Somebody talk me out of moving long-term to California. Advantages

Somebody talk me out of moving long-term to California

Advantages
- Great professional opportunities (background is finance)
- Beautiful nature
- Beaches
- Skiing
- Possibly the best cycling scene in America after Colorado (important to me)
- Food
- Nightlife

Disadvantages
- High cost of living
- High taxes
- Local politics and municipal government is a disaster

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  1. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    it's gay

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      it POLITICO!!
      also if you are overweight, you will be expected to frick off from public view and not even do touristy stuff unless you are vomiting up large swaths of cash every step you take

      -if you are THIN, AND you don't look crap, you'll be fine almost anywhere

      appearance matters MORE and is taken as a direct Political stance here

  2. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    i moved here from wisconsin because my gf got into an ultra prestigious bay area program that would've been impossible to turn down. honestly its been better than expected and im starting to actually enjoy it.

    dollars and cents wise its not as bad as you think. though we live in graduate student housing which really helps. the taxes are really not any worse and in many ways better than oregon, illinois, connecticut, new york, massachusetts etc. its not great, but its manageable.

    the people can be a little up their own ass definitely, but its certianly nowhere near as pozzed as I was expecting. I had lived through madison going from a normal-if-not-left-leaning town into rabidly pozzed and woke so I was dreading going into the belly of the beast. not so really, way more balanced than I was expecting.

    we are not staying here. once her program is done we leave. so maybe that's why I can enjoy it because I know its not permanent, but overall it has greatly exceeded my expectations and im actually really learning to like the place. though to be fair its one of the most expensive areas in the world and we pay about 20% the average rent.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thanks for the response.

      Could you be a bit more specific in what you liked about the area?

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        idk what to tell you. its extremely high quality of life and you're living among really educated and successful people. its nice, even if you have to deal with some undesirables (most of the undesirables are people who've gotten a little too obsessed with being rich btw).

        it costs a lot for access to that. the cost is really about keeping people they don't want out.

        that's all there is to it. your mileage is going to vary on whether you will be a personality fit. I can't tell you, nor do I really want to write more than I have (I feel like i've exceeded reasonable SighSee expectations already).

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm from California though San Diego which is much less pozzed (due to military presence) but that is also changing and its becoming more homosexual and they elected a socialist beaner for a mayor. Anyway, the CoL sucks but there's things that make up for it. Food, and in particular, fresh produce, is absolutely better priced and more widely available and higher quality than in the midwest or east. There's lots of inexpensive ethnic food. Here, its mexican food, in the bay area you can get a takeout lunch of indian or asian food for under $10. You can always find something to do. I don't know how much you've explored the mountains and coasts of California but just driving around is jaw dropping gorgeous. I've also noticed people aren't as political here, though solidly democrat, as they are in places like Madison or Austin, blue bubbles in red states because I think liberals don't feel like they're "under attack" and don't usually make their politics their personality. Nobody seriously believes that abortion is going to be banned in California.
      Cycling is a gay pasttime though, no joke. Most of them are gay men.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Biking beats the frick oit of driving

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          No it fricking doesn't.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            It really does. Frick driving and frick parking.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          good attitude to have in CA.

          like anon you are replying to said, food prices are pretty competitive (I think he's a little misguided saying they are better than the midwest...if anything its about equal to what it was in wisconsin) and most things are pretty standardized in price across the US.

          housing and transportation are what kills you. driving will put you in the poorhouse. we are a one car household and maybe burn between 1/8-1/4 tank every week, it doesn't hurt too bad.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >I think he's a little misguided saying they are better than the midwest...if anything its about equal to what it was in wisconsin
            I was specifically talking about fresh groceries in particular produce especially if you look outside of big chain stores, and much better variety, I just got a couple pomegranites for $0.97 each, I don't even think they sell those in Wisconsin... and that's another thing, its really hard to find healthy food in the midwest. You can generally find healthy options for entrees or even just sides in California. You can get grilled vegetables with brown rice as a side at a steakhouse. If you order a salad in Wisconsin its iceberg lettuce with shredded cheddar cheese on it, gross and nutritionally void, and their other side options are mac and cheese or different preparations of fried potatoes.

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              yeah you're still pretty far off base. the eating habits of midwesterns are not due to the expense or lack of options. within walking distance of us in madison were multiple options essentially identical in scope and price in terms of produce to california
              >I don't think they even sell *pomegranates in wisconsin
              1) learn how to spell the word 2) Idk what fricking year you think this is or somehow think that people can't get something as mundane as a pomegranate in a supermarket just about anywhere in america, let alone a city that's a state capital and home to one of the 50 or so largest universities in the world.

              but yes obesity was ramapnt, people shovel chain goyslop into their mouths at a disgusting rate. its a sad state of affairs, but its largely a cultural issue that is partly driven by climate.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Madison also isn't really a typical midwest town. It's a semi-cosmopolitan place, like an island in an ocean of blandness. There's probably even a Whole Foods. This is just from my own experience, I loathe traveling between the rockies and appalachians because I know I'll get stopped up from lack of anything green on the menu and excessive use of yellow cheese. Whether that's driven by cultural or economic factors, I don't really care.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                to pretend this exact dynamic you're lamenting doesn't exist in massive swaths of rural and small-city california is really farcical. LA and SF are no less cosmpolitain than chicago, san diego isn't even at that level and is more comprable to minneapolis. its all the same. america has been globohomo'd into oblivion particulary in the culinary realm. nowhere that is broadly populated has any real room to claim superiority on somewhere else.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                They are though. Rural california is still much, much more cosmopolitan, less religious and much more accepting of differences among people. Republicanism in the red counties of CA is much more moderate. The CA coasts are too liberal but inland CA is really what the rest of the country should be like, rather than the depressing, anti-intellectual, insular, inward looking place it is. Look, you just posted about how great CA is compared to Wisconsin and why the CoL and bullshit you put up with here compared to Wisconsin is worth it, and now you're trying to walk it back. If CA, as a whole, really isn't any better than the midwest in any meaningful ways, and is just more expensive you might as well just delete the thread.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                no, what I'm walking back is this preposterous superiority complex and coastalism. america is a mush, shit is roughly the same anywhere you go in terms of what is available in a store.

                the pros of california are that is has some extremely high quality of life areas only really open to people of a certain socioeconomic means. the fact that I'm living there paying like $1800/mo in rent (which I then split two ways) means that yeah I'm having a pretty good time. though yeah man, some of the people suck.

                there exists degrees of nuance pretty much anywhere you go. this idea that you, a person who cannot even spell the word pomegranate, is actually making these wide generalizations about approx 1/3rd of the country is the exact sort of anti-intellectual, insular, inward looking worldview you claim to reject.

                also
                >implying anti-religious is good
                >implying california is even particularly irreligious with all the fricking immigrants they pump into the place every chance they get
                >implying you don't just mean anti-western religion, which to be totally honest with you mi familia sounds a lot like social programming to replace your faith in something greater than yourself with a faith in nothing other than yourself and the decision you make as a consumer

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                Pretty ballsy mocking anyone's intelligence when you're a fricking christcuck

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                There are some exceptions. Burgers are better in Salt Lake City than in New York or Seattle and good luck finding a decent soft shell crab anywhere other than Virginia, Maryland, and neighboring coastal states

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                I've been to Wisconsin during the winter for a few months working. Somethings I've learned
                >really small but connected communities
                >shit ton of beautiful places to see
                >shit ton of farms
                >bars literally everywhere even by high schools
                >cold but friendly culture once accepted
                >most alcoholics I've ever seen in my life
                >Kwik trip is the best thing during the winter
                >Madison, and Milwaukee... pretty much it for big cities

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Rich people are still moving to California; it's primarily poors who are moving out of the state.
          California is only 5.7% black, down from 7.7% in 1980. However, California blacks are a protected species, so they have free rein to be as "ghetto" and obnoxious as they like. They also get hella gibs.
          My boss' daughter lives in Huntington Beach, the last White-run conservative city on the West Coast. She loves it there.

          Bicycling is awesome, especially in a climate as mild as California's. You have to pick a bike-friendly area to live, however. Stay far from the shithole areas.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah I assume things would look pretty rosy if your only paying 1/5 of your main living expense. Don't forget that CA has progressive tax brackets so pay raises and bonuses get sucked dry. And if you ever managed to buy a house you'd be paying 1% on ~$1.2 million every year for starters.

      But money really isn't even the biggest deal. These two anons were close:

      The thing is there's like 1000 things that are "no big deal" But when you add them up you realise why California's population has started to decline.

      I'm the San Diego anon. I'm thinking about leaving honestly because its this. It's 1000 stupid things. It's not just that taxes are high, but there's a ton of illegals but and the state spends my money to encourage and coddle them, rather than enforcing the law. It's not just that there's a stupid smog check program, but next year you won't be able to buy a gas chainsaw in CA. It's become an Australia like nanny-state under Newsom and the change happened really fast. 10 years ago it was fun, carefree and you could basically do whatever you wanted.

      You basically have an army of state legislatures like infamous I'm-Definitely-Not-A-Pedo Scott Weiner passing moronic legislation year-after-year that costs you time to comply with. And it went from eye-rolling to suffocating and if you're at all paying attention, you realize that the entire State of CA apparatus exists to suck time and money out of its productive citizens and reward the non-productives for their votes. Enjoy your stay!

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >if you ever managed to buy a house you'd be paying 1% on ~$1.2 million every year for starters.
        That's one of the few based things about CA is there is a hard cap on property tax though this benefits the boomers who bought a beach front house in 1975 and pay $800/year in taxes. Of course, the "progressives" are trying to undo it but that seems like the one thing that's a bridge too far in CA and the voters won't go for it.

  3. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Don't forget
    >crime has skyrocketed
    >insane amounts of homeless
    >Stuck up "win at all costs" mentality
    >vehicle inspection
    >cucked gun laws
    I wouldn't

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >vehicle inspection
      excuse me what?

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        You have to get a smog check on any vehicle made since 1975

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          yes you need to pay money to have your car inspected to make sure it complies with emission regulations. You can't drive your car if you don't do this

          how often? once or annually?

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        yes you need to pay money to have your car inspected to make sure it complies with emission regulations. You can't drive your car if you don't do this

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          smog check is like $30 biannually. its really not a huge deal and honestly worth having considering what air quality used to be like.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            The thing is there's like 1000 things that are "no big deal" But when you add them up you realise why California's population has started to decline.

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              I'm the San Diego anon. I'm thinking about leaving honestly because its this. It's 1000 stupid things. It's not just that taxes are high, but there's a ton of illegals but and the state spends my money to encourage and coddle them, rather than enforcing the law. It's not just that there's a stupid smog check program, but next year you won't be able to buy a gas chainsaw in CA. It's become an Australia like nanny-state under Newsom and the change happened really fast. 10 years ago it was fun, carefree and you could basically do whatever you wanted.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                california has developed this complex where they believe that by sheer market size they can force manufacturers to make US-wide changes via their state decisions. so once they get it in their heads that they're righteous beyond any shadow of a doubt (not much of a barrier to these people....) they try to play this card.

                its not without precedent, but its also the kind of thing that has obvious limits. I suspect strongly that they are pressured by the national democrats into doing this sort of thing too.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            [...]
            how often? once or annually?

            ah nevermind

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            It's not needed anymore due to advances in vehicle technology and is just a money grab and a way to keep poors financing vehicles every 5 years. Washington, not exactly a "frick government" red state got rid of their vehicle inspections program. It wasn't necessary anymore.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >considering what air quality used to be like.
            you are right that air quality in California used to be beyond terrible, but that was like....60 to 70 years ago?

            The other guy is right, it's unnecessary in the current era and is another thing that makes driving more expensive here compared to anywhere else in the country

            Is that a good thing? I guess it depends who you ask, less cars on the road *would* be a desirable side effect of these laws, but THAT'S NOT HAPPENING

            The fact of the matter is they are making driving more expensive and difficult without offering any real alternatives. Public transit in LA is total ass, there is no cycling infrastructure, so really you need to drive if you don't want to spend hours on commute every day

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        gotta check if you have any beaners

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >vehicle inspection

      Nah this isn't some commie shithole like Texas, no vehicle inspections, only bi-annual smog which isn't a big deal if you're not poor/moronic

  4. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >High cost of living
    this alone sinks California as a destination so hard it's not really worth considering

  5. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    I moved out to southern California from Maryland 13 years ago. If you can afford it, the California coast from Newport Beach to La Jolla is fricking paradise.
    Yes, the people here are flaky as shit. Yes, LA is an absolute shithole. Yes, it's expensive. But the perks of living here are just too good if you're making good money. The hiking, the beaches, the National Parks, the ski resorts and the endless outdoor activities you can do here are too good. You won't regret it.
    You have to learn to adapt to the culture. First off, you can forget about ever having a good pizza, good BBQ, homestyle American cooking, or any Italian food ever again in a restaurant. You will now eat Thai, Korean and Vietnamese food. Second, you can forget about making any new best friends. You will meet a never-ending series of short term friends. Third, you will never own a home. Your goal is to find the apartment complex with the least kids, no Mexicans and the best amenities.

    Living here indefinitely isn't a great plan, because the taxes and cost of living are skyrocketing. Have a blast out here and find a job with pension. Then retire somewhere in Europe like Portugal, Croatia, Italy or MonteBlack. Because you will never been able to live anywhere with shitty weather ever again.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Based, I live in Irvine but also lived in Newport Beach and can confirm it is like an oasis here

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        LOL. Where did you live in Newport? I lived there too for 10 years right in front of the Balboa Pier.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Because you will never been able to live anywhere with shitty weather ever again

      This. 1000% this.
      Born and raised in San Clemente, moved to Maryland for a little over two years and wanted to shoot myself the whole time. I have no clue why humans decided to settle there, and why people continue to live there today. Just depressing, and hardly anything to do. I'm a SoCal bro for life.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >why people continue to live there today
        Because white haven't died out yet, spicoid.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Maryland
          >White

          >Because you will never been able to live anywhere with shitty weather ever again

          This. 1000% this.
          Born and raised in San Clemente, moved to Maryland for a little over two years and wanted to shoot myself the whole time. I have no clue why humans decided to settle there, and why people continue to live there today. Just depressing, and hardly anything to do. I'm a SoCal bro for life.

          I'm from California and thought Maryland has a pretty alright climate. I've been there a few times during different seasons and its been pretty, winters weren't terribly cold and summers weren't that bad. It's too close to DC and full of glowies tho. Pass for that reason.

  6. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hi from an old fart. I lived in California for the largest part of my adult life, a total of close to twenty years, before I left the country five years ago. I’d previously lived for at least a few years each in Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, and Wisconsin (also briefly in New Mexico and Oklahoma, but those were very temporary). I’ve got friends and family all over the US, and I’m very widely traveled. Seen most of the USA, at least in passing, sometimes in detail.

    My experience in California (mostly in San Francisco, perhaps SighSee’s least favorite place in the USA) has been that the positives have always outweighed the negatives. Outside of housing, which is undeniably hugely overpriced in most places someone would want to live (although the market is softening minutely at the moment), I never found the cost of living especially severe. It’s very easy to eat on the cheap, there are few places in the world with more impressive ranges of cuisines on offer than LA or the Bay Area, and I agree with the poster above that if you know how and where to shop the fresh produce is probably the best in the country; Californian farmers do grow a full half of the US’s entire fruit and vegetable crops, along with nearly all the nuts (badum-CHA! but also an agricultural fact). Taxes are about the highest in the country, but the structure is such that you’re either getting a deal similar to whatever you pay now or you’re rich enough to afford to pay them.

    And while it’s fun to highlight the ways in which the state and various municipalities are fricked up, local governance is in general probably better than most people think it is, in most places and in most ways. State government is actually more functional than most by lots of measures.

    But regarding this:
    >Possibly the best cycling scene in America after Colorado
    Not sure what kind of cycling you mean, but friends in MN are always bragging about their bike culture. Maybe just MPLS?

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      I lived across the bridge from SF in Tiburon for a year and half. I absolutely loved Tiburon. It was insanely beautiful. You got all the advantages of living in SF, but none of the crime or homelessness. I kayaked, biked and played basketball outside all year. The weather wasn't as good as it is in socal, but it was better than 95 percent of the rest of the country. I would probably have stayed longer, but the cost of living was really bad in Marin. Rent was absolutely insane. A 700 square foot apartment in Tiburon was $3200/month. After a year, they hit you with a 10 percent increase and some fees and then you're at $3600 a month. That's $43,200 a year in just rent. Then you have to pay a $9 toll every day to cross the bridge and $30/day for parking in the city. Add in $6/gallon for gas. You have to make 150K a year to live comfortably in Tiburon if you're renting.
      In Orange County, you can still find apartments in nice areas for around 2000. The weather is also significantly better down south. There's also more to do. I'd argue that the food is better down here too. Marin County had TERRIBLE restaurants. We could only find good food in SF and it was always a pain in the ass to drive across the bridge into the city and find parking.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      I could be wrong, but I thought California had a pretty good road and mountain biking scene

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I could be wrong, but I thought California had a pretty good road and mountain biking scene
        It may well; my wife is a triathlete and met a lot of serious/competitive cyclists over the years, and I assume there’s good mountain biking in the Sierras. I was mostly thinking about urban/day-to-day transportation biking, which is pretty bad in SF (not only because it’s extremely hilly, but also because drivers are hostile and nuts), not great elsewhere in the Bay Area, and presumably shit in LA. But it’s not my scene, so I shouldn’t try to make proclamations about it.

  7. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    You'll need to spend some time out there to see if it's really for you. The nature and outdoor activities are spectacular. The horrific government, the failing infrastructure, skyrocketing prices of EVERYTHING, wildfires, pollution, traffic and the shitty attitudes that many people have are not.

    I enjoy California and I go out there several times a year for work, have also spent a lot of time visiting friends or just hanging out. In recent years, I have noticed that literally 90% of people in the Bay Area are openly planning to leave (or at least want to). SoCal is a little lower, but I'd put it at 50% plan to leave.

    Long term, I think the state is in trouble. It has absolutely massive welfare entitlements thanks to open immigration; this works OK when you have a prosperous tax base, but Cali's tax base has been fleeing for years, and the pandemic accelerated it. NorCal is suffering more because tech jobs are easier to relocate, whereas the entertainment industry is still geographically centered in LA.

    It's not hard to see a death spiral happening where a fleeing tax base results in higher taxes on the ones who remain... OR a scaleback of entitlements... both of which would contribute further to the decline.

    Finally, I hate the idea of living in a state with literal hundreds of thousands of insane street-dwelling homeless, and hundreds of thousands of violent gang members, and being limited in means of self defense. If shit hits the fan you will be trapped in SF or LA or wherever with a bunch of armed people who hate you.

  8. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >- Great professional opportunities (background is finance)
    I would recommend NYC. Yes the weather is worse but surely the opportunities and exciting nightlife more than make up for it.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      NYC jobs pay much better but are extremely competitive, both to get them and move up.

      If my career was my absolute number one priority, I would, without question, try and move to New York. Its just everything else else that makes me think California is better.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        you are OP right? What city in California are you planning on moving to? SF, LA, or SD?

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yes, I'm OP.

          It would heavily depend on what role I was offered and where. The only thing I would add is I think the traffic situation in LA would slowly drive me insane.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        NYC is also very competitive and hostile in ways that California isn't. Californians are generally sunny people who dislike the idea of stepping on each other, though will do it when "nobody is looking." Finding an apartment in NYC is very competitive and is a huge pain, getting groceries in NYC is a huge pain. NYC is full of high ugly people with high social expectations but California is full of pretty people who have low social expectations.

  9. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    What are some of the smaller to medium sized places in California like? I'm thinking of places like Santa Cruz or Monterey and places around that size

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Santa Cruz is a little dumpy. Capitola is nicer. I'd also go Carmel over Monterrey. The weather is better down south. Santa Barbara or Orange County, or northern SD county is where you want to be.

  10. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    I suffer here so much it's unreal

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      poor mexicans need not apply.

  11. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    I live in SF and was born and raised in the bay. Can talk to the bay area but to understand your situation, let me know the following:
    1. What is your Total Annual Comp (base salary + bonus + OCI) and what is your job situation (are you stable? will they readjust your salary if you move? etc)
    2. Are you in any debt?
    3. Are you thinking of moving with someone or alone? If alone, are you willing to live outside the city? Are you willing to live with roommates?

    these will help me give you an answer.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      1. My comp varies a lot year to year. I make low six figures base salary but there's a performance component that can be substantial in good years and almost negligible in bad years. Whether or not I do end up moving would *heavily* depend on whether or not I get offered a good job, or I can transfer internally at my current company (most likely option).

      2. Im not in debt and have a decent amount of saving and investments. I would prefer not to tap into these, but if it's necessary, I can.

      3. Alone, yes, and yes. I have relatives who live in San Jose. I don't see them often, but I am close with them.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Great to know you're financially secure and I think you have enough base salary income to not bleed-out financially. Typically studio apts and 1bd condos cost ~$2,500 per month in rent. Using the 30% rule, that bang-on hits the $100K income threshold - so I think you can scrape with living alone (note I said scrape by, you're by no means thriving). Really your only savings comes in the form of that performance bonus, which isn't ideal.

        I would first confirm your new job and try to go for something with higher base pay and less bonus pay. You could also tell your company to re-comp you as you're living in the HCOL area. Concurrently, I would also visit your family for two weeks and just take that time to visit areas you'd like to live in. Here's where I'd check (I'm starting in SF and going clockwise):

        San Francisco (Northwest side - only semi-normal place left in the city), San Rafael, Piedmont, Moraga / Lafayette, Danville, Pleasanton (my home town), Los Gatos, Cupertino, Los Altos, San Carlos, Burlingame, Pacifica

        Once you're done with this list and get the job, I would move in alone. If you have to go with roommates, vet the shit out of them and I would actually only suggest roommates in SF as they could be a first set of friends in the area.

        As for friends it can be a bit tough as everyone is an automaton. Luckily there are tons of cycling clubs everywhere and you can make great friends. Here are a list of great cycling spots:
        1. HWY 1 Southbound for scenery and endurance (stop in pescadero for coffee and food)
        2. Mt Tam and the Marin Headlands Northbound (cliffside ocean view)
        3. Mt Diablo summit to Athenian School descent
        4. Skeggs Point
        5. Golden Gate to Black Sands Beach
        6. Mission Peak Mtb climb

        If you're into beaches then surfing is everywhere (I surf weekly so there's no shortage of spots). Skiing is all-time as well just ensure that you bring chains. Also, you have to leave at like 4am if you want to day trip it.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          [...]
          Ok Pt 2 sorry. The one positive you list that is wrong is the nightlife. If you move to SF or frequent SF, you'll notice that nightlife is non-existent. Most of the city is closed by ~10pm - which neuters thw whole point of a 'city'. SF is more akin to a dense suburb sometimes. There are only a handful of clubs, bars, and restaurants that stay open later, mostly in north beach and adjacent areas.

          To your negatives:
          1. Yes, we have the highest cost of living, but the basket of goods is heavily tilted towards gas and housing. Rent is the biggest factor as there is a housing shortage. Driving to all the towns I mentioned prior, you'll quickly realize that the shortage is because of geography, boomer NIMBYs, greedy landlords, and moronic housing laws. Gas prices are also the highest in the nation due to gas taxes and more refining that is california-specific. Food isn't so bad - it is pricey but the Central Valley produces 25% of the nations food and about half the fruits and veggies. It is worth the price and you better learn to cook as you can find fantastic food.
          2. Yes we have high taxes. But if you're not a consumer it isn't that onerous. Stop spending money at restaurants - they will jack you for every last penny.
          3. Yes but you'll find quickly that the way out of it is money. The bay are is about money. Full stop. More money is less problems. Why? Because the bay area is an economic south africa. Drive around the hills of SF or the penninsula and you'll see it: wealth inequality can buy you out of even the most moronic governor or the most cracked-out homeless.

          [...]
          In short - you seem to have the money to survive here. If you can commit to growing your income and not get sucked into driving endlessly (i.e. you have to drive more than an hour one-way - which I had to at one point) then the bay area is fantastic. The one general thing I need to mention is that you should never "scrimp by". In this place, pinching pennies brings more problems than savings. If you try to save on rent, you'll live in the tenderloin, surrounded by crack addicts and ""youths"". Same with bayview, same with oakland, same with Richmond, same with San Bruno, same with East Palo Alto.

          Remember, the bay is an economic version of South Africa. You have gated enclaves of rich people, who can buy their way out of seeing anyone poor and any problem. Then you have the poor blighted areas which are dangerous if you're not careful.

          If you can barely afford it, you can't. You need to be comfy in your budget, don't compromise because you will land in a no-go zone and your problems will compound exponentially. Blowing up any savings you may have made.

          This is all incredibly useful. Thank you so much

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Great to know you're financially secure and I think you have enough base salary income to not bleed-out financially. Typically studio apts and 1bd condos cost ~$2,500 per month in rent. Using the 30% rule, that bang-on hits the $100K income threshold - so I think you can scrape with living alone (note I said scrape by, you're by no means thriving). Really your only savings comes in the form of that performance bonus, which isn't ideal.

        I would first confirm your new job and try to go for something with higher base pay and less bonus pay. You could also tell your company to re-comp you as you're living in the HCOL area. Concurrently, I would also visit your family for two weeks and just take that time to visit areas you'd like to live in. Here's where I'd check (I'm starting in SF and going clockwise):

        San Francisco (Northwest side - only semi-normal place left in the city), San Rafael, Piedmont, Moraga / Lafayette, Danville, Pleasanton (my home town), Los Gatos, Cupertino, Los Altos, San Carlos, Burlingame, Pacifica

        Once you're done with this list and get the job, I would move in alone. If you have to go with roommates, vet the shit out of them and I would actually only suggest roommates in SF as they could be a first set of friends in the area.

        As for friends it can be a bit tough as everyone is an automaton. Luckily there are tons of cycling clubs everywhere and you can make great friends. Here are a list of great cycling spots:
        1. HWY 1 Southbound for scenery and endurance (stop in pescadero for coffee and food)
        2. Mt Tam and the Marin Headlands Northbound (cliffside ocean view)
        3. Mt Diablo summit to Athenian School descent
        4. Skeggs Point
        5. Golden Gate to Black Sands Beach
        6. Mission Peak Mtb climb

        If you're into beaches then surfing is everywhere (I surf weekly so there's no shortage of spots). Skiing is all-time as well just ensure that you bring chains. Also, you have to leave at like 4am if you want to day trip it.

        Ok Pt 2 sorry. The one positive you list that is wrong is the nightlife. If you move to SF or frequent SF, you'll notice that nightlife is non-existent. Most of the city is closed by ~10pm - which neuters thw whole point of a 'city'. SF is more akin to a dense suburb sometimes. There are only a handful of clubs, bars, and restaurants that stay open later, mostly in north beach and adjacent areas.

        To your negatives:
        1. Yes, we have the highest cost of living, but the basket of goods is heavily tilted towards gas and housing. Rent is the biggest factor as there is a housing shortage. Driving to all the towns I mentioned prior, you'll quickly realize that the shortage is because of geography, boomer NIMBYs, greedy landlords, and moronic housing laws. Gas prices are also the highest in the nation due to gas taxes and more refining that is california-specific. Food isn't so bad - it is pricey but the Central Valley produces 25% of the nations food and about half the fruits and veggies. It is worth the price and you better learn to cook as you can find fantastic food.
        2. Yes we have high taxes. But if you're not a consumer it isn't that onerous. Stop spending money at restaurants - they will jack you for every last penny.
        3. Yes but you'll find quickly that the way out of it is money. The bay are is about money. Full stop. More money is less problems. Why? Because the bay area is an economic south africa. Drive around the hills of SF or the penninsula and you'll see it: wealth inequality can buy you out of even the most moronic governor or the most cracked-out homeless.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          1. My comp varies a lot year to year. I make low six figures base salary but there's a performance component that can be substantial in good years and almost negligible in bad years. Whether or not I do end up moving would *heavily* depend on whether or not I get offered a good job, or I can transfer internally at my current company (most likely option).

          2. Im not in debt and have a decent amount of saving and investments. I would prefer not to tap into these, but if it's necessary, I can.

          3. Alone, yes, and yes. I have relatives who live in San Jose. I don't see them often, but I am close with them.

          In short - you seem to have the money to survive here. If you can commit to growing your income and not get sucked into driving endlessly (i.e. you have to drive more than an hour one-way - which I had to at one point) then the bay area is fantastic. The one general thing I need to mention is that you should never "scrimp by". In this place, pinching pennies brings more problems than savings. If you try to save on rent, you'll live in the tenderloin, surrounded by crack addicts and ""youths"". Same with bayview, same with oakland, same with Richmond, same with San Bruno, same with East Palo Alto.

          Remember, the bay is an economic version of South Africa. You have gated enclaves of rich people, who can buy their way out of seeing anyone poor and any problem. Then you have the poor blighted areas which are dangerous if you're not careful.

          If you can barely afford it, you can't. You need to be comfy in your budget, don't compromise because you will land in a no-go zone and your problems will compound exponentially. Blowing up any savings you may have made.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            I just don’t understand why anyone would pay $3500 rent monthly to live in a 90 year old shitty apartment and step over hobos and feces daily. I’d rather make half as much to live away from all that

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              I will say this: it isn't a right-wing conspiracy. it is totally true. There are a lot of homeless people in the city center, homeless people under many bridges, addicts in each town. There are many downtown businesses closing, many people packing into smaller and smaller homes. Many people having to drive 2 hours one way because they can't afford anything nearby.

              But the alarmist media puts it out like the Bay Area is literally a L4D map. That the sky is always filled with smoke and homeless run the street like zombies. That sky scrapers are burning while families huddle in their homes to hide form radiation like in Metro 2033.

              The truth is that all this chaos is contained into the city downtowns. And while doomers will say (and I will agree with) that it is contained FOR NOW. As of now you can live in the bay area without having an encounter with any of the above. You live in an average neighborhood with no homeless, no feces, no nothing. All for an affordable price for your local wage.

              I live in SF at the top floor of an old 1920s house. i have a fully remodeled unit that I pay $2000 a month for a 700sqft 1bd with a garage.I earn ~$200K a year working just a standard manager role. I'm not a coder nor an entrepreneur. I'm a 26 years old office worker. This is completely affordable and is a great area to live in.

              Even in SF, I haven't seen a homeless person in over a month. I havent seen shit on the ground since I went downtown back in May. I know my neighbors and we had a halloween decoration session last weekend.

              That's what people not from the Bay don't get. Yes rent is the highest in the nation. So are the salaries. Look the bay is still a fantastic spot to live. It is so overblown how many people think SF is Afghanistan with a cool beach.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >SF is a great place to live in
                >500 square feet for $2k a month
                >In SF
                Hahahahahaha

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                How much house does a single person really need? 700 sqft is just my room, kitchen, living room, bathroom. that doesnt include my garage with a squat rack, the laundry room, and the backyard. All that for $100K in cash savings, not including investments

                Do you really need 2000sqft when it's just you and your gf? SF isn't where I would raise a family in the slightest. But OP is single and looking for work in a scenic area.

              • 7 months ago
                Anonymous

                >700 sqft
                That sounds like a cope. I can't imagine not having at least 1200sq ft to myself. Most people don't like being crammed into a pod

            • 7 months ago
              Anonymous

              Because you can save a ton of money and then retire very early in life.

  12. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >this whole post
    well you're clearly a homosexual so it might be the right move for you

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Haha

      He’s going to stick out like a sore thumb

  13. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Possibly the best cycling scene in America after Colorado (important to me)
    so like, not quite the worst in the world?

  14. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    You are everything wrong with the people who move here

    Stay in the Midwest homosexual
    We’re full

  15. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Leave your homosexual bike at home

    It’s the #1 way to out yourself as not being a local

  16. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    As an east coaster I lived in north county and San Diego for 1.5yrs.it’s pretty magical if you enjoy the beach, surf, outdoors, women. World class outdoors activities. You need money to have a good time but if you have that covered it’s awesome. I’m out in Chicago right now but want to move back long term. I don’t think the globohomosexual gov will be able to last forever in California as they face reality, brain drain, and a lot of angry residents. If I were forced to pick a state and never leave again it would be CA. If you’re not an outdoors person I think the cons start to get a lot heavier. Tbh you shouldn’t be allowed to live in a beach town if you don’t use the water. Fricking waste of space. I miss surfing bros.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thats what I'm thinking.

      There are some issues there that I don't think are going to go away for the foreseeable future (Taxes, Bureaucracy) but most of the issues that seem to be driving people away are very fixable. I cant image SF,SD,SJ will be deadling with the same problems 15 years from now. It's just a matter of political will.

  17. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Orange County is about 2 years from a rent/housing collapse. Half the tech jobs are going to be eliminated because AI can do it better. The minimum wage is going up to $20 an hour next year, so literally no one is going to be hiring entry level jobs. Everything will be outsourced.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >increasingly nervous wageoid who struggles with Excel tables predicts imminent tech jobs AI-pocalypse for the umpteenth time this month

  18. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    just dont.

  19. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    You need to be making ~200K+ to live comfortably, save for retirement, and leave some buffer.

    It may not make sense to buy a house here, ever. I was about to buy a million-dollar house, then crunched the numbers and found it's smarter to rent forever, at least until I have a spouse/kids and want yard/schools/etc.

    I don't even live in the Bay. I'm in the Sierra foothills. It's conservative here. Trump trucks everywhere, and the "rich" people don't have any education or class--they just got lucky their land is worth a lot now, and they own a roofing business that took off.

    Much of NorNorCal (real norcal) is very conservative. These places aren't homebuying areas either due to exorbitant/unobtainable home/fire insurance, etc.

    Basically plan to be a forever renter, plan to expend a lot of your income on COL expenses, and yes then you can enjoy the best climate/lifestyle factors that California offers. You have to pay to play out here, and you have to be in a good career as a minimum requirement.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      What does a 3 bedroom home go for up there?

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        About 800K+

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