plus one

flying into ireland on the 19th, exploring dublin for the day then going to a wedding in dublin on the 20th, then we have three nights before we fly out. i'm thinking of driving to galway for one night then cork for another, and then possibly doing another city back towards dublin for our last night, then flying home the next day. any recs on the third city? or maybe stay in galway/cork for two nights? how about an ireland general?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My i have distant cousins in Dingle and Cahersiveen. Give them money plz

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Try and fit Belfast in, one of the better cities in Ireland, definitely better than Cork and Dublin

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pick one city or the other. Cork is just mini Dublin and not worth driving all the way from Galway. I'd advise two nights in Galway. On one day do a trip to either the Cliffs of Moher/the Burren, or a trip to the Aran Islands which are Irish speaking fishing villages with Neolithic ruins, or a trip to Connemara and you can see the lovely countryside where John Wayne beat up Maureen O'Hara in the Quiet Man. The best parts of Ireland are in the countryside. You could also take the train, you wouldnt need to rent a car. Killarney would also be better than Cork because you would have easy access to the Ring of Kerry and Dingle, either on a bus tour or by driving and the town itself is nice. If you must do Cork for whatever reason, do one of those bus tours that take you to the Rock of Cashel along the way and will bring you back to Dublin by nightfall. Honestly if you've only got a few days you could just have a base in Dublin and do day trips from there and youd be far less stretched thin. Wicklow/Glendalough, Howth, Kilkenny, all are worth visiting and easy to get to from Dublin.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Galway -> Cork
      That's a long ass journey. As said stick to Galway and its surrounds, Cork is a kip.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >another city
    you've got a car, in ireland
    how many "cities" do you need!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Spent 3 months travelling in Ireland and after literally 20 minutes in Galway I took a train to leave.
      Shit's a big tourist trap and I don't get why anyone would drive hours to go there.
      As said, don't go in a big city, that's the least interesting thing to do in the country, there are hundreds of kilometers of epic coasts if that's your thing and 99.9% of them don't have chink bus tours and plastic memorabilia in fake shops nearby.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I have been in Ireland for a little under a week, and I just want to say how fricking gay it is.
        The entire country just feels so commercialised, as though they're trying to profit from their culture and identity to delusional tourists, who think that the Irishman plays the fiddle and dances to the tune of ‘Whiskey in the Jar’ or ‘The Foggy Dew’ at the slightest provocation.
        In soothe, it’s the exact opposite. Barely anyone seems happy or content, a lot of the roads are urbanised, and the towns just feel congested with way too many people.
        That’s not to mention the people themselves. They drive like fricking spastics, who can’t understand how vehicle control works, and even in public they aren’t amiable, instead preferring to glare/stare at anyone outside of the 10 person clique they’re apart of. It’s rare to derive any form of joy, or sociability from them. Any stereotype you know about the Irish being bubbly and cheery is embellished and likely only applies to tourist venues, meant to propagate a contrived misconception of the Irishman’s way of life. I will say however, that the staff at cafes and venues, who are paid to be nice to me are incredibly affable, but again, they are paid to be hospitable.
        I’ve also come to the idea that the Irish culture is destined to be continually bumraped by foreigners and tourists alike, who come to buy jackets with the Guiness logo imprinted on them, fridge magnets and little Irish flags, and who demand that ol Paddy hope up and down for a quarter, so some corpulent Yank can get his little stint of cultural satisfaction.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          take a chill pill, dude

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/KnrPPb3.png

          Now I’m from Australia, and while we play up the tourism a bit, in regards to didgeridoo’s, kangaroo’s, the Opera House, slang, ect, it’s nowhere near to this level. Almost every store is filled with shirts, pens, globes, Christmas ornaments, ANYTHING that has ‘IRELAND’ imprinted on them, in large bold letters at overpriced values, while drab storeclerks wait behind a counter, with dregs of joy crumbling afore your gaze as the hours slowly drip by. This is a culturally bankrupt and floundering country, torn apart by the flailing serpent of greed, deluding the Irish into fleecing the naïve, foreign masses in exchange for their dignity.
          To provide an analogy to hammer home the point, think of a naked Irishman, confined to a stockade, with a sign above him saying, “10 dollars for a ride”. Then there’s a long line of tourists, all waiting for the chance to communally indulge themselves in the exotic pleasure of assraping this hapless, ignoble Irishman, before trundling off back to wherever they came from, to boast to their friends about how they’ve been ‘in’ the Erin’s Isle. In essence, Ireland is like a cheap prostitute, fricked, photographed and demeaned for a few bob.
          And don’t get me started on the complete farce that is patriotism in this country. I absolutely adore how every street sign or direction on an overpass has Gaelic first, and then English below it. Not only does it make travel so FRICKING ENRICHING, having me struggle at maintaining 120KM speed, while ascertaining where the frick I am, but it implies that the country itself genuinely cares about retaining the Irish culture and dialect (Which only 2 percent of the Irish speak natively), omitting the fact that they simultaneously import hundreds of thousands of immigrants into the country each year, inevitably eroding their way of life and values.

          https://i.imgur.com/2NRnDKI.png

          Essentially, I’ve come to realise that Irish patriotism is a thin veneer, that when stripped away reveals a blackened, migrant filled remnant of its former glory. An idea that culture is only dialect, instead of race. Oh how their forefathers must grieve and writhe in irate wracked frustration at the struggles which happened for nowt.

          And that’s omitting the Irish themselves. I have been to approximately 20 – 40 towns and villages of varying sizes, and from what I can discern it is a rarity to find an attractive Irishman. Many of them are overweight, bearing pudgy countenances and shambling gaits, on spindly legs that can barely support their overbearing, hulking frames. And the privileged few who actually are genuinely attractive, likely being descended from Viking, Anglo or Scottish settlers, constitute about five to ten percent of the population. A paltry sum for a white nation, where over half of the youth should be conventionally attractive.
          The unfortunate truth about the Irish phenotype is doubly apparent, when considering that I’ve just came from Finland, the whitest and blondest nation I have ever graced my eyes upon. While I’m aware that many deluded and gullible poofs believe that the Finnish phenotype is Asiatic and Mongolian in nature, it is in fact the opposite. The vast majority of native Finns are objectively beautiful, especially when placed in contrast to the many ghastly abominations that reside in the Irish bogs and towns, existing for no other conceivable purpose than to traumatise tourists and ward off rapists from even stumbling upon the mere notion of laying with such fickle beasts.

          https://i.imgur.com/cZG1Bsu.png

          Beowulf killed Grendel, who I have come to believe was and is an Irishman, and for good fricking reason.
          And in spite of all of this you can’t even get a moment of solace away from it all. Everywhere is filled with these people, clamouring together, driving, constantly walking. There’s no peace and quiet, no serenity. It’s constant hustle and bustle. And they aren’t even funny Leprechaun midgets who talk a lot, they just walk aimlessly, barely talking, being bereft of any joy or humanity, like bleak, vapid, banal automatons. I’ve been travelling to the most backwater, regional areas, and even away from broader civilisation, surrounded by paddocks and wildlife, it’s still filled with cars, or towns of 2000 people absolutely chocka block full.
          There’s a reason why so many Irishmen emigrated away from this gaudy land, it’s because the prospect of the New World is a land of bliss to these people. They would rather stave off crocodiles and live in a desert, than trek through another bog ridden wasteland, while having a Yank throw quarters at them for a photo.

          There are positives though. The Churches are quite lovely, the nature is nice, if diminished by the creeping sensation of modernisation and I do appreciate the quaint little shops. To clarify, I have been avoiding major cities, such as Dublin, to attempt to get a genuine country feel, albeit to no avail, as every area seems to be a major tourist attraction.

          Overall, Gerald of Wales was right.

          [...]

          Would love your dissertation.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Draw a straight line from Dublin to the West Coast.
    Start there and go go down staying at different places along the way until you maybe get to Kerry. But go slow.
    Don't bother going to Cork.
    Drive back to Dublin and go home through the middle

    Otherwise you are missing too much. Get the idea of more cities mean better trip out of your mind. It's lame

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Galway plus countryside is all you need. Could take the train from Dublin and see the countryside that way. Or get a car and see the cliffs of Moher.
    Do not go to Cork. Good luck!

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Now I’m from Australia, and while we play up the tourism a bit, in regards to didgeridoo’s, kangaroo’s, the Opera House, slang, ect, it’s nowhere near to this level. Almost every store is filled with shirts, pens, globes, Christmas ornaments, ANYTHING that has ‘IRELAND’ imprinted on them, in large bold letters at overpriced values, while drab storeclerks wait behind a counter, with dregs of joy crumbling afore your gaze as the hours slowly drip by. This is a culturally bankrupt and floundering country, torn apart by the flailing serpent of greed, deluding the Irish into fleecing the naïve, foreign masses in exchange for their dignity.
    To provide an analogy to hammer home the point, think of a naked Irishman, confined to a stockade, with a sign above him saying, “10 dollars for a ride”. Then there’s a long line of tourists, all waiting for the chance to communally indulge themselves in the exotic pleasure of assraping this hapless, ignoble Irishman, before trundling off back to wherever they came from, to boast to their friends about how they’ve been ‘in’ the Erin’s Isle. In essence, Ireland is like a cheap prostitute, fricked, photographed and demeaned for a few bob.
    And don’t get me started on the complete farce that is patriotism in this country. I absolutely adore how every street sign or direction on an overpass has Gaelic first, and then English below it. Not only does it make travel so FRICKING ENRICHING, having me struggle at maintaining 120KM speed, while ascertaining where the frick I am, but it implies that the country itself genuinely cares about retaining the Irish culture and dialect (Which only 2 percent of the Irish speak natively), omitting the fact that they simultaneously import hundreds of thousands of immigrants into the country each year, inevitably eroding their way of life and values.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Essentially, I’ve come to realise that Irish patriotism is a thin veneer, that when stripped away reveals a blackened, migrant filled remnant of its former glory. An idea that culture is only dialect, instead of race. Oh how their forefathers must grieve and writhe in irate wracked frustration at the struggles which happened for nowt.

    And that’s omitting the Irish themselves. I have been to approximately 20 – 40 towns and villages of varying sizes, and from what I can discern it is a rarity to find an attractive Irishman. Many of them are overweight, bearing pudgy countenances and shambling gaits, on spindly legs that can barely support their overbearing, hulking frames. And the privileged few who actually are genuinely attractive, likely being descended from Viking, Anglo or Scottish settlers, constitute about five to ten percent of the population. A paltry sum for a white nation, where over half of the youth should be conventionally attractive.
    The unfortunate truth about the Irish phenotype is doubly apparent, when considering that I’ve just came from Finland, the whitest and blondest nation I have ever graced my eyes upon. While I’m aware that many deluded and gullible poofs believe that the Finnish phenotype is Asiatic and Mongolian in nature, it is in fact the opposite. The vast majority of native Finns are objectively beautiful, especially when placed in contrast to the many ghastly abominations that reside in the Irish bogs and towns, existing for no other conceivable purpose than to traumatise tourists and ward off rapists from even stumbling upon the mere notion of laying with such fickle beasts.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Beowulf killed Grendel, who I have come to believe was and is an Irishman, and for good fricking reason.
    And in spite of all of this you can’t even get a moment of solace away from it all. Everywhere is filled with these people, clamouring together, driving, constantly walking. There’s no peace and quiet, no serenity. It’s constant hustle and bustle. And they aren’t even funny Leprechaun midgets who talk a lot, they just walk aimlessly, barely talking, being bereft of any joy or humanity, like bleak, vapid, banal automatons. I’ve been travelling to the most backwater, regional areas, and even away from broader civilisation, surrounded by paddocks and wildlife, it’s still filled with cars, or towns of 2000 people absolutely chocka block full.
    There’s a reason why so many Irishmen emigrated away from this gaudy land, it’s because the prospect of the New World is a land of bliss to these people. They would rather stave off crocodiles and live in a desert, than trek through another bog ridden wasteland, while having a Yank throw quarters at them for a photo.

    There are positives though. The Churches are quite lovely, the nature is nice, if diminished by the creeping sensation of modernisation and I do appreciate the quaint little shops. To clarify, I have been avoiding major cities, such as Dublin, to attempt to get a genuine country feel, albeit to no avail, as every area seems to be a major tourist attraction.

    Overall, Gerald of Wales was right.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Is Ireland actually worth visting if you don't care about the muh heritage crap?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe if you're very well off. If you're one of the slaves, you've probably never even heard a child speak.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      As someone from here, I'd say it's worth a short stay. It's a small island so you can travel around it easily and its position on the globe is pretty accessible so it's not a lot of hassle to visit. That said, it doesn't have as much to see and do as some bigger countries nearby like France or UK so I probably wouldn't make a dedicated 2 week trip out of it. Would be better to include it as part of a larger trip around that part of Europe in general or maybe as somewhere to go for a long weekend on a cheap flight

      People will be put off by the weather but I actually think the summer in Ireland has my favourite climate. Around the start of June, if it's a sunny day then the temperature will be around 20C - 25C so not too sweaty, it's bright until nearly 11pm and all the plants are in bloom. Also, because people here appreciate good weather more, you will see people out taking advantage of it which leads to a nice atmosphere in parks, beer gardens, etc. Of course, if you're looking specifically for a sun holiday then there are better places to go but something to keep in mind if visiting during that time of the year. The Fleadh Cheoil (annual Irish traditional music festival) and GAA intercounty championships (if you want to see a match of Gaelic football or hurling, 2 unique Irish sports) take place in summer so something extra to do then too

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      anywhere is worth it if you have a good attitude

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    go to Sligo. Easkey in particular. Nice beach. Could be on the way to/from Galway depending on the road you take. The Wild Atlantic Way is the route. Takes you through scenic Leitrim too over the River Shannon.

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