permanent travel while living on a boat?

Has anyone tried this? It seems like the perfect solution.
>buy a boat for a relatively small amount of money (usually less than a car)
>you now have a free place to stay, forever
>sail around to different countries whenever you feel like it
>take all your stuff with you
>cool lifestyle, meet other friends at the marina/harbor
>meet local women, invite them out for a boat ride
seriously, this seems like the perfect hack for SighSee

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  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I know a bunch of boomers have done this for decades, but I think it's getting cracked down on now.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Boater here. They’re starting to crack down, yeah. Not everywhere is, not every single country or place, but they’re starting to just “harass” you. If you know you know. They’ll maliciously try to get you on petty things and just waste your time and make you feel unwelcome.

      Many places aren’t like this yet. I suspect it’s a push by the WEF to make you go through proper goytracking processers like airports, and force you to spend a lot of money on hotels/airbnbs. When my boomer mentor used to sail 10 years ago, he wouldn’t even check into countries lmao. He would just roll up on his boomeryacht and anchor out. When he’s get to a marina he’d do the whole process of checking in if it was a place that checked your papers. If not, he’s just rent a slip. Kind of based. But they’re cracking down now in a lot of places and making your trip as uncomfortable as possible. Not gonna say where cuz I dont want to ruin it, but there are also a lot of places that are still based too.

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't think it costs less than a car
    You'll always have to pay docking fees
    Sailing with, and maintaining a boat takes skill and effort

    Otherwise sounds good. You need upfront investment, some passive income to cover your living costs and once you're in, you're in it for good.

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    A seaworthy boat is expensive as frick to buy and maintain. Don't even get me started on fees and living expenses.
    [-]

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      I don't think it costs less than a car
      You'll always have to pay docking fees
      Sailing with, and maintaining a boat takes skill and effort

      Otherwise sounds good. You need upfront investment, some passive income to cover your living costs and once you're in, you're in it for good.

      how much? give me some numbers.
      obviously it's not free to maintain, but it should be less than paying for hotels + airfaire.
      You don't always have to pay docking fees, you can alternate between paying for a marina vs just anchoring in a free harbor or international waters.
      Assuming you don't get a crazy expensive yacht and learn to maintain it yourself.
      The main problem I think is that you'll have a hard time meeting normal people, because it sounds sketchy as frick to say you live on a boat and sail from port to port.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >anchoring in international waters

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Why can’t he do that? Because laws don’t apply in international waters can someone roll up on a boat and kill him legally?

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Because by definition international waters are miles and miles out in the ocean and you'd need one serious anchor for waters that deep.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              there are seamounts and reefs in international waters.
              also random islands that noone cares about.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                if there's an island its not international waters, is it now?

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              Not just that but you're far more at risk for rough conditions out that far. It's one thing to endure rough weather during a passage it's another to deal with it on and off for weeks at your anchorage.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            UNCLOS and the state under which he is flagged cover that I suppose.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >it should be less than paying for hotels + airfaire
        Maybe, but you have to realize these are almost diametrically opposed scenarios. A hotel is typically all-inclusive where your only responsibility as a guest is to behave yourself reasonably and not destroy anything, while air travel is extremely fast. You pay a premium for those things. A sailboat is the polar opposite, you have to handle everything yourself. Your "free place to stay" is constantly subject to harsh marine conditions. Systems you take for granted on land, like plumbing and electricity, become a source of potential headaches. You need fresh water and unspoiled food. There's the actual seafaring systems (sails and rigging, bilge/pumps, anchor, dinghy, lights, the hull itself, navigation tools, and various marine-grade components/spares/etc).

        Sailing also is much slower than even driving. Just going from island to island in the Caribbean takes a lot of time, to say nothing of any kind of serious oceanic trips.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >A hotel is typically all-inclusive where your only responsibility as a guest is to behave yourself reasonably and not destroy anything
          That also means you're basically almost a prisoner of the hotel. You have very few rights, they can kick you out for smoking, making too much noise, having guests over, or really anything they feel like. With a boat its *your home*, do whatever you want.
          >Systems you take for granted on land, like plumbing and electricity, become a source of potential headaches
          Well that's also true on land. It's the same solution really- learn to do basic maintenance yourself, have some common sense (don't flush toilet paper or use massive amounts of electricity) and pay for a contractor to do repairs whenever something goes seriously wrong. Build that into your budget
          >You need fresh water and unspoiled food.
          Wow, I have to buy jugs of water and cans of food. So hard. (OK, slightly difficult to lug them onto the ship, but that's just good exercise. You also have the option to eat at restaurants if you're docking in third world countries, anyway)
          >Sailing also is much slower than even driving. Just going from island to island in the Caribbean takes a lot of time, to say nothing of any kind of serious oceanic trips.
          Different type of time. Driving (or flying) is stressful and annoying, you basically lose all that time and can't do anything else while you focus on driving. With a boat you just relax, set the autopilot, and enjoy the scenery. Feel free to read, fish, play games, or do whatever you want. The travel from island to island is just another part of your life.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Anon, that guy gave you a detailed and well thought out reply and you replied just like a 14yo.
            >Wow, I have to buy jugs of water and cans of food.
            Your obviously not travelling until you leave high-school so why are you even asking the adults here? You have a good question, I'm interested in the replies, stop behaving like a little b***h

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Wow, I have to buy jugs of water and cans of food. So hard.
            Listen homosexual, you are giving of severe clueless vibes and I'm pointing out things you obviously haven't even thought about. A big reason boats are often available to purchase for seemingly cheap is that so many people buy them only to discover the lifestyle is not for them and then wind up selling at quite a loss in order to move on with their life.
            >Well that's also true on land.
            No, it's not the same. If the toilet in your house has a problem, which almost never happens, you call the plumber and they come fix it. If you're at sea and your toilet gets backed up and starts spewing shit, which it's far more likely to do because it's a tiny compact and complex system, you have to deal with it on your own.
            For electricity you need a generator.
            >Different type of time. Driving (or flying) is stressful and annoying, you basically lose all that time and can't do anything else while you focus on driving. With a boat you just relax, set the autopilot, and enjoy the scenery.
            Yeah the question is whether that's the life you want. Sailing isn't like booking a sleeper room on a train. You actually have to enjoy the sailing part. Some people love it more than anything, but it's not for everyone.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              Not op. I sailed from Panama to Colombia some years ago and it was miserable. I remember the captain kept a fighting wiener on board and I was so sea sick, my face was lying it the chicken shit and I was burning in the sun but I didn't have the energy to move. Felt 'land sick' for about 4 days after.
              Having said that, the romantic appeal still lingers, is my experience something that many people start out with and overcome? I have the finances and freedom to sail for the rest of my life now but I'm also a little afraid of going insane while being alone at sea for a month. What's your experience?

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                You were kidnapped by some guna ?

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >What's your experience?
                I sailed with my grandfather as a kid, never any major voyages but a couple of sleepovers. But my aunts and uncles did, and they were split right down the middle on whether they actually enjoyed it or not. Half of them loved it and would tell good stories the other half hated it and would tell bad stories.
                These days I have a sunfish for summer weekends otherwise just watch sailing videos on youtube occasionally.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >anchoring in international waters
        Anon, you can’t just drop anchor in the middle of the Atlantic on your 37’ Catalina

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          of course not, but you can anchor 25 miles off the coast wherever its shallow.
          Or just pull up in some random cove where noone is looking

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Go look at some nautical charts and you’ll realize why anchorages exist and people just don’t throw the anchor down in the middle of the sea. Your typical consumer yacht isn’t even going to carry enough line to anchor in the depths typical of 25 miles offshore.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              Yes i know. Im not saying you can just drop anxhor wherever you feel like it, just listing that as one possible option if you can find a safe spot. These people: https://www.quora.com/When-sailing-to-another-country-can-you-drop-anchor-along-the-coast-line-and-stay-there-or-do-you-have-to-use-designated-marinas have done it.
              Realistically i would cycle between paid marinas, semi-legal coastal spits, and offshore. Tge point is that marina fees dont have to be a massive expense. Even if you did live always at marinas, its way cheaper than a hotel.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >25 miles off the coast wherever its shallow.
            Is possible on the North Sea, wouldn't do it though.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >25 miles off the coast wherever its shallow.
            Seriously and speaking as your SighSee friend, if you dont realize why that is ridiculous, step one to doing what you propose would be to learn even the slightest thing qbout boats and sailing. If you do that, and are willing to either live frugally or have lits of money, it can be done. It is a great lifestyle for those who enjoy it. But yiu have to have more of a realistic view of what youre in for.

            tl,dr‐- First learn to boat.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >The main problem I think is that you'll have a hard time meeting normal people, because it sounds sketchy as frick to say you live on a boat and sail from port to port.
        You'll meet other yachties (boomers). It is a bit of a community. You see other vessels sailing towards the same destinations when you anchor in e.g. a Caribbean Bay and there are 200 sailing yachts anchored there as well you can just check if there are any fellow countrymen and go say hello in your tender boat. The closest thing this resembles (to me obviously) is going on a well travelled trek and you see people on the hike and then you also see them at camp. Lots of couples (quite a number break up during their first ocean crossing), lots of old people, quite some single men. Not many single women though if that's what you're after.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        For actual living onboard and traveling with some comfort? (you don't want to vegetate in a shoe box with zero amenities right) I would say 60-100k for a used boat + 20-30k for renovations, additional equipment and quality of life upgrades and running costs of about 15k/year to keep it seaworthy.
        There's always something wrong with your boat. A new set of sails, that be 3k, engine revision 2k, antifouling paint 2k, new lines 600 ...
        Also you won't have a multiday trip without having to replace or jury rig something and Marinas are like airports, you pay for everything out of your ass if you need it and you will pay for it because you need it.
        Don't get me started on provisions, it's not that easy to store water, food, gas, garbage and gasoline for a 7day trip then there are a lot of restrictions what you can and can't bring like pretty much your entire cheap food stock you bought in Papua will be confiscated by customs as soon as you reach Australia etc pp

        It's possible but "living on a boat" is something for trust fund kids and retirees with a good pension and a passion for sailing. You either have your solid 5k+/month passive income with a reserve that won't evaporate if you have to take out a small amount like 30k at once to pay you way out of shit. Else you look at a hobo tier experience where you might get stuck for 2-3 months god knows where to save up money to fix your plumbing, replace your stove or get a new rudder delivered.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          thanks for the numbers. Is that from your own experiences, or just stuff you researched? your numbers seem quite a bit higher than what I've seen.
          For example this:https://houston.craigslist.org/boa/d/kemah-pearson-10m-1977-price-drop/7704812775.html
          still needs some fixing but it's only 13k and intended for long-term cruising/living.

          Also i was always intending to live in cheap foreign countries, not overpriced US marinas.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          thanks for the numbers. Is that from your own experiences, or just stuff you researched? your numbers seem quite a bit higher than what I've seen.
          For example this:https://houston.craigslist.org/boa/d/kemah-pearson-10m-1977-price-drop/7704812775.html
          still needs some fixing but it's only 13k and intended for long-term cruising/living.

          Also i was always intending to live in cheap foreign countries, not overpriced US marinas.

          Hey OP, that anon is brazenly lying. Maybe he’s a fed trying to dissuade you. You can buy a seaworthy old vessel in great shape for 3-4k. It will be small (25ft or so) but you can cross oceans on it, it’s been done. If you want a bigger boat, that’s what will run uo your expense into 5 digit territory. 30 ft will cost you 10k. 40 ft will cost you 20k. You might have to fix some things, which if you do yourself will just cost you the raw materials and the price of the tools if you cant borrow any. I had to repaint my boat which cost me a few hundred bucks. It would have been more expensive to get the boat out of the water to paint, but my friend owned the yard that sold me the boat and so I just did it there for free lol. Took me a week

          I’m an avid sailer and bought and sold several boats over the years. You might want to start at a 30 ft boat if it fits your budget. You can jump right into cruising, it’s really easy. Make sure you are competent at sailing though. You’ll make a lot of friends which makes stuff cheaper to fix or easier to find.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Have you ever crossed the Atlantic or Pacific in a <30 foot boat?

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            what if my budget is $100-120k? what's a good boat? also do you have strong opinions about monohulls vs catamarans? also interested in motor yachts but I know they have limitations. Im pretty handy and have a background in engineering.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              Not the guy who you were talking to, but I'm an experienced sailor so I'll give my 2 cents. You want to get a used boat in the best condition possible within your budget, regardless of type or brand. When you find a boat you like, read up on common problems and look for/ask about those problems when you go to view the boat. Get a professional survey of the boat before you buy. Surveys are expensive but well worth the money.

              If you will be crossing oceans, you will want a so-called bluewater boat. These will be able to stand up to weather, but perhaps more importantly will have enough water and diesel tankage and storage room for provisions. Bigger boats will be more comfortable at sea generally. Over 40ft long will be difficult to singlehand. I'd recommend >30ft but people can and do cross oceans in 25ft boats. Bigger boat=more expensive.

              Monohulls will be cheaper to buy and maintain. Catamarans have bigger accommodation. Monohulls sail better upwind but you can just motor upwind so that's not a huge deal if you are not a purist IMO

              Both those anons are correct. Owning a boat is expensive, but the more you are willing to do yourself, the cheaper it will be. An initial $120k budget is definitely doable but you will need some long-run income to survive. Good luck!

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Maybe your friend's boat was too smoll
                Yes, this was exactly the problem. It was perfectly cozy for day trips, overnights, or even a long weekend, it was just too small to be the real home he was trying to use it for. No onboard storage, the bathroom was essentially a PortaPotty with a glorified camp shower built into it, the galley a camp stove and dorm fridge built into a small closet.

                I have no doubt that there are many comfortable liveaboard boats, but I haven’t seen one that would support a full-time lifestyle I would find comfortable that didn’t cost, at the very least, several times as much as a car (as OP suggested many might be cheaper).

                But I have no detailed info, only mild curiosity rather than real interest, and literally zero experience. The posters throwing numbers around above could be right; maybe there is a beautiful cheap boat somewhere for OP to move into. Seems like more trouble than I would enjoy, though. On the rare occasions that I have spent more than an afternoon at sea (twice in my life so far), I have chartered boats I probably couldn’t afford to buy that were owned and piloted by other people.

                Thanks, these are good tips. Yeah I'm thinking that like 35-40 feet is the sweet spot. Small enough that I could handle it myself, but big enough that I can actually live in it without going insane. I don't mind working on it myself, but there's a lot of stuff I don't know how to do and I don't want to be stuck at sea trying to figure out how the hell to repair an engine.

                Thinking now I'll look for ways to volunteer as crew on someone else's ship for a while.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            He wants to live in his boat and keep on "going" so his belongings etc are either in a storage or on the boat. The room is so limited and that class won't provide it unless it is for a dick waving trip.
            Yeah you can cross the Atlantic in a 25-30ft boat that is okay. It's a one off fun adventure(Anon did that twice) that is neither comfortable nor actually enjoyable as it's hard work. After the roughly 25 days even a fricking hostel dorm bed with a messed up bath will feel like paradise.
            The 25-30ft class is what you use for weekend coast hugging or Caribbean cruising where you do one day hops from port to port and sleep in a Hotel. You can sleep in it if you have to (to extend range, get trough bad weather or use it as a ultra cheap hostel bed) but that's not what it's made for an you will realize that after your first 3 nights onboard.

            Living starts on a 35ft boat and with a 45ft one you can actually get something that is self sustaining as you can get some privacy house paying guests and make some decent money from it if you know what you do.

            Trading in 10-20k for a floating homeless shelter is bullshit if you want to sail the seas.
            You want a toilet, a shower, a actual bed, enough fresh water, a functional galley with enough storage room (fridges and freezers) and some kind of office.

            t. sailed Basel to Sydney and the other way around back on a 45ft boat with a friend.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              >Basel to Sydney
              Switzerland is landlocked, who are you trying to fool here?

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Are you moronic or just american?

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >get on the Rhine river
                >sail the river through Switzerland and onto France
                >keep going until you make it to sea
                >continue onwards to sydney
                Wow, its literally possible

                https://i.imgur.com/GIc1pG3.jpg

                [...]
                This. Basel is a major international shipping port, despite being ~300mi/~480km from the nearest seaside . When I relocated here from the US most of my furniture was shipped by sea in a container. Pic related.

                >inland water ways
                >ocean sailing vessel
                Have fun passing under all those bridges, oh wait you won't because you made up this story about going from Basel to Sydney with a sailing boat. You don't want to cross the ocean with a foldable mast and nobody's got time to wait for all bridges to open (protip: some are fixed and can't open).

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >foldable mast
                it's not a foldable mast, you literally remove the mast and tie it up on board, you motor your way down the river. Once you get to the ocean you pop the mast back in. Thousands of boats do this in France, sailing from the English Channel down to the Mediterranean through rivers.

                https://www.worldcruising.com/arc/arc_2023_evententries.aspx
                OP, here's a list of boats that sailed cross-Atlantic, from the Canaries to the Caribbean, last year. LOA is length overall, in meters. Plenty of boats in the 11 meter range (36 feet). It won't be comfy, but it can be done.

                And you can automate tons of things on a boat today, from rig handling to steering (it will be more expensive though). I met this guy who sailed from Panama across the Pacific to Australia all on his own. It wasn't fun, he said, but absolutely doable.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                OP here.
                >It wasn't fun, he said, but absolutely doable.
                What does this mean though.
                Humans do all sorts of crazy things. Some people swim across the English channel.
                Is it something that a regular person could do, regularly, as part of their life? Like, one island hop across the Caribbean every few months, and one trip across the Atlantic every year or two?

                It looks like most of the boats on that list are at *least* 12 meters long (40 feet), so maybe 40-50 is a good length to shoot for. Especially if it comes with automation stuff to make handling it easier. I don't know what that would cost though.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >>It wasn't fun, he said, but absolutely doable.
                >What does this mean though.
                He said it was absolutely boring, he just got sick of being all alone for more than a month. Said at times it was so rough that you couldn't do anything, like read or whatever. Just sit and wait for bad weather to pass.

                >It looks like most of the boats on that list are at *least* 12 meters long (40 feet),
                Yeah, but that's because boats have been getting bigger and bigger through the years. Doesn't mean you can't do it with less. Try to find records of crossings from 20 or 30 years ago, or even further back. The boats will be much smaller. Remember that price increases exponentially with the size of the boat, not linearly.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Try to use a hydrovane for steering automation since that gives not so much noise and doesn't cost electricity.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Is it something that a regular person could do, regularly, as part of their life? Like, one island hop across the Caribbean every few months, and one trip across the Atlantic every year or two?
                Sam Holmes Sailing. just youtube him. he sails around on pretty long voyages at a time. hes done pacific and Atlantic crossings too. its not hard.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                I liked watching Delos and La Vagabonde a while back but have fallen off watching both of them lately. seems like a very comfy lifestyle if you can afford it and can maintain a boat. although maybe that’s changing these days with geopolitical instability rising all over the place.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >get on the Rhine river
                >sail the river through Switzerland and onto France
                >keep going until you make it to sea
                >continue onwards to sydney
                Wow, its literally possible

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                You need a RIVERboat to sail on rivers, moron.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >sail on rivers
                moron

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                It is allowed, but isn't necessarily comfy.
                >moron

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >get on the Rhine river
                >sail the river through Switzerland and onto France
                >keep going until you make it to sea
                >continue onwards to sydney
                Wow, its literally possible

                This. Basel is a major international shipping port, despite being ~300mi/~480km from the nearest seaside . When I relocated here from the US most of my furniture was shipped by sea in a container. Pic related.

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    OP people are giving you good advice and you are being a colossal moron. Perhaps your skin
    is the color of shit or maybe you arent ready

    I live in NZ so this topic of conversation comes up from time to time. Yes, it is possible but its not easy. You are replacing rental for docking fees. McGivering things are harder than living in a van. Water and showers are an issue. But the worst thing is sleeping. Some bodies are simply not cut up for sleeping in the open sea

    Join a yatch club, learn some basic things, hopefully make some friends with good boats and then decide if you want to take the plunge

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      OP here. The reason I'm not being nice is that most of the "advice" was not helpful, it's just very obvious complaints from people that have never tried this before. "you'll still have expenses" and "boats can be dangerous" is stuff that everyone already knows. I'm not trying to pretend like i'm some seasons boat captain, and I would obviously do more training before I sail off to international waters. Most problems can be solved with time and effort, it's just a question of whether it's worth my time solving them.

      I have not tried, nor wanted to try, this, but I do know someone who lived on a sailboat he owned, in a paid marina, for about a year in the Bay Area of California while he was trying to avoid insane local rent. He described it as cool at first, but it was a really small, somewhat rudimentary living space, something between a rented room and a homeless person’s campsite in practice—galley and bathroom were both especially approximate/not quite sufficient for full-time life. Girls he picked up would be impressed only until they saw it.

      Conditions would be at least slightly better on a larger yacht, obviously, but it’s still more cramped than you might expect, and bigger boats rapidly become expensive in themselves, along with requiring greater expense to run, moor, and maintain. And no boat seaworthy enough for transoceanic travel is likely to be cheap or easy to sail without a crew, so any cost-effective version of this lifestyle is probably only realistic in a limited geographic area.

      This is obviously a thing that people do. But I don’t think it’s very cheap or easy.

      Yeah I've seen a lot of people in my city living like that. They seem like borderline homeless, and I wouldn't want to live like them. I don't think their boats are even seaworthy. That said, it's a decent hack to avoid insane rent. I think it would be better to pay for a nice boat and live in a cheap foreign country.

      >The main problem I think is that you'll have a hard time meeting normal people, because it sounds sketchy as frick to say you live on a boat and sail from port to port.
      You'll meet other yachties (boomers). It is a bit of a community. You see other vessels sailing towards the same destinations when you anchor in e.g. a Caribbean Bay and there are 200 sailing yachts anchored there as well you can just check if there are any fellow countrymen and go say hello in your tender boat. The closest thing this resembles (to me obviously) is going on a well travelled trek and you see people on the hike and then you also see them at camp. Lots of couples (quite a number break up during their first ocean crossing), lots of old people, quite some single men. Not many single women though if that's what you're after.

      That's what i'm worried about. I'll just meet a bunch of boomers and single men, no women or long-term friends. But at least it proves that their is a community of people doing this long-term. It's not some crazy project that noone has ever done before.

      >What's your experience?
      I sailed with my grandfather as a kid, never any major voyages but a couple of sleepovers. But my aunts and uncles did, and they were split right down the middle on whether they actually enjoyed it or not. Half of them loved it and would tell good stories the other half hated it and would tell bad stories.
      These days I have a sunfish for summer weekends otherwise just watch sailing videos on youtube occasionally.

      Was it the aunts who hated it and the uncles who loved it? or was it more split?
      I was thinking it would depend a lot on whether you have a nice enough boat. I can afford to spend up to $50k, which should be enough to buy a 50-foot boat and get it in good shape. I would think that would solve a lot of comfort issues. Plus pay for training and more complicated maintenance.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >. Most problems can be solved with time and effort, it's just a question of whether it's worth my time solving them.
        It's not if you're still here unable to decide.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Was it the aunts who hated it and the uncles who loved it? or was it more split?
        Only one Aunt went but she was the most enthusiastic of all (while her husband was the most critical-- though had a great sense of humor about it). The other uncles (4 of them) were more moderate opinions and evenly split.
        >. The reason I'm not being nice
        If you want better replies, do more research on your own and bring something interesting to the discussion yourself besides than clueless comments like "you now have a free place to stay, forever." Don't ask for some random anon to break down every fricking expense you might have, you should do that legwork yourself and then come here to talk about more interesting and specific decisions you might need to make along the way.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          We get it, your jaded.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Not at all. Funny you would think that.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        > Yeah I've seen a lot of people in my city living like that. They seem like borderline homeless, and I wouldn't want to live like them. I don't think their boats are even seaworthy. That said, it's a decent hack to avoid insane rent.
        My friend’s situation wasn’t quite so grim, and his boat was in good shape (he did a fair amount of sailing to various points up and down the California coast in it, and he took me and other friends out on the Bay all the time), it was just too small to be a fully functional, comfortable long-term residence. I also don’t think it would have been capable of long/international trips, although he probably could have done inter-island hops somewhere like the Caribbean had he been based there instead of the Pacific.) He saved many thousands over the course of that year, though.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Maybe your friend's boat was too smoll

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Maybe your friend's boat was too smoll
            Yes, this was exactly the problem. It was perfectly cozy for day trips, overnights, or even a long weekend, it was just too small to be the real home he was trying to use it for. No onboard storage, the bathroom was essentially a PortaPotty with a glorified camp shower built into it, the galley a camp stove and dorm fridge built into a small closet.

            I have no doubt that there are many comfortable liveaboard boats, but I haven’t seen one that would support a full-time lifestyle I would find comfortable that didn’t cost, at the very least, several times as much as a car (as OP suggested many might be cheaper).

            But I have no detailed info, only mild curiosity rather than real interest, and literally zero experience. The posters throwing numbers around above could be right; maybe there is a beautiful cheap boat somewhere for OP to move into. Seems like more trouble than I would enjoy, though. On the rare occasions that I have spent more than an afternoon at sea (twice in my life so far), I have chartered boats I probably couldn’t afford to buy that were owned and piloted by other people.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Yeah I've seen a lot of people in my city living like that. They seem like borderline homeless, and I wouldn't want to live like them. I don't think their boats are even seaworthy. That said, it's a decent hack to avoid insane rent.
        A lot of those people are actual pedos who can't get an apartment or rent anywhere because what they did comes up.

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have not tried, nor wanted to try, this, but I do know someone who lived on a sailboat he owned, in a paid marina, for about a year in the Bay Area of California while he was trying to avoid insane local rent. He described it as cool at first, but it was a really small, somewhat rudimentary living space, something between a rented room and a homeless person’s campsite in practice—galley and bathroom were both especially approximate/not quite sufficient for full-time life. Girls he picked up would be impressed only until they saw it.

    Conditions would be at least slightly better on a larger yacht, obviously, but it’s still more cramped than you might expect, and bigger boats rapidly become expensive in themselves, along with requiring greater expense to run, moor, and maintain. And no boat seaworthy enough for transoceanic travel is likely to be cheap or easy to sail without a crew, so any cost-effective version of this lifestyle is probably only realistic in a limited geographic area.

    This is obviously a thing that people do. But I don’t think it’s very cheap or easy.

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >you now have a free place to stay, forever
    Maintenance and harbour fees aren't free. Nor is fuel (sailing boats need it in port and for electricity/charge the battery).

    My mother did this for a couple of years though. It's quite nice. Although my step dad is really good at fixing things on the boat and navigating. So you need to be able to do that first.

    I would start by renting a boat for a week, then getting a simple sailing yacht to sail in the weekends, then if you're sure you really want to do this: get a very seaworthy boat and renovate it yourself over winter before you set sail to new horizons.

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Some docking prices near me.
    https://www.ci.marathon.fl.us/marinaandports/page/pricing
    Plenty of places to park off shore over night.
    Some people I know live like this and just shuttle in take a shower & go work a normal job.
    Then go recharge batteries/ flush. tank every so often. Alot of people will rent out private canal docks. Also there are so many empty weekly rentals real estate company's would rather rent out a dock for a fraction of the price then not make anything at all. Just have a back up plan & boat insurance for hurricane season.

    You can see plenty of 1/2 sunken boats around Key West.

  8. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >you now have a free place to stay, forever
    Tell me you have never sailed without telling me you have never sailed.
    Harbor fees will tear you a new one.

  9. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Arr matey you might want to invest in a proper peg leg and swashbuckler if ye gonna be sea faring and living salty dog, ye dont want to be caught off guard by the sea law dogs, while ye be pillaging fine maiden booty with ye crew, ha har!

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >pillaging fine maiden booty
      He's on SighSee.
      >with ye crew,
      He's on SighSee.

  10. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >(usually less than a car)
    Until you have to pay for maintenance

  11. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Wow! No one has ever thought of this before! Genius idea, OP!!!

    95% people quit when they realize how much of a pain in the ass the non-stop maintenance of a sailboat takes. There are ALWAYS projects to do—much of them will leave you pulling your hair out. The costs can add-up. Tack on the constant anxieties that are inherent to actually sailing or simply just being anchored in one spot and much of the cruising larpers immediately get filtered.

    The costs can add-up. You’ll save a lot of money if you can DIY and are sort of a jack-of-all trades kind of guy when it comes to electrical work, diesel maintenance, wood work, upholstery, etc.

    So many tech soiboys tried to take up the digital nomad cruising lifestyle in my area the past few years and they’re just about the all the sellers trying to get rid of their sailboats right now when they realized they couldn’t handle it. They’re the laughing stock of my yacht club.

    t. Boat owner and been sailing for 15 years

  12. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    How much does it cost to just travel the world on economy only. Like spend a month somewhere then get on a plane and go someplace else. I'm not planning on staying in super expensive hotels, just not a hostel where I need to share a bathroom or something.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Costs vary tremendously based on your choices. Do you have to eat at the fancy tourist places, or do plastic chairs and oscillating fans suit you fine? Could be the difference between $30/day spent on food and $8/day. Is next month's destination a $60 flight away, or a $600 flight away? Do you have to stay on the beach? Beaches are the biggest tourist racket there is.

  13. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Things to consider:

    - Boats that wont sink on the slightest weather change are expensive and cost a lot to maintain.

    - You need ACTUAL good navigation skills to do what you want to do, the ocean does not forgive rookies.

    - Isolation will take a toll on you sooner or later so you need to be mentally tough for that lifestyle. Everyone you meet will see you as a tourist attraction and nothing more, making real lasting friendships will be a luxury. The same goes with meeting women.

    Friend of mine sold all his assets and did it with $500,000 USD in savings, he lives comfortably well but that money drains quickly when you have no income streams. He has an online business and generates income that way. He saved a lot of money on food by sailing closer to the shore and fishing when he could, then he'd make a BBQ on his boat and that would be his dinner along with some fruits.

    On average you need around $200,000-$250,000 to buy a seaworthy vessel in 2024 that is in good shape and you need anywhere between 8 and 10% of the total cost per year to maintain it so between 20-25k a year in maintenance fees.

    Then you got docking fees, fuel, and other necessities.

    Then you got food, medications, survival products you need on the boat that need to be replenished.

    Then you need a budget set aside for repairs in case you hit a storm or an accident happens when the boat is docked (Another boat hits it for example).

    So you can't just sail around the world indefinitely unless you're rich, you need ways to make money.

  14. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bust
    Out
    Another
    Thousand

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Boat owners know.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      also boats float because you throw money in the ocean to keep it from sinking, not because of bouyancy

  15. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >buy a seaworthy boat with living quarters for less than a car
    Lolololol

  16. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    the technology is here, dont mind the XV century sail boomer

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >6 meter waves block your path
      >heh, nothing personell form stable vessel

    • 4 months ago
      Cult of Passion

      Oooh, swampboat house, frick the police, use bitcoin.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        whats the simplest floating house possible? i dont need toilet or kitchen

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Shotgun house with like treated 2x10's or wtv on plastic barrels as the base. You can have a "double barrel" house so its not so thin instead of 8 feet wide you can do to 12-16feet. This also has a half floor bedroom. Shotgun houses are comfy if you dig crackdens.

  17. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    to the sailing anons itt:
    is this kind of thing only doable on a sailing yacht?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Depends on where you want to go obviously, but crossing a sea in a motor yacht is usually not so comfy due to the rolling. Unless you have a giant ship but then you'd have to be very wealthy.

  18. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Go rent an airbnb boat for a weekend and then report back.

  19. 4 months ago
    Cult of Passion

    >usually less than a car
    Utterly delusional.
    >free place to stay
    Utterly delusional.
    >whenever you feel like it
    Your path is linear and set practically from the onset or at checkpoints.
    >take all your stuff with you
    Not with a "car-boat".
    >cool lifestyle, meet other friends at the marina/harbor
    Fair enough.
    >meet local women, invite them out for a boat ride
    Rape have no place in society.

  20. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >usually less than a car
    moron detected
    >www.google.com
    aaaaaaaand /thread

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