TEFL

How easy is it to get a job in China or some other place in Asia doing TEFL? I'm about to graduate in a year with a BA in linguistics from a world top 40 university. I'll also get a CELTA before I start applying for jobs. I'm also a native English speaker. I have no "proper" work experience however. I'm asking because I'm a bit demoralised after trying to get a part time job in my own country but to no effect, even after sending out hundreds of applications. Will it be easier for me to get this kind of job?

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  1. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    Also I'm biracial (Anglo + Chinese). I heard that a lot of these places are very racist and select for "white" features when hiring. How true is this?

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/WgayCPB.png

      How easy is it to get a job in China or some other place in Asia doing TEFL? I'm about to graduate in a year with a BA in linguistics from a world top 40 university. I'll also get a CELTA before I start applying for jobs. I'm also a native English speaker. I have no "proper" work experience however. I'm asking because I'm a bit demoralised after trying to get a part time job in my own country but to no effect, even after sending out hundreds of applications. Will it be easier for me to get this kind of job?

      there was such a lot of demand that many cities were resorting to africans from english speaking countries to fill their positions, such as south africa and kenya. the parents were complaining at first but it is common now and just part of the system.
      most schools struggle to find teachers and so the claim that people are racist is only possible in high desirable locations like shanghai and beijing and then at top tier schools.
      >How easy is it to get a job in China or some other place in Asia doing TEFL?
      it will be easy. i would do a month long celta asap and apply asap and you could easily be teaching at the start of next years academic year.
      i have taught in china in private language school, public school and universities. i would encourage people to teach at universities as it provides the most interesting classes from your perspective, the most interesting students and experience and the best workload. you are talking to adults, albeit many are immature, instead of entertaining kids or dealing with tired teenagers.
      there are thousands of colleges and universities but you should try ti stick to Tier 1 and 2 cities, i would stick to ciites on this page
      https://www.yicaiglobal.com/news/hefei-foshan-enter-china-list-of-emerging-first-tier-cities

      • 12 months ago
        Anonymous

        I thought was difficult to get employed at universities.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        From what I've seen, universities pay absolute trash wages. It's fair for the minimal effort/hours you spend working but is there a way to get more hours and more salary? I'd prefer to work at a uni but I feel like unless you're a Thousand Talents traitor, it's unlikely. Especially since the schools charge low tuition.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          he'd unironically have a good amount of space in that cupboard if he threw out the trash that takes up 60% of the space

  2. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    There is a thread for this you dumb homosexual

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's super easy if you're not Asian looking. If you look Asian, you will have a bit tougher time. Parents expect to see a smiling white face when they drop their kids off. But with being a native speaker, a CELTA, and graduating from a recognized college, you'll be fine. You're overqualified, even for your first job. China visa process fricking sucks and is expensive as an American. Don't know where you're from. The turnover rate for TEFL is extremely high, so virtually every country is always hiring.

      Nah. I made that last thread and forgot to bump it before it 404'd. meh.

  3. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    You'll be fine, but don't set your heart on getting into China right now. Your ethnicity won't affect you - it won't be a bonus, but it's not a negative, assuming you hold a passport from an English speaking country. Speaking Chinese and working in China or Taiwan would be a bonus though.

  4. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Can I teach English easily in Thailand or Vietnam and make enough money to live the comfy cheap SEA life? I have a meme bachelor's degree but no certificate.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thailand maybe, but the salary is shit. Vietnam you can get paid a lot but you’ll make more if you have CELTA minimum

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        I can't do Vietnam with a meme online TEFL certificate? You're the first person I've seen day CELTA is necessary, not that that means you're wrong.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          He didn't say you need one, only that you'll get paid more if you have a CELTA or higher.
          That is sound logic for any country, but don't let it make you think you need anything special to get a good job *once you are in the country*. As this anon

          Not as easy as people make out.
          Looking online it seems that the golden age for TEFL was the late 2000s to early 2010s. There seemed to be far less bureaucracy and bs than there is today. COVID has changed things massively.

          I graduated with my BA a couple of years ago, plus got a groupon tefl cert. I had worked in shitty student jobs and that was my only work experience. I am white, in my 20s and English, so I thought I had a good shot at getting an offer.

          Firstly you literally need thousands of dollars, pounds etc. For the visa process, verification of certificates, medical checks. The costs are endless.

          Then there is the nightmare with references. I got a job offer from EF to work in Guangzhou china. They needed three references. I had one from a university tutor, but did not have another. They also needed a written reference on paper, with a signature for the visa.
          Despite saying I didn't need experience the visa required me to list three years work experience in teaching. The reference was also to confirm that experience. I thought about lying but was not keen, so didn't do it.

          Applied to an agency for hagwons in Korea and again was politely rejected. Told me to apply for EPIK (or some other thing can't remember) and I could apply through them. But turned them down

          I've considered getting a tourist visa to Thailand and then trying to get a job, then do a visa run, to get it upgraded to a work visa. But not sure if in 2023, that still works, or is even worth it. The salaries in thailand seem to be incredibly low paid and rent high.

          can confirm, it can be difficult to get a job when you're applying from your home country. Ask anyone who works in this industry and they'll tell you it's much easier to get a job when you're there and applying locally.
          Another truth is that people are rarely 100% happy with their first job. What happens is you arrive, work at your first gig for a while and realize it's not what you hoped or were told. So you start talking with other teachers, look up other schools/centers, send out feelers, etc. By your second year you'll either be in a better place, or you'll be ready to go home, or maybe change locations.
          You'll hear all types of stories in this industry. People who love their work and score comfy well-paying jobs. Others who drop it down to a gig to keep their visa, make other income streams and stroll into work to do a few hours teaching every day without ever letting it stress them. And sad sacks who do the same job for 20 years, feel trapped, but never apply to go somewhere else or learn a new skill. Some of this comes down to luck, good and bad, but generally it's people that make their own destiny, and don't let some sad sack try to convince you otherwise.

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Very helpful, thanks fren. I'm flying to Bangkok in June and my return ticket is for the end of July and I'm thinking I'll hit up Vietnam while I'm there so maybe I'll find a way to stay.

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            How many hours is CELTA and can I do it on my own time online whenever?

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              I don’t think you can do it online. It’s four weeks, five days a week. You can work part time evenings or something though while you do it.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                Right on. Maybe I'll see about doing this in Vietnam if I can find somebody who will hire me for doing it. I'm still in Burgerland right now. Leaving in a couple weeks.

  5. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not as easy as people make out.
    Looking online it seems that the golden age for TEFL was the late 2000s to early 2010s. There seemed to be far less bureaucracy and bs than there is today. COVID has changed things massively.

    I graduated with my BA a couple of years ago, plus got a groupon tefl cert. I had worked in shitty student jobs and that was my only work experience. I am white, in my 20s and English, so I thought I had a good shot at getting an offer.

    Firstly you literally need thousands of dollars, pounds etc. For the visa process, verification of certificates, medical checks. The costs are endless.

    Then there is the nightmare with references. I got a job offer from EF to work in Guangzhou china. They needed three references. I had one from a university tutor, but did not have another. They also needed a written reference on paper, with a signature for the visa.
    Despite saying I didn't need experience the visa required me to list three years work experience in teaching. The reference was also to confirm that experience. I thought about lying but was not keen, so didn't do it.

    Applied to an agency for hagwons in Korea and again was politely rejected. Told me to apply for EPIK (or some other thing can't remember) and I could apply through them. But turned them down

    I've considered getting a tourist visa to Thailand and then trying to get a job, then do a visa run, to get it upgraded to a work visa. But not sure if in 2023, that still works, or is even worth it. The salaries in thailand seem to be incredibly low paid and rent high.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Is Japan like this? Surely you can't fly in as a tourist without a visa and apply for one in-country?

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        In Japan you used to be able to come on a tourist visa/visa free and do all the work visa stuff in country. But too many morons kept coming with $1000 in their pocket and expected to make money instantly. They stopped allowing it 10~ years ago.

        What's been your experience with the visa process? Can you give me a timeline once you've secured a job offer?

        Not him, but Japan visa process is the easiest there is.

        I had a fake degree and fake language teaching certificates made in the philippines, applied to a job at a school in bangkok, and was accepted instantly and enthusiastically.

        I had a blast just fricking around with my students every day (4 hours a day 5 days a week). Thai kids are goofy as hell, but clever little frickers. We had some school curriculum but mostly was test prep, which only really took one month out of the school year.

        I really had no idea what I was doing, but nobody could tell that I was aware of, and was very popular. Some other farang showed up to teach at the school and was suspicious of me and kept asking me questions about what I had done in the states. He went behind my back to the staff and told them to investigate my credentials, and they told him to frick off because my students were doing well. LOL.

        based. your life sounds fun.

        My homies, can the Groupon certification get you a job? Google has a lot of people saying no. What's the final redpill here?

        Yes. Have shown tons of schools my groupon TEFL. They don't care where it's from. Just that you have one.

        I started working at a place that no longer exists (it shut during covid, but I was long gone when that happened). I had friends who worked at various English centers for about $2000-2500 USD month, and then they'd supplement by doing private lessons or teaching online. In Vietnam, you are probably teaching kids in your day job and teaching adults in your off hours. But I didn't like the afternoon and weekend hours because Vietnam is a country that is basically shuttered by 11pm (except for some redlight areas that stay open a few hours later).
        I found a school district that hired me for $1500/month, and that was fine by me because I only worked 5 hours a day and my evenings and weekends were free to focus on my other business and living a nice lifestyle. Public schools aren't for everyone - no airconditioning, the staff might not speak any English and you'll communicate through google translate, and if you're paired with a Vietnamese English teacher, you might not understand half of what they say. But the students are pretty good. Some bad ones who try to push you, but ignore them and focus on the students who want to learn. You'll come to a comfortable existence where you ride in, teach some vocab by playing games, and then you're done at 3 or 4pm and the rest of the day is yours. Some of the students are really bright and already semi-fluent from living online, but their teachers don't realize it because the students don't know any of the formal grammar rules that language studies always focus on. You can make a big difference in their lives by encouraging them and being positive. I preferred that over teaching the richer kids in private English centers.

        Did you work at APAX. That's the only place that comes to mind that closed during covid.

        https://i.imgur.com/oVBQ1VL.jpg

        I know it's a newbie question, but are the lesson plans provided when you TEFL or are you supposed to organize the whole thing yourself?
        Also, is standard TEFL enough or is it better to get a CELTA like OP, too (or some other additional certification)?

        Generally no. Lesson plans are not provided. I did a gig in Japan that had no curriculum, lesson plans, class roster, nothing. We had very few supplies. Sucked a lot. Just make sure a school has a curriculum, text books, teacher guides, etc.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          A lot of small centers closed during covid. APAX stopped paying a lot of their employees but they still have centers up and running. The guy who runs it, Shark Thuy, has a lot of connections.

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Sounds like I should avoid them?

  6. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    How hard is it to get jobs at international schools in SEA? I have a teaching degree, but no experience outside of subbing and my practicum experience.

  7. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    is this tefl general?
    anyone else scheduled to be teaching somewhere soon? I'll be in france in about five months

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      It is now I guess.

      Incoming JET, haven't received my placement yet. Spending the majority of my free time grinding Japanese.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        What's been your experience with the visa process? Can you give me a timeline once you've secured a job offer?

  8. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not TEFL specifically, but could I still get jobs at foreign unis with an MA, or do I need to get a PhD?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      I think it’s the same as in America. In other words, it depends on the job. You don’t need a graduate degree to get most administration jobs. You will for some administration jobs. You will for all faculty jobs.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      I think it’s the same as in America. In other words, it depends on the job. You don’t need a graduate degree to get most administration jobs. You will for some administration jobs. You will for all faculty jobs.

      Sorry. I just realized you asked about MA vs PhD and not BA vs MA/PhD. I really don’t know the answer to the question. I suppose it depends on the country, the college, and the subject for faculty. For administration, you probably don’t even need an MA let alone a PhD.

  9. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    If I apply to shit in person while I'm overseas do I need to bring my original copy of my degree for them or will a picture do? A friend was just telling me I'd need the original but that sounds moronic.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >If I apply to shit in person while I'm overseas do I need to bring my original copy of my degree for them or will a picture do? A friend was just telling me I'd need the original but that sounds moronic.
      It really depends on the country. If you don't know where you'll end up, I'd just make a high-quality color scan of your degree. I still use the same scan I made 15+ years ago for most of my visa applications. But I did need to get an apostille of my degree when I worked in Vietnam, and South Korea needs them now too (but I didn't need one back when I worked there). For Vietnam, I arranged for someone to mail my degree for an apostille in my home country and then DHL the apostille to me. I used the apostille and a printout of my degree to get my visa in Vietnam.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >apostille
        I don't even know what this is so I'll have to read up but Vietnam is what I had in mind. So you're saying the scan won't do?

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          An apostille is a document from an agency/ministry in your home country that certifies your degree is legit. You might also need a Vietnamese translation of your apostille, which will need to be done by a translator recommended by the Vietnamese embassy in your home country. Since this shit needs to be done in your home country, if it turns out to be necessary, I recommend you leave your degree with a trusted family member or friend because this stuff has to be done in your home country, and if you have your original degree with you, you'll need to ship it back (or return with it). You could instead get your friend/family to FedEx your degree to get it apostilled, and then the apostille to get it translated, and then DHL the documents back to you in Vietnam.
          You'll also need a background check to work in Vietnam, and this should technically be apostilled and translated too. But if you are already in the country, you probably just need a local police check. (That's all I needed.)

          What's the cheapest/easiest TEFL cert that they'll accept there btw? Would they let me get certified as I worked, if I had a college degree?

          Get an online Groupon cert and do it over a weekend. That's all you need. You might need to get it apostilled too. Full Circle TEFL is based in the UK and they have an agency that goes an apostille for about 100 quid. If necessary, you have that apostille shipped to your home country (if outside the UK) and then translated by the same translator the Vietnamese embassy wanted you to use for your degree.
          Sounds all complicated, right? Don't stress it too much. Just bring a scan of your degree with you. Get an offer of employment, let your employer sort out what documents you'll need. If the employer greases the right palms, you won't need all the documents the various websites say you do.

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Oh yeah so what are the best places to teach in Vietnam, in terms of demand and pay?

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              I started working at a place that no longer exists (it shut during covid, but I was long gone when that happened). I had friends who worked at various English centers for about $2000-2500 USD month, and then they'd supplement by doing private lessons or teaching online. In Vietnam, you are probably teaching kids in your day job and teaching adults in your off hours. But I didn't like the afternoon and weekend hours because Vietnam is a country that is basically shuttered by 11pm (except for some redlight areas that stay open a few hours later).
              I found a school district that hired me for $1500/month, and that was fine by me because I only worked 5 hours a day and my evenings and weekends were free to focus on my other business and living a nice lifestyle. Public schools aren't for everyone - no airconditioning, the staff might not speak any English and you'll communicate through google translate, and if you're paired with a Vietnamese English teacher, you might not understand half of what they say. But the students are pretty good. Some bad ones who try to push you, but ignore them and focus on the students who want to learn. You'll come to a comfortable existence where you ride in, teach some vocab by playing games, and then you're done at 3 or 4pm and the rest of the day is yours. Some of the students are really bright and already semi-fluent from living online, but their teachers don't realize it because the students don't know any of the formal grammar rules that language studies always focus on. You can make a big difference in their lives by encouraging them and being positive. I preferred that over teaching the richer kids in private English centers.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                Public school does sound more personality rewarding by your description. Maybe I could check in Da Lat where no AC wouldn't be a big deal. I have a hard-on for Da Lat anyway even though I haven't visited the country yet.

                From start to finish, it took maybe two weeks. I remember there being some "expedited fees" and the whole process cost a few hundred dollars, including getting the documents shipped around.

                I'm currently driving across the country to my mom's house which is where I'm flying out to Bangkok from, and I'll have a few days there before I leave, so I'll see if I can get the ball rolling and leave the rest in her hands, but it looks like step 1 is getting it notorized by the university? I'm so confused right now.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                You can get the original degree apostilled [an apostille stamp on the back] or get a notarized copy of your degree apostilled. You only need to get a degree (or notarized copy of it) apostilled once and it's considered certified forever. It's up to you if you want to use a notarized copy or the original degree, but I think you still need to submit the original degree when you apply for your work visa.
                If your university can apostille your degree for you (the rules vary from government to government who exactly can apostille something), then get it done by them, and it's good to save you from doing that step later.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                BTW, if your university has a department that deals with notarizing/apostilles, just tell them what you want to do. They'll have experience knowing what steps to do, and it will save you a lot of time and possibly money to go through them.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                Wish I'd known about this before I left. I'm having this conversation from a hotel room mid-trip. Still a good idea to call them though. I'd assume they have somebody.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                Well shit I have my original with me so I will see if I can get the apostille in person then? My mom's in the Chicago area and searching apostille on Google maps yields several results. Then I could just bring that b***h on the plane and save shipping costs but I guess if the translation also needs to be done in the US then I may not have time. I guess this would be easier if, like you say, I waited to have a prospective employer to walk me through it, but it seems ultimately better to be ready in advance if I can figure it out.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                Wish I'd known about this before I left. I'm having this conversation from a hotel room mid-trip. Still a good idea to call them though. I'd assume they have somebody.

                The translation part is the tricky one because the Vietnamese embassy will want you to use a certain agency, and you can't get that ball rolling without a job offer. Their rules are whack, and I think they've become even stricter since I was there. Certain steps need to be done within the country the degree/certificate was issued, so you would need to send it back to the US to have them done.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                So I guess I should just get the apostille, leave it with my mom awaiting further instructions, and just go over there with the color scan to start?

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            How long does the apostille take? Sorry for so many questions but you're just being so damn helpful here.

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              From start to finish, it took maybe two weeks. I remember there being some "expedited fees" and the whole process cost a few hundred dollars, including getting the documents shipped around.

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              My diploma in English teaching features a number on it, any potential employer can go to a website, type in that number, and check to see that the diploma is real. I thought this solution was standard?

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            >An apostille is a document from an agency/ministry in your home country that certifies your degree is legit.
            Bad misinformation. Apostilles do not certify anything other than the notary who stamped your documents. They do not check with the issuing institution to verify your documents.

            With any legalization process, the only person verifying the integrity of your documents is you (under penalty of perjury).

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        What's the cheapest/easiest TEFL cert that they'll accept there btw? Would they let me get certified as I worked, if I had a college degree?

  10. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I had a fake degree and fake language teaching certificates made in the philippines, applied to a job at a school in bangkok, and was accepted instantly and enthusiastically.

    I had a blast just fricking around with my students every day (4 hours a day 5 days a week). Thai kids are goofy as hell, but clever little frickers. We had some school curriculum but mostly was test prep, which only really took one month out of the school year.

    I really had no idea what I was doing, but nobody could tell that I was aware of, and was very popular. Some other farang showed up to teach at the school and was suspicious of me and kept asking me questions about what I had done in the states. He went behind my back to the staff and told them to investigate my credentials, and they told him to frick off because my students were doing well. LOL.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Some other farang showed up to teach at the school and was suspicious of me and kept asking me questions about what I had done in the states. He went behind my back to the staff and told them to investigate my credentials, and they told him to frick off because my students were doing well. LOL.
      Wow, what a little homosexual. I guess there's no escaping American busybodies wherever you go. Even on this board.

  11. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    My homies, can the Groupon certification get you a job? Google has a lot of people saying no. What's the final redpill here?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >My homies, can the Groupon certification get you a job? Google has a lot of people saying no. What's the final redpill here?
      I've used my groupon cert for countries that require a TEFL and never had a problem with it.

  12. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I know it's a newbie question, but are the lesson plans provided when you TEFL or are you supposed to organize the whole thing yourself?
    Also, is standard TEFL enough or is it better to get a CELTA like OP, too (or some other additional certification)?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      I don't know shit either and will let somebody else answer what's better than what, but it looks like CELTA needs to be in person. 120 hour TEFL seems to be standard and can be done online at your own pace. As far as what doors you'd be opening with higher level shit, I won't pretend to know.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I know it's a newbie question, but are the lesson plans provided when you TEFL or are you supposed to organize the whole thing yourself?
      Depends on where you work. Some places you follow a detailed lesson plan down to the minute, others give you a more general outline, and some you plan everything yourself. It's a good question to ask in interviews but don't let it be your first question.

      My diploma in English teaching features a number on it, any potential employer can go to a website, type in that number, and check to see that the diploma is real. I thought this solution was standard?

      >My diploma in English teaching features a number on it, any potential employer can go to a website, type in that number, and check to see that the diploma is real. I thought this solution was standard?
      Apostille isn't for employers, it's for government employees who don't speak English, deal mostly in actual papers, and the concept predates the Internet.

      In Japan you used to be able to come on a tourist visa/visa free and do all the work visa stuff in country. But too many morons kept coming with $1000 in their pocket and expected to make money instantly. They stopped allowing it 10~ years ago.
      [...]
      Not him, but Japan visa process is the easiest there is.
      [...]
      based. your life sounds fun.
      [...]
      Yes. Have shown tons of schools my groupon TEFL. They don't care where it's from. Just that you have one.
      [...]
      Did you work at APAX. That's the only place that comes to mind that closed during covid.
      [...]
      Generally no. Lesson plans are not provided. I did a gig in Japan that had no curriculum, lesson plans, class roster, nothing. We had very few supplies. Sucked a lot. Just make sure a school has a curriculum, text books, teacher guides, etc.

      >Did you work at APAX. That's the only place that comes to mind that closed during covid.
      Yes, that was my first in Vietnam. It wasn't bad back in the day, but I heard about all their bullshit during covid and it didn't surprise me.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >It's a good question to ask in interviews but don't let it be your first question.
        What should be my first question? I interview like absolute shit but I'm told these people will hire anybody.

  13. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Alright bros, what specific places should I apply in Vietnam with my meme liberal arts degree and my Groupon TEFL cert? I'm going to be in the country so point me somewhere, what city and what school or center should I visit?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      If I was in your position with no leads, I would do the usual on-the-ground work: Google, eslcafe, and maybe google maps to compile a list. Update resume with VN telephone number and street address (I wouldn't put a Le Thanh Ton address in Saigon even if that's where I'm staying). My cover/intro would say I'm in the country, love Vietnam, love teaching, excited to find a job, etc. Then a combination of emailed resumes (or website applications for the big chains) and follow-up calls and/or drop-in visits.
      Start with your top choices because calls, visits and interviews can eat up a lot of time. Also start as soon as you get there because you want to get as far in the process you can while in the country, depending on your travel plans.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        I thought you guys said getting these jobs was easy but this makes it sound pretty hard.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          You wanna try something hard? Try getting a code monkey job with no experience these days, even with a CS degree.

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Try getting a code monkey job
            No thanks bro. I am one person you will NOT need to compete with for those jobs.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I wouldn't put a Le Thanh Ton address in Saigon even if that's where I'm staying
        Is this the coomer district or something?

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >love teaching
        >love Vietnam
        >excited to get a job
        And into the trash it goes.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          Explain?

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Maybe things like:
            >experience
            >qualifications
            >achievements
            >specialisations
            ?

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              I don't have any of those except a bachelor's degree and I'm going to get a Groupon TEFL cert to start with.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Groupon TEFL
                Wew, imagine hiring someone who obviously doesn't give a frick.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                But lots of people in this general say they got hired with it.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                If you don't have a CELTA, you're not a serious ESL teacher, tbh. I've no idea how dancing monkeys with Groupon """certificates""" can take themselves seriously.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                You're right, and unless you pay 200 000 dollars per semester for a Harvard or Yale degree, you're not really a graduate in anything, now, are you? It's not like there are any other people or institutions in the world that could potentially teach you how to teach language. Impossible.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >You're right, and unless you pay 200 000 dollars per semester for a Harvard or Yale degree, you're not really a graduate in anything, now, are you?
                Now you're getting it, pleb.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                You're replying to someone who never has and probably never will do TEFL. Don't help trolls shit up threads by replying to them.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                (You)

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Accuses someone of being clueless
                >Still calls it TEFL
                >Supporting a guy who thinks Groupon is a suitable place to launch a career.
                What an absolute state.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >career

                Fricking hell...

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            I don't have any of those except a bachelor's degree and I'm going to get a Groupon TEFL cert to start with.

            Ignore that salty kid. He's sure he's smarter than everyone else and he's pissed life hasn't rewarded him for it. You'll unfortunately meet your share of them in TEFL. On here, he seeks validation through (You)s. Don't give him any and he'll find other threads to troll.

            >I wouldn't put a Le Thanh Ton address in Saigon even if that's where I'm staying
            Is this the coomer district or something?

            It's runs along Japan Town, which turns into a redlight district at night.

  14. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is Apollo good to work for? What about ILA?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Both fine to work for if you’re just off your CELTA. Avoid VUS and WSE. APAX too of course.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        Thanks buddy. I'm thinking of getting my CELTA from Apollo in Hanoi or HCMC because they'll do a partial reimbursement if you work for them for a year, so that's nice to hear. I think ILA has a similar training program so if you or anybody has any particular insight into which might be better, or if they're more or less the same, that would be nice to know.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          School which invest in professional development for their teachers are generally the best places to work. Check that through the year there's training sessions, too. CELTA + 1 year experience teaching + lots of mini top up sessions = ezpz finding work in the world afterwards; you'll actually have a clue what to speak about in interviews, and you'll be ready to start studying for DELTA module 1.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          I know people who’ve taught at both and managed centers. I’d say they’re both fine. You’ll probably get paid a decent $2k a month salary. The only thing is you’ll likely be teaching kids which might be challenging.

          School which invest in professional development for their teachers are generally the best places to work. Check that through the year there's training sessions, too. CELTA + 1 year experience teaching + lots of mini top up sessions = ezpz finding work in the world afterwards; you'll actually have a clue what to speak about in interviews, and you'll be ready to start studying for DELTA module 1.

          I’d recommend waiting at least two years before going into the DELTA. It can be a lot to get through and getting an MA, especially for work permits in Vietnam, is the better option imo

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            >You’ll probably get paid a decent $2k a month salary.
            This is higher than what I've read about their average pay but maybe not all of those people have CELTAs?

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              Not sure but it could be that not everyone there is full time (20 hrs a week). 1,800-2,000 is about what you can make to start. Can double that pretty easy though if you get an MA, if you want to go on that career path.

  15. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >B. You have a group of adult beginner students. You want to teach them ‘Would you like….?’, as in ‘Would you like a cup of coffee?’ How would you teach this? How would you introduce the phrase into the lesson and what would you do to ensure that students understand the meaning of “Would you like …”?
    This is a question on my little pre-interview assignment for CELTA class and I'm not sure how to answer. Every other question makes sense but can anybody help with this one? I've never taught before so I imagine this is the kind of thing that the training itself would help with.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Language analysis:
      "Would you like [something]?" = a functional phrase which is used for "offering". Do not look at 'would', 'you' and 'like' as separate words; treat them as a set phrase, glued together in quotation marks.

      To teach it, think to yourself: when in life would you ever say this to someone? Imagine all the situations you might offer something to someone. The first things which come to mind are when I have guests at home, or maybe a waiter in a restaurant offering me something more.

      A good way to teach 'functional phrases' (i.e. phrases to get shit done) is to demonstrate an example of them in use, before analysing the language, then getting students to repeat the role play.

      First Part - Generating Context & Establishing Meaning
      >1. Draw a picture of a house, with 2 people inside sitting at a table
      >2. Elicit from students: "where is it?" (Answer: house) & "who is it?" (friends)
      >3. Put a speech bubble next to one person with "Would you like a coffee?"
      >4. Put a speech bubble next to the other person with "Yes, please :)", and "No, thank you.".
      >5. Demo a roleplay with students where you offering them drinks "Hey Bob, would you like a coffee?" (gesture to board to repeat one of the 2). If he says yes, pretend to make a coffee, then give him a cup and say "Here you go". (Write this on the board).
      >6. Run around different students in a dramatic fashion offering them drinks - they'll pick up the meaning.

      >Part 2 - Establishing Form
      >1. Draw a grid on the board with 2 columns and 8 rows. The first column will contain pictures of 8 drinks. The second column will have 'pluses' and 'minuses'.
      >2. For row 1, imagine there's a beer and a plus sign. Elicit: "would you like a beer? yes, please!" and write the example on the board.
      >3. Give them 2 minutes to write the other sentences in their notebooks.Walk around and help
      >4. Let them check their work together in pairs
      >5. Check answers and write good sentences on board.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        Part Three - Practising Pron
        >1. Now you're satisfied they know what you're trying to teach them, and they've written shit down, you can move to speaking
        >2. Say the sentence slowly and ask students to listen
        >3. Tap out the rhythm of the sentence WOULD you LIKE a BEER? (Revise sentence stress for more details). Also highlight that WOULD you -> Wodzhuh and LIKE a -> Laika. I.e. we say something more like "WUDzhuh LIKuh BEER"
        >4. Don't explain the above, just make it very obvious what you're saying
        >5. Start getting them to repeat from the very back. You say "BEER", they repeat. You say "LIE kuh BEER", they repeat. You say "WOOD zhuh LIE kuh BEER", they repeat.
        >6. Nominate studens individually. You say and then they repeat the whole sentence, give help where needed.
        >7. Change up the noun, so you say "Would you like a coffee?" and they repeat. Do whole class first, then individual. Eventually just point to symbols on the board, then a student and get them to say the sentence
        >8. Keep the energy lively and fun like you're a showman, when the energy sags, praise them and move on.

        Practising the Language
        >1. Get a student to come to front. Give them a flashcard with a drink on it. Get them to say "Would you like a x?" You say "yes please", or "no thanks" in a dramatic fashion to make them laugh. Get the other student to mimic making a drink and saying "here you are". Do something like "mmmmmm" or "uugghhh" after pretending to taste it.
        >2 Replace yourself with another student and get them to do the roleplay
        >3. Get students into pairs and give them flashcards with drinks on. Get them to practice the roleplay together.

        Feedback
        >1 Go around and write ntoes on mistakes they're making. Write them on the board
        >2 At end of activity, ask them in pairs to discuss how to correct the shitty sentences
        >3 Nominate students to come to board and correct them

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          Extended Practice (Drama)
          >1. Draw a picture of a situation on the board (i.e. 2 friends in a bar)
          >2 Elicit where they are, elicit vocabulary connected to the situation (drunk, beer, barman, stool - students should always be writing this new emergent vocab)
          >3 Demo a roleplay where you play both characters. "Would you like a beer?" "Yeah, sure!".... "Would you like a vodka?" ... "y-y-yeah sure.. "would you like some moonshine?"... "y--yy-yyy-eahh suuree" [falls off stool].
          >4 Give pairs all different situations like "friends in a bar", "grandma keeping offering you food", "a shitty date", etc. If they're strong you might want to throw in language like "Would you like another" or "Would you like more"
          >5. Give pairs 3 minutes to plan a small sketch and practice.
          >6 students perform, feedback, etc

          Note: "would you like [something]?" (offer) is slightly different to "would you like [to do something" (invitation).

          Note: you'd probably want to do this lessona fter having studied types of food or drink (for offers), or after having studied collocations for shit to do around town (invitiations - would you like to watch a movie, would you like to hit the bar, ec).

          With functional language you can't go wrong with setting up a situation with a shitty pic on the board to generate context, acting it out, analysing the language and getting them to write out examples, before practising a limited example and then making things more creative and dramatic to cap off the lesson. Ideally with some new vocab to practice to 'slot in' the phrase.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        Part Three - Practising Pron
        >1. Now you're satisfied they know what you're trying to teach them, and they've written shit down, you can move to speaking
        >2. Say the sentence slowly and ask students to listen
        >3. Tap out the rhythm of the sentence WOULD you LIKE a BEER? (Revise sentence stress for more details). Also highlight that WOULD you -> Wodzhuh and LIKE a -> Laika. I.e. we say something more like "WUDzhuh LIKuh BEER"
        >4. Don't explain the above, just make it very obvious what you're saying
        >5. Start getting them to repeat from the very back. You say "BEER", they repeat. You say "LIE kuh BEER", they repeat. You say "WOOD zhuh LIE kuh BEER", they repeat.
        >6. Nominate studens individually. You say and then they repeat the whole sentence, give help where needed.
        >7. Change up the noun, so you say "Would you like a coffee?" and they repeat. Do whole class first, then individual. Eventually just point to symbols on the board, then a student and get them to say the sentence
        >8. Keep the energy lively and fun like you're a showman, when the energy sags, praise them and move on.

        Practising the Language
        >1. Get a student to come to front. Give them a flashcard with a drink on it. Get them to say "Would you like a x?" You say "yes please", or "no thanks" in a dramatic fashion to make them laugh. Get the other student to mimic making a drink and saying "here you are". Do something like "mmmmmm" or "uugghhh" after pretending to taste it.
        >2 Replace yourself with another student and get them to do the roleplay
        >3. Get students into pairs and give them flashcards with drinks on. Get them to practice the roleplay together.

        Feedback
        >1 Go around and write ntoes on mistakes they're making. Write them on the board
        >2 At end of activity, ask them in pairs to discuss how to correct the shitty sentences
        >3 Nominate students to come to board and correct them

        Extended Practice (Drama)
        >1. Draw a picture of a situation on the board (i.e. 2 friends in a bar)
        >2 Elicit where they are, elicit vocabulary connected to the situation (drunk, beer, barman, stool - students should always be writing this new emergent vocab)
        >3 Demo a roleplay where you play both characters. "Would you like a beer?" "Yeah, sure!".... "Would you like a vodka?" ... "y-y-yeah sure.. "would you like some moonshine?"... "y--yy-yyy-eahh suuree" [falls off stool].
        >4 Give pairs all different situations like "friends in a bar", "grandma keeping offering you food", "a shitty date", etc. If they're strong you might want to throw in language like "Would you like another" or "Would you like more"
        >5. Give pairs 3 minutes to plan a small sketch and practice.
        >6 students perform, feedback, etc

        Note: "would you like [something]?" (offer) is slightly different to "would you like [to do something" (invitation).

        Note: you'd probably want to do this lessona fter having studied types of food or drink (for offers), or after having studied collocations for shit to do around town (invitiations - would you like to watch a movie, would you like to hit the bar, ec).

        With functional language you can't go wrong with setting up a situation with a shitty pic on the board to generate context, acting it out, analysing the language and getting them to write out examples, before practising a limited example and then making things more creative and dramatic to cap off the lesson. Ideally with some new vocab to practice to 'slot in' the phrase.

        That's a great plan, but is this level of complexity really necessary? I don't know how well Asians receive English, in EE you'd spend maybe 10 minutes on that tbh
        (not the anon you replied to btw)

        I know people who’ve taught at both and managed centers. I’d say they’re both fine. You’ll probably get paid a decent $2k a month salary. The only thing is you’ll likely be teaching kids which might be challenging.
        [...]
        I’d recommend waiting at least two years before going into the DELTA. It can be a lot to get through and getting an MA, especially for work permits in Vietnam, is the better option imo

        Not sure but it could be that not everyone there is full time (20 hrs a week). 1,800-2,000 is about what you can make to start. Can double that pretty easy though if you get an MA, if you want to go on that career path.

        Does a Master's make that much of a difference? I'm thinking about getting into a teaching programme this year rather than getting a CELTA

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          If it's truly an A1 lesson, then you'd wanna be spending time on it.
          People struggle with speaking, so you need to build up to them being able to speak independently.
          Just "covering it" with some gay ass questions doesn't really do shit. "Understanding" a language isn't enough; there has to be a skill you're actually practicing.
          When I was teaching total beginner (except alphabet) in Russia, i absolutely needed to spend ages on such basic things. They fricking love it when they realize they've spent a good 10 minutes actually speaking, half of that without any assistance.
          When you've done a few well structured lessons like this, you'll loosen the students up, too. They'll feel there's logic and outcomes, and will get used to being more daring.
          Then there's pronunciation; the most overlooked aspect of English. If you're not focusing on this, you'll frick up both their listening and speaking, and if you're not giving them time to practice speaking, you'll never be able to give feedback.

          Course book grinds and whirlwinding topics only gives off a fake sense of progress in language learning.

          Always think to yourself : what can learners do (unassisted) at the end of this lesson, which they couldn't have done before? And also, what evidence do you have of this? If you can think of this in terms of systems (grammar, lexis, pron, discourse) and skills (reading, listęning, speaking, writing), and grade output against criteria then you're cooking with gas.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          CELTA is a good starting point so I’d go with that first. An MA is more of a long-term investment

  16. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Wassup bros? I just came to Thailand with no job. What's the best place to teach English here?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Black person. probably should have done some research before going. good luck.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        I did, and the research said it was easier to get jobs in country. So here I am. Why would you be so hostile?

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          >whats the best place to teach english
          obviously not enough research. anyways, unironically check reddit

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            >check reddit
            >unironically
            Pick one.

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            >nooooo you can't ask questions related to the topic of the general in the general
            >also btw I'm a redditor and you should be a redditor too

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              No the anon you replied to, but chill.
              Obviously it's easier to get jobs while in the country you intend to work in, but it's due to employers knowing they have less paperwork, less hassle, and being able to meet you right away. It's not "go there and see how it goes," you fricked up.

              >whats the best place to teach english
              obviously not enough research. anyways, unironically check reddit

              TEFL reddits have a wealth of information that's available right away instead of waiting for an anon to help you out. Find schools and agencies in Thailand on their lists, and you'll be set to go right away. It's not about "muh website culture" it's about accessing information.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >It's not about "muh website culture" it's about accessing information.
                Sounds like something a redditor would say. Memes aside though, I've literally never browsed Reddit except when Google pointed me there for video game shit a few times.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Memes aside though, I've literally never browsed Reddit except when Google pointed me there for video game shit a few times.
                NTA but to survive in this world you need to ignore the opinions of people you've never met and learn to do your own research. That means getting information wherever you can find it.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          Lmfao moron thats not research
          >reeee spoonfeed me I'm a dumb little homosexual!
          How about no

  17. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    What's 2300 RMB plus 5000 RMB for accommodation like? This is an offer for a uni job in Dalian. I'm a licenced teacher with an MA.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      What? Did you miss a number? 2300 is terrible.

      >It's not about "muh website culture" it's about accessing information.
      Sounds like something a redditor would say. Memes aside though, I've literally never browsed Reddit except when Google pointed me there for video game shit a few times.

      >check reddit
      >unironically
      Pick one.

      https://i.imgur.com/rBo7a45.gif

      >nooooo you can't ask questions related to the topic of the general in the general
      >also btw I'm a redditor and you should be a redditor too

      reddit is a great place for instant information regarding semi niche stuff like this. so instead of having anon wait for a response since he claimed to be already in Thailand, I recommended reddit. Get over it.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >What? Did you miss a number? 2300 is terrible.
        oh. yeah. I meant 23000

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          That offer is great since most uni jobs are comfy as frick. How many teaching hours do you have a week? 12? No office hours too I'm guessing?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      garbage - pick one of the T2 cities around shanghai or guangzhou, you could be getting around 40k+ with a licence

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        should have said that it's a good salary for a uni but you could be getting much more at a private high school

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        should have said that it's a good salary for a uni but you could be getting much more at a private high school

        Kek. May the best man win, samegay. You don't seem so smart btw

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          yeah replying to myself to add info is "samegay", kys

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            lel. samegay triggered

  18. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >every single time I fail at the interview because I have an accent
    Fricking hell, and I am not even from india or a shithole country

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      They need somebody who speaks native English, not some larping bobblehead mixing his mudbabble in with it.

  19. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone got Chongqing experience? I have an interview coming up. I chose the city because it's huge but few foreigners so JBW will be strong there. It also looks cool af.

  20. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Do any CELTAgays here have any advice on whether I should do my certification with IH in Chiang Mai or with Apollo in Hanoi or HCMC?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      IH is better reknowned but no-one gives a frick where it came from. Pick the place not the training center

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        Any idea which of those cities is better to teach in, then? I'm not normally a big ass megacity kind of guy but I haven't been to Vietnam yet. I'm currently in Chiang Mai and this town is cool even if it's got a lot of douchebags in it.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          HCMC is definitely better. Hanoi is more conservative and boring.
          >don't like massive cities
          It's really safe unlike most megacities and the women are considered by SE Asians, the finest in SEA. Plus you're surrounded by potential tradwives
          Chiang Mai is nice too but touristy snd full of digital douchebags

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          >a lot of douchebags in it.
          tell us more

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Bali and Chiang Mai are the digital nomad and youtuber capitals. I like to live in real cities not one's where the foreigners are the economy. I like how it feels to live in real cities.

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Hipsters, loud morons, people who look like they're from Jersey Shore, just a lot of lower tier farangs of all kinds. I was expecting more hippies here, which I tend to like, but they must be somewhere else.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              My homies, I got accepted to CELTA class.

  21. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Get into another country with residence then look for private students. Get a masters degree (or make it up lol), some certification in teaching, child psychology and development, and you can end up working for affluent families who will actually pay you a good salary on top of housing. That is the real top of tutoring/esl jobs, working at schools and hagwons is the bottom for people who can't do anything else.

    Plus it's a lot nicer when you don't have groups of kids who don't want to be there, but you go to their home and they are happy to see you and chat about their life. You bond with them and they feel comfortable because they are at home already.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      doubt it's something you can do in a white country though

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      i knew a chick who dropped out of JET because "it was too difficult" and "sexism" and went to be an english teaching nanny in spain.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Au pairs are all bawds. If you ever see a Euro girl on Tinder in small town America, chances are she's an au pair. Anecdotally, I know a Colombian camprostitute who's gonna be an au pair for an Italian family in Sardinia.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          What the frick even is an au pair?

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            >What the frick even is an au pair?
            eat fruit you anemic frick

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            An au pair is a young woman who lives with a family rent-free and babysits the kids and does chores, in exchange for a stipend. Basically what we would refer to as a maid and a governess one hundred years ago, combined into one role.

            The term comes from the French phrase that doesn't have a word-for-word translation in English, but it basically refers to her position as a peer of the family. Historically, domestic workers were seen as "below" the people they worked for, but an au pair is meant to live as a peer of the family, their equal basically, like another daughter.

            Young women do this to travel and take a gap year after high school or college. They even have their own class of visa in Burgerstan. Girls really do have life on easy mode. All you need to travel the world for free is to be born with a pussy and a European passport. They're basically allowed to NEET in another person's house in exchange for watching the kids and doing light chores. It's also gaining traction among young women in Latin America.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              Why can't guys do it?

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                Why the frick would you want a random guy coming to your house, to try to frick your wife and female relatives, when you can have a pretty young thing to have as eye candy instead?

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                Discriminating based on sex is illegal in the US.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                You need to be 18 to post here. Knock it off until your balls drop.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                He's right, it's illegal. You shouldn't suggest illegal things here.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                I wasn't suggesting anything illegal. I was merely trying to describe the thought process of dads hiring nannies. I'm not a father and would never discriminate against protected classes when making hiring decisions under US law, because I enjoy not getting sued.

  22. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've applied for a great job in china. After my inquiry they responded with the worst broken english I have ever seen. Is this normal in china, or they want to scam me?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Why won't the rest of the world speak English to me bros???

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