Ukraine diaspora having any impacts at all?

    Reason why I I'm asking is that I'm noticing a few more pure slavic (not european miscegenated) even here at the heart of Sao Paulo, Brazil (along with a ton of Japanese as well)

    Is this really the case for places like Georgia, Czech Republic, Poland, etc.. ? I wonder how they are managing?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's especially crazy in Georgia and Poland. Georgia had Russia diaspora before 2022 as well, Poland had Ukranian diaspora. So both grew insanely, cause people had some friends/family/acquaintances to go to or they just found information online in their languages on immigration procedures etc. They're also easier to get to via land compared to some other places.
      They're struggling. In Poland there's more solidarity with Ukraine vs Georgian solidarity with Russia for very obvious reasons, but even so it's also a lot of people for Poland to take in. Obviously Poland doesn't mind if they go further into the EU to seek jobs and shelter.
      South America is more of a destination for Russians because other continents wouldn't really welcome them. By doesn't really welcome them I mean Russians who had been living elsewhere for a long time are also not always happy to help Russians fleeing from this recent war (because many Russians who peaced out earlier peaced out cause they hated the Russian system and/or Putin vs recently migrating Russians who don't necessarily hate the system, they just don't want to die for Putin). They had visa issues in many places, too. South America is an easy destination for Russians. I highly doubt you hear a lot of Ukranians, unless they're Russian-born Ukranians or something. Ukranians had more places to run to. Many Ukranian women travel back and forth to Ukraine via land, working in the EU for the most part, then bringing supplies home, then back to EU.
      The men can't visit home, unless they're really old or sick.
      You hear a lot of Ukranian and Russian spoken these days in every major city around Europe. They tend to stay in cities so that they can support each other.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Is this really the case for places like Georgia, Czech Republic, Poland, etc.. ?
        Georgia is flooded with Russians fleeing the draft and the general populace hates their guts. But that's second hand account.
        Most of non-Kremlin aligned Eastern Europe, save for the unfortunate Baltics, has no Russian diaspora and no desire to ever have one. Most would prefer if Russia disappeared off the map overnight. Russians can't even get a tourist visa nowadays in Poland, Czech Rep, Slovakia or the Baltics, they have to make their way in via Western European Schengen stamp.
        What we do have a ton of though is Ukrainians. That was the case even before the war with economic migration. In my city in Poland, since the mid-10s 1 in 8 was Ukrainian. Post-2022, it's more than 1 in fucking 4. As a result, rent has almost doubled and Ukrainians took over all the low-paid labor. You can't go outside without hearing their language and we're at the stage where some TV ads run with Cyrillic subtitles.
        Even despite the complicated Polish-Ukrainian history, there's a lot of goodwill still as everyone wants to see Russia get fucked, but it's slowly getting strained and will likely pop quickly once they peace out and it turns out the refugees would rather stay with their immigrant families than go back to the ruins.

        That makes sense. So what the hell these 20 to 30 years old will be doing long term ? South America must be a destination option also because of the free public universities, but I know it is insanely hard and competitive to pass the national entrance examinations. Medical school, to give an example, has people ranging from mid-20's to 30's trying to pass in some place like University of Sao Paulo. I'm assuming it is just as hard for something like University of Warsaw in Poland for degrees in Healthcare, Law, Engineering, Finance, IT,Education etc..?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          There's a wide range of people. There's everyone from dudes who work at constructions and blast hardstyle on the weekends in parks to IT managers and medical university professors. All kinds of people left their homes.
          There was a competition amongst universities across the EU to take in eg. medical students who fled Ukraine. Due to bureaucracy it was a bit messy, but it's not as messy as going to South America.

          Note that the EU isn't the USA, many countries offer free education here. Or cheap af education. I think you see Russians there mostly. Ukranians don't really have a reason to go that far.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            [...]
            That makes sense. So what the hell these 20 to 30 years old will be doing long term ? South America must be a destination option also because of the free public universities, but I know it is insanely hard and competitive to pass the national entrance examinations. Medical school, to give an example, has people ranging from mid-20's to 30's trying to pass in some place like University of Sao Paulo. I'm assuming it is just as hard for something like University of Warsaw in Poland for degrees in Healthcare, Law, Engineering, Finance, IT,Education etc..?

            Polish anon here. The explanation for foreign students is simple: foreign examination is accepted (at least the shoddy Ukrainian examination...) and - they pay for themselves. So actually, universities turn a profit out of foreign students.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Is this really the case for places like Georgia, Czech Republic, Poland, etc.. ?
      Georgia is flooded with Russians fleeing the draft and the general populace hates their guts. But that's second hand account.
      Most of non-Kremlin aligned Eastern Europe, save for the unfortunate Baltics, has no Russian diaspora and no desire to ever have one. Most would prefer if Russia disappeared off the map overnight. Russians can't even get a tourist visa nowadays in Poland, Czech Rep, Slovakia or the Baltics, they have to make their way in via Western European Schengen stamp.
      What we do have a ton of though is Ukrainians. That was the case even before the war with economic migration. In my city in Poland, since the mid-10s 1 in 8 was Ukrainian. Post-2022, it's more than 1 in fucking 4. As a result, rent has almost doubled and Ukrainians took over all the low-paid labor. You can't go outside without hearing their language and we're at the stage where some TV ads run with Cyrillic subtitles.
      Even despite the complicated Polish-Ukrainian history, there's a lot of goodwill still as everyone wants to see Russia get fucked, but it's slowly getting strained and will likely pop quickly once they peace out and it turns out the refugees would rather stay with their immigrant families than go back to the ruins.

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