The 3 phase theory of expat/moving experience

It is theorized that people go through 3 phases when they visit a country with a different culture
>Phase 1: "Honeymoon period" Complete pelasure and amazement. Everything's positive
>Phase 2: "Culture shock" Realization of the bad stuff and subconcious comparison with one own's country. Most stuff seems negative
>Phase 3: "Adaptation" Acceptance that theres both good and bad in a country, and no place is perfect
Have you gone through these phases when travelling abroad?
Do you agree with this theory?
If you're staying abroad from your own country, what phase would you consider yourself to be?

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Have you gone through these phases when travelling abroad?
    Yes
    >Do you agree with this theory?
    Sometimes. Length of stay is a key factor, but there are many other cultural elements at play.
    >If you're staying abroad from your own country, what phase would you consider yourself to be?
    I do not transition. I treat every country like it's the last time I'll ever visit, and show as much fucking respect as possible to the local population without getting scammed myself. The exception is the U.S. because I live here, with the only 3 states/places I've ever treated this way being Wyoming, Hawaii, and Washington DC.

    Death to Kansas.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    > Have you gone through these phases when travelling abroad? Do you agree with this theory?
    Sort of. I live in an extremely (high-end/corporate) expat milieu, in Switzerland, and around here I have heard it phrased as, “For the first six months you feel like you’re on vacation, for the next six months you complain about Swiss people. Then everything is normal.” But I actually make a point of taking small moments of pleasure in just walking around and appreciating things, even now, years into my stay.
    >If you're staying abroad from your own country, what phase would you consider yourself to be?
    Again, it’s sort of a mix. Some things infuriate, others enchant, most are ordinary. I try to make a point to enjoy the good bits as much as I can.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Have you gone through these phases when travelling abroad?
    Yeah, for Taiwan.
    >Do you agree with this theory?
    Not really, because it's too basic a concept. It's like saying "rain is due to a phenomenon in the universe causing it". It's technically true, but your statement yields no meaningful information. This is just classic behavior when in a challenging situation (1) misjudging it favorably ,2) misjudging it disfavorably, 3) fair assessment of the task at hand). What would be more interesting is to discuss how you get from one phase to the other (especially from 2 to 3).

    >If you're staying abroad from your own country, what phase would you consider yourself to be?
    definitely 3. As a second generation immigrant in a country that isn't the USA, I always was a forever foreigner. There always will be bigots, there always will be people telling me to go back, or to tell me to stop "fucking their women", people telling me "i do not understand the culture enough", et cetera. I've also noticed that the westerners that were so keen on telling minorities to shut up and stop whining back home start yapping like fucking dogs when the exact same things happen to them.

    At some point, if you see yourself staying for a while, learn the language, start befriending a few locals, even if it's your fucking 7/11 mart cashier or your local street food vendor. Make people warm up to you and you'll warm up to the country as well. Don't live in a fucking depressing bubble of hatred and condescendence, especially if you're there for a long while, because you'll end up even pushing your wife and kids from it as your kids will integrate better and your wife just matures and accepts her roots more than when she met you.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >As a second generation immigrant in a country that isn't the USA, I always was a forever foreigner. There always will be bigots, there always will be people telling me to go back, or to tell me to stop "fucking their women", people telling me "i do not understand the culture enough", et cetera.
      i suppose i'm a "second generation immigrant" in the uk, and i have never felt anything other than british.
      maybe because my parents didn't lock themselves away, didn't stay in a tiny enclave, actually bothered to learn the language and became citizens. they dropped themselves in proverbial the deep end. i should point out that this was some time ago and things were much more difficult for immigrants at that time- people didn't pander to them like they do now and there was no "multiculturalism", they didn't get treated any differently from normal british people, which is what they became
      >the westerners
      you sound like quite a bigot yourself. no wonder the locals hate you if you carry that fucking chip on your shoulder the whole time

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    yes but with phase 3 being the realization that sweden is just a shithole and thanking god I wasnt born there

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    No because I didn't move out of some quirky obsession for the country but strictly for financial and business reasons since my home country was(still is) going to shit

    So I just started from stress/anxiety basically

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Expat
    You mean immigrant.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Immigrant means you are a criminal welfare recipient

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've met a shit ton of expats in Korea. China and Thailand who just stay at the anxiety stage. 99% of them are old white European boomers who refuse to learn anything about the language or culture. So I will have to disagree with the theory. Ironically the best expats I meet who try to adopt (go local) to the home country are....blacks. Arabs and Indians are also fucking terrible which is ironic considering their countries are some of the biggest shitholes on the planet.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That's good that blacks are thriving in Korea since Koreans don't breed and the WEF plan is to ship 55 million Africans in by 2030 to give Korea its needed diversity

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Incredibly few blacks in Korea. The biggest immigrant group that is causing problems and not assimilating are the Uzbekistanis. Pakistanis are also bad but theres nowhere near as many of them.
        >Diversity
        Unfortunately Koreans have gotten fucked HARD by christcucks and mutt culture. The Korean elite send their children to American universities where they come back as retarded liberals and then try to put their american-centrix opinions down Korean's throats. Unfortunately it is kinda working.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Tons of blacks in Itaewon. Not US military either, but like straight up African. They even have a mosque there.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >"Tons"
            We have different definitions on this. Regardless I much prefer friendly Africans over uncivilized overly sensitive American morons.

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