Realistically is it possible to move to Korea or Japan

But not as an ESL teacher?

For context I’m white and graduated from an Ivy League and have a high status in NYC. I’m not an English teacher chump

How can I move to Korea or Japan preferably without learning the language

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  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is it realistic to move to Japan or Korea? Sure, it's possible, you can make it happen with enough money and effort.
    Will you live the kino life you always dreamed of there? Not a chance, in this world dreams don't become reality kid. Wake up and smell the roses.

    • 4 months ago
      Cult of Passion

      Ive spent over a year living in Korea. All you need to do is leave every three months.

      >Wake up and smell the roses.
      Asia does NOT smell like roses.

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    I already visited both for 6 weeks each and lived the dream temporarily

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    "High status" do you even have 7 figures lmfao

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >He's black

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    There's lots of work Visas for Japan. Just get one of those. If you qualify for the high skill visa you can even get that and then move and finding a job when you get there.
    Korea has a digital nomad visa if you just want to go and work from there.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >the applicant needs a specific job offer in Japan from a Japanese organization that is willing to sponsor the visa

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        You only need to do that until you get permanent residency, which is a year or so.
        But yes, you'll have to get a job. There are many. Just go find one.

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Get an actual teaching certificate (accelerated post-bac), work in the US for 2 years, and you can get a job at any international school in the world. Extremely cushy benefits, often pay for housing/airfare, you only work with rich kids. Usually you'll have to do 2 years working in a culturally enriched charter school though.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      I said I don’t want to be an English teaching chump

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      I said I don’t want to be an English teaching chump

      it's a hell of a difference between working in an international school and working in a TEFL kiddie mill, idiot

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    From my research it's more likely for Japan than Korea but maybe that's because more weebs post about it on reddit.

    It depends on your degree / industry. But be prepared to work your fricking balls off to be worthy enough to convince an employer to pay for your work visa sponsorship over a local who's fluent in the local language, send out applications constantly for a long time.

    That's not even addressing the fact that the work life balance in both countries is fricking awful and the salaries are relatively shit too.

    Also accept the fact that you will most likely never be promoted into the high ranks and you will have to fight for it because they will pick a local Korean / Jap over you, you will always be on the lower peg.

    If the allure of starfish sex with sideways pussy is still too strong then you could do it, it's not impossible. I'd honestly argue the TEFL teachers probably have a much easier gig and their net savings per month are on par with the wagies due to having free housing so I wouldn't shit on them either.

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >preferably without learning the language
    come on man

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      I would attempt to learn it after I’ve moved there but not before

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I would attempt to learn it after I’ve moved there but not before
        Then you're not gonna make it

  8. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Ivy League
    Yes it should be easily doable in whatever field you're already in/pursuing
    >High status in NYC
    If that were true you wouldn't need to ask this question here

  9. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why the frick would you want to move to either country without learning the language?

  10. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Korea digital nomad visa

    60k/year job

    easy af to get with your "ivy" education?

    amiright?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah now find a job that will go through the ballache of allowing you to work remotely from Korea's timezone, modify your taxes / visa situation etc.

      The whole issue around all these digital nomad visas are that they don't work whatsoever for people working remotely without telling their employer as you are expecting to pay tax in the country you move too which immediately busts you.

  11. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >high status
    Sure. There's actually a visa for "I have 200k of frick you money just sitting in a savings account and don't need to work".

  12. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >japan
    >But not as an ESL teacher?
    no
    you need to have perfect fluent Japanese with N1 certs to prove it, then after that you need to have a better resume than the 100,000 Tanaka-sans who also want the job while also hoping that they want to sponsor you a visa (protip: they dont)
    even then, they either wont hang onto you long enough for you to get PR or they'll conveniently underpay you 'just' under the min reqs to get a PR just so you cant get it.
    99% of foreigners who live in japan and arent teaching english anymore are usually coasting by on a marriage visa and have some side-hustle or home business they set up (usually like a bar, cafe or restaurant).
    the rest end up as washed-up married ALTs still working for interac or an eikaiwa into their 50s trapped with no way out.

    at best, your hopes would be getting a job in a tech company in the US, learning japanese and convincing them to transfer you to Tokyo (overrated shit city)

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      I know random guys who work in Japan and Korea with zero knowledge of the language. They tend to work at shitty tech startups

  13. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Marry a Japanese woman and work remotely for a foreign company. That's what I did.
    If you're an incel, then work in tech for a start up company in Japan that has English as their official language.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      How long were you over there before you met and married? Or did you meet her outside of Japan?

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        We met outside of Japan, got married, then moved to Japan and applied for a spouse visa while there. I went there with no visa, just the 90 days visa-free travel. Spouse visa got approved after about 2 months and I could stay for a year. After renewing I could stay for 5 years.

  14. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    First of all, moving to any East Asian country without learning the local language is an automatic non-starter. Your employment and social opportunities will be severely limited by that factor lone.

    Second, why would you want to move to either country? They are both very beautiful and have rich histories and cultures. But they also have massive problems. Both countries have major demographic issues (which will increase the tax burden for all working-age people), and they are both prime targets for Chinese and/or North Korean aggression. Japan's economy has barely brown since the mid 90s, and their work culture is absolutely brutal. it's also no secret that it's a xenophobic country. Even if you were to learn the language, a significant portion of the populace would treat you like a second-class citizen.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      I want to work there for two or three years without damaging my career too badly (working as an ESL teacher would be damaging)

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I want to work there for two or three years
        That's an even worse idea. Both the Japanese Yuan and the South Korean Won are worth considerably less than the USD (presumably where you're from). By the end of your stint in either country, you will have been worked half to death and probably made less money than what you could have doing the same work in your own country.

  15. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    With Ivy you would land any job in your field easily in any country in Asia. The payment would be 2-5x times smaller than in USA but it's still will be higher than average in that country. The best case scenario is USA full remote job that have an office in Asia so they can make you visa easily but you will get paid like in USA, you will live like a king.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >With Ivy you would land any job in your field easily in any country in Asia
      This doesn’t seem to be the case without language capabilities, sadly

  16. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    What if I have loads of money and I don't want to work in Japan? Can I just stay in some cheap Japanese schools forever until I get married?

  17. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    > I have high status in NYC
    Lmao. Stfu. Either you have the money to buy your way in or you don’t. Nobody gives a damn if you’re a broke journalist living in the UWS and think you have “high status” or whatever. I wanted to give you advice until I read that unbelievably moronic line.

  18. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Join Samsung or another Korean company. But the best track is to join for an internship right out of an ivy league school. My friend finished his JD+MBA at NYU and joined Samsung and did his internship in Korea. They offered him a job after but he turned it down to go to Singapore

  19. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you're rich it's easy, pay and you get residency relatively easily.

    If you're a wagie, you need a job offer to get a residence permit which has to be renewed every year. Once 5 years passed by (Correct me if im wrong) you can apply for permanent residency.

    That's how it works usually.

  20. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don’t know why you people are so obsessed with moving to Asian countries. Men don’t get to just up and move and have a life in a foreign country like women do. You will always be an outsider, discriminated against at work, in school, in politics, in social settings, always and everywhere. Sure, you can be a loner living on the periphery of society or something, but unless you’ve got a creative or fully remote job that’s going to be awfully hard to achieve. So why do you want to go so badly? You won’t even make more money. By all means, live there for a year, a few years, but why do you want to move permanently?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      plenty of asian men moved to our country. They built the railroads, did our laundry, and built chinatowns in every city. Why cani't we do the same to them?

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        They were poor economic migrants, moron. Are you looking for work on the railroad or even to strike it rich? No. You’re taking a 50% pay cut to live near a ramen shop.

        What? For white men it’s easy to integrate, and make friends . I speak with personal experience

        Nobody said you can’t make friends, but they’re shallow friendships. If you’re not full of shit then you know as well as I that you’re never considered as anything other than the weird outsider.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      What? For white men it’s easy to integrate, and make friends . I speak with personal experience

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >discriminated against at work, in school, in politics, in social settings, always and everywhere.
      So, exactly like I am right now in the west?
      I'm sorry but I fail to see how that's a notable con when that's already my life.

  21. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you've ever worked in Silicon Valley it's easy to get a job in Japan. Their quality of programmers is abysmal. I got some job offers just talking with people in the industry.

  22. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lean Japanese and Korea first, then get back to me kiddo

  23. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    sage. im going to join the other anons in calling you a gay. youre a gay. stay in nyc.

  24. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you live in the USA and you leave for another country just to live some self fufilled dream you are a moron.

    Even a wagie job in the USA, you can monte carlo sim your retirements and you would be set to retire at 55 as a multi millionaire if you invested in just large caps and large cap growths.

    There a reason why so many people want to come here, it akin to winning the lottery.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      The American Dream is now to move to Europe.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Nah, the American dream is to flee cultural diversity. Europe will be a MENA colony by the time any Americans here retire.

  25. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Be extremely rich. There isn't a country on this planet that won't let some rich fricker live in their country. As long as you are spending your money there

  26. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    To give a serious opinion as a fellow Ivy grad who started in NYC and is now working in Asia, there are a few paths you can go down.

    1. Find an actual proper job in that country or try to get a way to transfer your existing job/similar position to work remotely. Bank I worked at in NYC did have options to try to go into the HK or Singapore branches, although actual KP/KR are harder without knowing language already since they don't operate in English. More realistic option is to just get a remote position and jump around on tourist visas for border runs (90 days here, 90 days there, before going back etc.)
    2. For actually teaching, an Ivy league degree can open lots of doors for elite private schools who are desperate to try to get a white face (yes they have literal Eastern Europeans or Middle Eastern teachers trying to teach "American" English just to have a white face on payroll.) These positions will pay vastly more than regular "teaching jobs" which are poverty tier for shitty schools. The ones I worked with (albeit in CN/HK) are equivalent to top private schools in the US with $30-40k+ tuition per student and can offer a decent experience. Might be a bit harder to get into tier 1 schools but secondary ones will probably take you on your degree alone.
    3. I knew bankers/consultants at top firms in NYC who did spend a year or two teaching/working more menial jobs in Asia just for the experience. Usually a lot easier right out of school where a gap is less problematic.
    4. Lastly, the "best" option is to find something you can do remotely and build your own business out of (if you can't find a decent flexible remote position). As everyone else pointed out, pay is absolute shit in these countries and you'll be severely diminished in your potential compared to sticking it out in the states. Try to get some time off and stay for a few weeks/months at a time to feel it out. Common phase is between leaving banking/consulting and before next job/MBA.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      To add on a bit of my experience, I started teaching TOEFL/SATs and editing resumes as a mini collegiate part-time job working for rich FOB kids (beats working dining hall or tutoring on campus), which led into further opportunities to work in some of these elite schools when I decided to pull the plug on NYC. It's a significant pay cut, but considering I work an average 20-30hrs now vs 80-100hrs a week in NY (while saving tons on rent/expenses), it's definitely a worthy trade off.

      That said, I would caution paths like this are generally only more viable when you have a decent amount of savings or external cash flows beyond your job. Have friends who tried to go into day trading (and these are top tier smart guys who graduated top of class from a HYPMS Ivy, and even that's tough), but I probably wouldn't recommend it. Still have the caveat that I don't expect my lifestyle to last more than another 3-5 years if geopolitics/WW3 breaks out, but I can just FIRE and live off passive investments if it comes to it. This lifestyle works much better as a penny-pincher though, given I basically saved/invested a good 90% of after-tax/rent income on a NYC finance job, so it gave me the cushion needed to take a risk.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I graduated from an Ivy and work in IB and I want to maintain a high status career which is why I can’t just be an ESL teacher

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      To add on a bit of my experience, I started teaching TOEFL/SATs and editing resumes as a mini collegiate part-time job working for rich FOB kids (beats working dining hall or tutoring on campus), which led into further opportunities to work in some of these elite schools when I decided to pull the plug on NYC. It's a significant pay cut, but considering I work an average 20-30hrs now vs 80-100hrs a week in NY (while saving tons on rent/expenses), it's definitely a worthy trade off.

      That said, I would caution paths like this are generally only more viable when you have a decent amount of savings or external cash flows beyond your job. Have friends who tried to go into day trading (and these are top tier smart guys who graduated top of class from a HYPMS Ivy, and even that's tough), but I probably wouldn't recommend it. Still have the caveat that I don't expect my lifestyle to last more than another 3-5 years if geopolitics/WW3 breaks out, but I can just FIRE and live off passive investments if it comes to it. This lifestyle works much better as a penny-pincher though, given I basically saved/invested a good 90% of after-tax/rent income on a NYC finance job, so it gave me the cushion needed to take a risk.

      Sounds very similar to what I'm planning on doing. Curious how old you were when you left NY? and what your total networth is?

      You're right in that for banking your only options really are only HK / SG and maybe Shanghai. Sounds like you got into international schools without a proper teaching license, I think China is the only place where you can get away with that these days.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Definitely wouldn't recommend my path given there's a lot of moving parts that are probably unique to my situation. Net worth from banking was probably a lot lower than expected since I left before 30, but I still have a cushion from other ventures. I'd say you should have between at least a 500k-1m NW is advisable before you take a super low income job, and my route was close to choosing FIRE with Asia teaching as a type of "barista FIRE" option (i.e. low income but casual for-fun job) that I don't really NEED to work at, but it's something to do.

        If you REALLY need a (prestigious looking) teaching license, Columbia's master's program is a joke, and even Harvard's 1yr education program is pretty easy to get into and there are plenty of state school kids there. Definitely considered going for the latter if I want to stay in the field long term, but not really a priority for me at the moment. For context, I don't directly teach in the schools proper (although probably could do so easily) but work with partnered external cram schools can arguably be better if you know what you're doing (better pay if you find the right ones, lower hours, less restrictions, etc. main requirements are the prestige factor, plus having native English/perfect scores).

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Appreciate the reply. Strangely we almost have the exact idea except I'm from bongland, currently 29 and approaching 500k USD equivalent (which for bong standards is pretty remarkable as our salaries are beyond poor).

          After tax I take home around 5.5k USD and my plan was always to reach coastFIRE and then do the Asia teaching arc. I could work a little harder and try and reach 6 figures in London but I think I'd put a bullet in my head for the equivalent of an extra £1k a month after tax, most of which will be blown on rent.

          I would probably do TEFL for a year, get a feel for it and then go back for a proper license somewhere if it's a legit path for me. Are you in China? I've heard 25k rmb with housing is the going rate, how do you fair against that? and hows the QoL? any regrets? I'm worried that doing this in my 30's is going to be a lot less cooler than I envisioned but let's see.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Nice to hear and glad to see some genuine discussion beyond all the classic trolling. I can definitely understand the hatred of the ratrace grindset (and I know I'd sooner jump off the roof of a Manhattan apartment than deal with the BS that comes from finance.) I think you have the right idea in terms of getting to FIRE status before seriously considering the Asia arc. As much as it sucks, maybe consider saving a few more years (at least until you're confident you won't need to rely on a salary again), even if it means frugality. I grew up in a miserly poorgay environment, so I basically saved every penny and still clip coupons/buy stuff on sale when in the states even when I have a few million in investments. This type of lifestyle is much more sustainable when you are willing to live simply albeit decently (get my tri tip for $4/lb on sale, then have a pound a day for a few weeks at a time etc.)

            As you mentioned, definitely try things out for a bit first before you go all-in. Take a few vacation trips, hang out with the people living the life, maybe spend a 3-month sabbatical to work in a similar summer program etc to get a feel for it before you quit your job for good. Honestly I didn't feel comfortable completely letting go until I had around $2m NW (not including knowing that parents will someday leave me a paid off house in the states), so take that how you will.

            Honestly teaching salaries have taken a huge cut in China (as with everything else). Unemployment is sky high and locals with actual PHDs in like biology from near Ivy/top 10 schools like Duke/JHU are fighting for high school teaching posts in elite high schools (like top 3-5 in a major city). That said, the simple fact of JBW plus a legit Ivy degree will open doors in at least a tier 2 school in the major cities (maybe rank 10 or so in the area), or if you go to a second tier city outside the usual Shanghai/Beijing/Shenzhen/Hong Kong etc.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              To add a bit more, yes I've been stuck in China for a decent portion of time (although had to go back to states during COVID shit show). Honestly the pollution definitely gets to me, and I'm looking to spend at least a few months or so to half a year working remote out of JP or TW. Get really bad symptoms including the usual respiratory issues (cough, almost bloody phlegm etc) and a LOT of cold sores in mouth, so YMMV on whether the city environment is for you. Generally better along the coast near HK, but can get pretty bad inland during the winter when the coal-burning heaters come online. I would say to take some trips during that season to see how whether you can adapt before going all-in. I definitely would prefer JP/KR/TW over mainland if I could, but being Chinese and knowing the language, my options are limited. Do note that China spends by far the most on English education so more opportunities, but the cost is needing to live in China.

              Honestly 25k RMB sounds a bit high unless you are talking about more elite institutions, and even they are taking pay cuts. Pretty sure a lot of JP teaching jobs are only offering half of that or less, but things can vary wildly depending on how far you go. If you can get in on building a tutoring business or become a status symbol for some of the big education companies, you can make a lot more than regular teaching in itself.

              Personally no regrets since I could feasibly retire tomorrow (and sometimes my disdain for some Chinese BS makes me want to quit), but I'll still ride it out until WW3 starts or something. Still would say I'm considering moving to even SEA compared to China if JP/KR/TW don't work out (at least Philippines knows English and has friendly long term visas).

              Thanks, the goal has never been to properly "FIRE" as I think short of starting my own business, it's practically impossible before 40 in the UK, the salaries just don't scale enough. That goes for finance roles too. I'm a SWE and I know of engineers who have grinded for years to get into Apple and they're on £80k... an extra £300 after tax per month compared to me and I woke up at 11am today and here I am at 2pm browsing SighSee...

              I've already got the frugality part down to a tee but even £1M is a long ways off, I think I'm happy with coastFIRE knowing I don't need to save anything else and I'll still have £1.25M at 50 years old. I'd rather work and do something otherwise I'll equally go insane.

              I've visited Chengdu a few months back and it was just soso, hardly any expats and the ones that were left seemed trapped there tbh. It seemed very lonely. My plan is to go to Thailand first without my employer knowing and riding it out until I get fired (which could be years anyway) and then move on. I'm probably set to inherit half a detached house + £300-500k but this will be in 20+ years or so but still kinda my plan for retiring.

              I think I'd prefer TW or HK or TH but I know the salaries and saving potential will be complete dogshit. But I'd rather give it a shot before doubling down on the license. If I was you I'd of left China already with $2M and took a bigger risk.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            To add a bit more, yes I've been stuck in China for a decent portion of time (although had to go back to states during COVID shit show). Honestly the pollution definitely gets to me, and I'm looking to spend at least a few months or so to half a year working remote out of JP or TW. Get really bad symptoms including the usual respiratory issues (cough, almost bloody phlegm etc) and a LOT of cold sores in mouth, so YMMV on whether the city environment is for you. Generally better along the coast near HK, but can get pretty bad inland during the winter when the coal-burning heaters come online. I would say to take some trips during that season to see how whether you can adapt before going all-in. I definitely would prefer JP/KR/TW over mainland if I could, but being Chinese and knowing the language, my options are limited. Do note that China spends by far the most on English education so more opportunities, but the cost is needing to live in China.

            Honestly 25k RMB sounds a bit high unless you are talking about more elite institutions, and even they are taking pay cuts. Pretty sure a lot of JP teaching jobs are only offering half of that or less, but things can vary wildly depending on how far you go. If you can get in on building a tutoring business or become a status symbol for some of the big education companies, you can make a lot more than regular teaching in itself.

            Personally no regrets since I could feasibly retire tomorrow (and sometimes my disdain for some Chinese BS makes me want to quit), but I'll still ride it out until WW3 starts or something. Still would say I'm considering moving to even SEA compared to China if JP/KR/TW don't work out (at least Philippines knows English and has friendly long term visas).

  27. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >I’m not an English teacher chump
    no, you're worse, you're an ivy league chump. stay in israelite york, korea's full.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >How can I move to Korea or Japan
      why would you move here. we're full.
      if you interested in korean work culture then i hope you won't suicide in a few years. it's too harsh for western people. even for koreans

      and this
      >stay in israelite york, korea's full.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I work in IB… 80 hour weeks are normal for me

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >I work in IB…
          Yeah and I'm the King of England
          Why does SighSee have such a high percentage of richgay LARPers?
          If you have that much money you can just fricking pay someone actually knowledgeable about immigration. There is literally an entire subset of lawyers who specialise solely in immigration for Japan or Korea. Go ask them. I doubt it will tickle your paycheck in the least (if you weren't lying out your ass lmao). They would give you a far better answer than any SighSee poster.
          >B-B-Buh I want free advice!!!
          An IB living in israelite York should be the first person to agree you don't get jack shit in life for free. Now drop the LARP or go see a lawyer bub.

  28. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >have a high status in NYC
    Daddy's bank account doesn't make you high status (whatever the frick that even means)

  29. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >ivy league
    >Didn't say the name
    State schools are better than Dartmouth or Brown bro.

  30. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why? You can make way more than you ever could in East Asia with that pedigree.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Because he is a loser with a severe case of yellow fever.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        NYC is filled to the brim with rice bunnies though. They value education as well so MUH IVY might get him laid.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >ivy league
          >Didn't say the name
          State schools are better than Dartmouth or Brown bro.

          Technically true, but you'd be amazed at how much further that status goes in Asia proper compared to NYC, not to mention OP's JBW bonus on top of that. There will unironically be parents who will nudge to see if you might be interested in their daughter (once she enters college ofc). Combination of the US citizenship and status of marrying an Ivy League guy (esp if it's one of the "big ivies" and not Dartmouth/Cornell/brown). Plenty of them will be far richer than you are, but the prestige alone can make up for it. And yes, the prestige goes so far that even "fake Ivies" like Cornell's public school, 2+2 exchange programs at Columbia/Trinity, or a 1y master's program in some useless humanities program in an an Ivy still have decent clout, so an actual proper undergrad (or ideally plus graduate degree) from a top Ivy are absolutely huge. At least in CN/HK, a kid just getting into Berkeley might be a city-wide celebrity and be featured in the news/have a 10meter poster plastered with their face outside the school. Now scale that up for even Cornell/Brown and you get the idea of how much these degrees are worshipped.

          It won't be quite as extreme in Japan and Korea since they aren't as obsessed with worshipping ivies (you'll just be considered equivalent to "regular" prestige such as Oxbridge or their local TokyoU or Seoul Normal U elite). For context, one major city might have upwards of 30-40 Oxbridge admissions per year, but maybe only 3-5 Ivy admissions, so it's much harder just to get into Cornell much less something even higher like HYPMS. Look at the relatively recent story where the ONLY KID to ever get admitted to Harvard from his province in China ended up marrying the billionaire daughter of Macau's casino king (he was still an undergrad marrying this girl who was already out of grad school).

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Why? You can make way more than you ever could in East Asia with that pedigree.

        To be completely honest, tons of Ivy League guys end up as unironic incels. Think about it, it's not just the rich multigen legacy rich kids who get in, plenty of autistic national champion mathletes and scrappy charity case kids from the hood who make it in from being the teachers pet. Some schools like MIT and Columbia have it better since they have dedicated all-girls schools next door where there are plenty of gold diggers eager to lock down the nerdy quant/compsci major who will make 250k+ starting salary. You can imagine the honey trap works especially well on these nerds who have never touched a woman in their lives.

        On the other hand, some other ivies are very much isolated in their bubble and dating is a bloodbath. Any moderately attractive girl is either arranged married to an equally elite guy (mostly the multigen legacy kids and top tier sorority girls/athletes), so the only ones remaining for "ordinary guys" are the femcel mathletes girls or the band/orchestra girls. The Asian clubs are an absolute shit show, 10+ guys simping over an average 5/10 or worse (knew unironic 5' tall gremlins with bad acne who could still have a dozen guys on hookup rotation).

        For these guys, the only "value" they offer is in their degree, smarts, and future income, all of which is invalidated when dealing with equally smart/rich girls. Either settle for your 3/10 looksmatch (at best), or play the local East Coast gold digger market on bumble/tinder (knew some former incels who got roped into blatant golddig marriage shortly after graduating), or just to go Asia (still gold/status digging, but at least you can find someone our of your league in looks).

  31. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    which country has better women?

  32. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm also trying to figure out how to move to Japan... I want to go there and get a Bachelor's degree (which is like a fraction of the price compared to the US) so I can get a visa afterwards; but from what I can tell, you can't get student loans in Japan as a foreigner... so how the hell does anybody do this? Did everyone that went to college in Japan just have rich parents this whole time who fronted the entire bill? Are Abroad in Japan and all those people trust fund kids? Or am I missing some loophole?

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Don't remember exactly what Chris Broad did, but I want to say most of the Western JP influencers started off as English teachers or worked in the media/communications industry which kick-started their careers as an influencer by appearing on local JP shows. I'm sure you can do more research about their actual paths, but it should be expected that you can't simply waltz into another country and get a degree there without paying for it.

      Same story as any type of out of state or private tuition in the states. If you can't afford the tuition, you probably can't afford to go to school there. You should probably look for at least a local community college/subsidized instate state school degree and look towards working in JP rather than jumping directly into a degree there unless you can afford it. Some places might have subsidies to attract international students (China has plenty for third workers and some American opportunities to, but you'd be stuck in China). Not sure if JP has a similar option, but odds are generally slim.

      Also, for as idealized as JP is to live, you should heavily reconsider actually trying to work there. Gaijin discrimination, poverty tier wages, and karoshi work culture are reasons why the country is dying. It's a wonderful vacation and possibly semi-retired nomadic life when you can cruise on life, but I don't think anyone would actually want to deal with double the workload for half the income in the US. Most likely best path to residency besides English teaching/buying a degree is to get married to a local.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Gaijin discrimination, poverty tier wages, and karoshi work culture are reasons why the country is dying.
        That sounds fine compared to being in Mexico 2. I went to the DMV in the suburbs the other day and was one of the only people speaking english lol.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          I mean I'm also leaving the US ASAP for a reason, but keep in mind even the minimum wage in blue states working in fast food is double what you'll get teaching English in JP. Interesting to hear from this board how income is even complete shit in even London/EU, so there's really no other option to make cash.

          Housing aside, I've found it pretty darn easy to povertymax in even Commiefornia, non-bougie grocery stores can offer apples/grapes/strawberries for <$1/lb compared to $3-5 in East Coast (and god forbid $5-10+ in Asia). Marinated tri-tip is $4 a lb on sale here compared to maybe $10-15 minimum anywhere in Asia (for far lower quality).

          Sure wages are so crazy I feel like I can't even afford McDonalds when they pay $15-20 an hour, but home cooked steak with fresh fruit/veggies ain't bad on <$10 a day. Yes, going to JP means I can actually afford to eat out at ramen and similar stores for like $5-10 a meal (instead of $20 minimum here) and even their conbini offers better wares than the overpriced garbage that is the "ready to eat aisle" here.

          Still, I think there's a lot to hate on the states for (assuming you're in a border state like CA/TX), but there are plenty of things that will be far worse abroad until you have limitless money. Would only recommend the full expat lifestyle when/if you can afford it rather than try to survive on garbage wages as a foreigner.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Cash isn't really that important when you end up raped or decapitated by some mutt peasants who have already infested the country and continue to grow in number every day. I'm leaving. Don't care about anything else. It's over.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            > leaving the rust belt just to live in poverty again
            atleast the food is better but your japanese will be moron level until a couple years in

            Cash isn't really that important when you end up raped or decapitated by some mutt peasants who have already infested the country and continue to grow in number every day. I'm leaving. Don't care about anything else. It's over.

            > moving because violence
            monkey see monkey do i guess americans learnt a lot from latinos, won't be long until Palestinians invade japan

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >student loans in Japan as a foreigner
      >have rich parents this whole time who fronted the entire bill?
      >trust fund kids?
      >am I missing some loophole?
      You should ask yourself why these are the first thoughts that came to your mind when other people are able to afford things like studying abroad.
      Have you considered that these people may work part-time jobs, have scholarships, or both? All while minimizing expenses and being as thrifty as possible.
      Not only that, but public universities are dirt cheap which you're well aware of already.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >student loans in Japan as a foreigner
      >have rich parents this whole time who fronted the entire bill?
      >trust fund kids?
      >am I missing some loophole?
      You should ask yourself why these are the first thoughts that came to your mind when other people are able to afford things like studying abroad.
      Have you considered that these people may work part-time jobs, have scholarships, or both? All while minimizing expenses and being as thrifty as possible.
      Not only that, but public universities are dirt cheap which you're well aware of already.

      I'm a westerner doing a bachelors in korea, so not japan but I assume some parts are similar enough.
      Yeah, if you're studying abroad outside of the us, especially outside of a western country you cant get student loans, you have to take private loans (if you're okay with debt)
      The reality is that most people studying abroad in those countries (usually chinese/ other asians) are funded by their parents, who are usually okay with footing the bill for their education, usually the case is:
      >if you have to do part time jobs to get money, you cant afford studying abroad
      People who do part time jobs while studying in asia usually do it to get spending/drinking money, not to pay for their education, it's very very hard to pay for your whole college degree on a part time job salary, especially since you usually have limited hours.
      >public universities are dirt cheap which you're well aware of already.
      Universities in asia are in theory cheaper, but what's starting to happen is in korea at least, is that they are jacking up the prices for foreigners, since they are not allowed to increase tuition prices for natives.

      With most westerners doing bachelors here, they usually get in on government scholarships, which are actually somewhat difficult to get.
      I actually got rich off of crypto and that's how I'm paying for my degree, you might want to look into that route.

  33. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why would you though?
    Being rich obviates every single one of the downsides of living in the USA.
    Ugly women? Just be rich.
    Out of shape? Just get a personal trainer.
    Bad food? Just shop where rich people by nice things instead of food desert goyslop.
    Crime infested neighborhood? Just live around other rich people instead.
    Shitty weather? Live/vacation/2nd home at a nice location.
    Woke public schools? There's many private schools.
    Being rich in other developed countries though kind of sucks because they tax the frick out of you and discourage you from consooming more than the average.

    If you're so set on moving though you should be able to find an executive level position for an American company in your industry that has an office in Japan. Just network your way into it if you're really so successful. simple as.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Can't tell if serious or trolling, but there's a lot of truth in this post. Most of not all issues mentioned can indeed be settled with enough income. The only caveat I would add is the idea of "value for money".

      Even when I'm making 500k a year, if that's in NYC, im barely above middle management and just getting by. I knew multimillionaire bankers who can only afford a small 1500sqft house in Greenwich that's worse than my childhood home, but it has its nice location so it's worth like $3-5m. Instead, if I go abroad, I could easily get a far nicer mansion for a fraction of the cost. Yes, one solution is to stop making 500k and make $1m or $2m a year, but ultimately there's a cap. I know decamillionaires still living in a small cramped but "luxury" apartment in HK where they could just instead buy an entire private island elsewhere. When you no longer NEED to live there for work, you should go where you get the most value or happiness per dollar spent. Some people like being the small fish in a big pond, but others enjoy the opposite of not being stuck in the ratrace.

      More money will fix most problems, but not all. Sometimes just being stuck in the city intrinsically makes us miserable. Even after dining at a michelin star restaurant in NYC, there's something off-putting about walking out into a trashy street with homeless people where the entire area smells like stale piss. Same goes for SF: yes you can move into the gated suburbs, but while working in the city, you truly can't escape poverty and decay no matter how much money you have.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I wasn't trolling but maybe being a bit tongue in cheek.

        The US is set up to reward the winners. This is generally true everywhere in the country. It's a miserable place to be a wage slave but a fantastic place to be rich, good looking, lucky or some combination of the above. There's lower cost places than NYC that have a high quality of life. Even SF with all it's problems just looks beautiful, in a very Parisian way. Despite the shit, the light is soft and golden, and the climate mild.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        i would say do it if you've never traveled much just for the experience but there's a reason that digital nomad aren't as popular as before: visa, moving and loneliness sucks

  34. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Then hire a migration agent like anyone with money would.

  35. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    you can get investment visa for japan and the new whitey visa for korea with little expense or effort if you have your things together. neither require knowledge of the language.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >whitey visa for korea
      explain

  36. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    ARE YOU MALE OR FEMALE?

    That's all that matters.

  37. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lots of job openings for foreigners according to my recruiter friend in Japan. Don’t need fluency, many positions are for middle management and higher, and the cards continue to go into the prospective hire’s favor. hire a recruiter if your IVY league prestige still makes you too moronic to find work

  38. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I can't actually decide which country to go to and which language to learn (at least which language to learn first)
    I feel like Korea will be a better choice to live in but I really like the japanese language

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Outside of seoul korea is a third world shithole

  39. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is doing a masters in japan a good idea?

  40. 4 months ago
    sage

    Dress like a maid and have a nice day

  41. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    > JLPT N1
    >80 points on hsp visa
    > 300k/yr job, can support work from japan and get paid same salary
    > only 300k net worth most in crypto
    >24, gf is 27 gonna start family soon
    Where should I move to? Want to be in Tokyo at first
    Also after 1 year I can get permanent residency and start my own company for tax purposes is anyone here knowledgeable about that sort of thing (reducing as much taxes as 1099 in japan)
    Hoping to get to 8 figures in the next 10 years

  42. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've been in Japan for the last ~2 years.
    In my experience, most of the foreigners who are not English teachers (which already removes 50% of people and 90% of women) here fall into one of the following categories:
    - working in IT and found a job directly, often at a multinational but also some domestic companies
    - working in IT or finance and got transferred to a Japanese office of a multinational company
    - working in research
    - used to be an English teacher, got married, then set up some meme business

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Took a trip to japan a couple months ago. From my experience talking to people who were from the west and now living there, all of them were in those categories. Honestly, after having trouble finding a computer job with my degree, after talking to an IT guy working in Tokyo I have thought about trying to get into a mediocre IT position just to try to work my way to getting an IT job in Japan for a few years. It sounded pretty cool and not really too necessary to speak perfect Japanese.

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