Travel Consoooomerism

What's are some uncommon items you like to bring with you when traveling?

I only travel with a 25L backpack so I bring one of those Heroclip Carabineers. You can get knockoffs on AliExpress for about $5. They let you hang your backpack anywhere, on a bathroom stall door, on a table, on a chair, etc.

I also like to bring a spork, a pair of chopsticks, a silk pillowcase (comfy) which doubles as a laundry bag, a travel belt with a plastic buckle for going through metal detectors and to hide money if you have to bribe a cop or get robbed (an actual
belt, bit one of those gay slings/fannypacks), a USB flash drive (dual type A and type C to transfer files from my phone) with important documents so you can easily get things printed, a stain remover pen, and I keep a laundry dryer sheet in my bag to keep things fresh (last a few weeks).

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

Yakub: World's Greatest Dad Shirt $21.68

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

  1. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Nothing really uncommon. Notepad, pen, flashdriver, shoe bags, laundry bag, power socket adaptor, portable cigarette ashtray, fligts and hotel reservation printed, money in me, in my personal item and my cabin bag...

  2. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    packing cubes
    long USB cable (makes charging stuff so much easier)
    small messenger bag/bum bag to use in cities instead of a rucksack

  3. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    That's a THC vape cartridge

  4. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I pack a lot into compartments so things are separated and compact. I have everything written down and a pen which often proves useful. I pack three pairs of underwear per day, better to have extra. I pack any shoes into separate bags to keep clean inside and a bag for laundry in case I can't wash items. I always have an address and photo of where I am going. I always have wet and dry tissues. I always have mint gum and some ibuprofen. Often pack vitamins but usually can but them anywhere.

    Idk that anything is unusual

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I pack three pairs of underwear per day, better to have extra.
      How often do you shit yourself to justify this?

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's because I change them every 12 hours, and if I sweat I will change them again midday. I also try not to do laundry more than once so having more means less times I need to do that. I learned this because fewer pairs means washing them in the hotel sink and drying them out instead of trying finding a laundromat for a few items or handing over my panties to random hotel staff. Maybe you are careless about the clothing that touches your genitals but I am careful.

  5. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Binoculars and spotting scopes.
    Scopes (with tripod) are a b***h to travel with, they take up a lot of space inside the luggage.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Binoculars
      same, especially for deserts. But even those take up so much of my small bag. I only have these 70s japanese ones I got for $30.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        nice to meet a fellow based 70s japanese wide field of view binocular enjoyer

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Binoculars
      same, especially for deserts. But even those take up so much of my small bag. I only have these 70s japanese ones I got for $30.

      That's what monoculars are for.

      • 8 months ago
        Anonymous

        Cringe monocular user vs based depth perception enjoyer.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      >binoculars
      the only good answer in this thread. binos rock.

  6. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    A power strip/surge protector if you're bringing a laptop or phone and other things that require charging. Doesn't take up that much room and solves the problem of there only being one available plug in the hotel/hostel room.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      I used to do this, but if you have a modern laptop that supports USB-C charging it's irrelevant. I'd still recommended a surge protector in turd world countries with shitty grids.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      their outlets probably aren't grounded so surge protectors are useless

  7. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    Earplugs. Quality earplugs can be amazingly difficult to find.
    Spork or spoon is a great idea. You never know when you will want to eat something in a room without a kitchen.
    Money belts are unnecessary unless you wear women's pants with useless pockets. Instead, bring some rubber bands to wad up your extra cash.

    • 8 months ago
      Anonymous

      You are not going to leave us hanging, are you? What earplugs?

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      You are not going to leave us hanging, are you? What earplugs?

      I have Pinlock brand earplugs that I use for my motorbike, they are silicon with a special meme filter that blocks damaging/annoying frequencies whilst still being able to hear voices fairly well.

      They're amazing at blocking out droning or humming noises such as on a plane, noisy AC units and snoring (designed for wind noise on a helmet). Significantly more comfy than those disposable foam plugs too.

  8. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't normally wear wristwatches in my everyday life, but sometimes I do when I'm traveling.

    >people can get the time from their phone
    That's how I usually do it, but if I'm in a gypsy-ridden area, having my phone out may not be the greatest idea.

    >those damn dirty gypsies could just steal your watch
    That's why I wear a watch that's a reasonable balance between cheap and accurate. I would be far less upset about losing a $20 Casio digital watch than a phone or a more expensive watch.

  9. 8 months ago
    Anonymous

    I am a very compact traveler, so all my items are catered around being compact and lightweight, with disregard for cost. I typically travel with only a personal item on airplanes, and I've done multi-week trips like that. I'm not going to share basic items like others are (earplugs, sleep mask, packing cubes), I'll share what I actually find useful.

    >Peak design packing cubes
    They compress nicely. They look nice too. Con is that they're expensive.
    >Eagle Creek Compression Bag Pack-It Compression Bag M
    It's a compressible vacuum sealed bag that to compresses your clothes. You put your clothes inside, then push out all the air. I use this to store my dirty clothes. It's also airtight so the stinky clothing smell doesn't affect the rest of my bag.
    >Xero Genesis sandals
    These are the thinnest and lightest sandals I have seen. I use them as flip-flops. I wear them to the shower in hostels, or on a short walk across dirty floors.
    >Patagonia Nano Puff
    It's an extremely lightweight compressible jacket that stuffs into itself. Made of excellent materials. It only weighs 350g. Con is it's not very waterproof. So I also bring a:
    >plastic poncho
    In case it rains
    >Montbell travel umbrella
    This is by far, the lightest and most compact umbrella I have ever seen. Japanese product and it's extremely durable. Con is it's a little small, and expensive at €69.00. It's saved my life dozens of times. I love this product.
    >Vapur Collapsible Water Bottle
    It's a plastic sack that holds water. It rolls up inside itself when you don't use it. It takes up exactly as much space as you fill it with water. It's tiny when empty. It's not amazing, but I don't have space to carry a real water bottle with me.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      As a veteran I don't really recommend anything in the way of tourist junk. It's heavy, you can't replace it easily, it makes you look new.

      Poly undershirts are worth it, microfiber towels are worth it, flip flops or light sandals are worth it (not those 200 euro cork sandals). Adapters, yea you'll need one. a power bank is good but you'll really use it for emergencies so you don't need a huge one.

      Peak cringe.
      Packing cubes just take up more space, you're better off bundling things inside a shirt. A regular ass plastic water bottle compresses if you scrunch it, it's a zero value item. A water bladder is way more sensible.
      >travel umbrella
      Bruh.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        Peak moron.
        >doesn't understand how packing cubes work
        Packing cubes compress your clothes so they take up LESS space. I can fit 20-30% more clothes in the same volume.
        >claiming a water bladder is way more sensible.
        You're fricking braindead. This product IS a water bladder. Except better, because it rolls up and there's no straw.
        >doesn't comprehend carrying an umbrella
        If you don't carry an umbrella, you don't travel enough. You've never been to a tropical country in your life.
        When it starts raining, you either:
        * Get wet like your pussy (this is you)
        * Buy a new shitty umbrella in every place you visit. Then throw it away. I've done this at least 5 times. And realized this is dumb as frick.
        * Or buy a fricking nice compact umbrella, and take that with you.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Different anon. Do you have any recommendations for a high quality light weight umbrella?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            the only one I know is montbell. Japan makes loads of great ones, everyone commutes and needs an umbrella during rainy season.

            >not bringing a lightweight raincoat
            I don't buy nice umbrellas because I tend to forget them once the weather clears up, something that especially applies to tropical countries.

            anon, lightweight raincoats are unusable in the tropics countries.
            * The lightweight ones are worthless, because they are only water-resistant, not waterproof. They soak through after 20 mins of tropical downpour, and remain soaked for hours afterwards, making them unusable.
            * The ones that actually work (waterproof ones) are too large, thick, and bulky for traveling. That leads to the second problem which is:
            * It's so fricking hot and humid (30C with 90%+ humidity) that you literally can't wear anything more than a t-shirt. A jacket designed to keep water out will also keep water IN. Wear a lightweight raincoat in singapore for more than 10 minutes, and you'll be drenched in your own sweat.

            As proof: Go to thailand or singapore and look at what the locals wear. Nobody wears raincoats. It's umbrellas everywhere. And maybe a plastic poncho on a motorcycle delivery driver. Raincoats are useful when it's rainy AND cold, like <20C. Otherwise, they're walking sweat chambers.

            how do they work to take up less space? Might try some. I dont really understand the point of the vacuum pack. Do you get vacuums in the hotels?

            https://www.peakdesign.com/products/packing-cube?variant=11531140038700
            for packing cubes, you put your clothes in, then use the zipper to compress your clothes.
            For the vacuum bag, it's a plastic ziplock bag with some one-way valves. You put your clothes in, zip it up, then push out the air yourself by sitting on the bag. There's no machine to do it for you.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          >not bringing a lightweight raincoat
          I don't buy nice umbrellas because I tend to forget them once the weather clears up, something that especially applies to tropical countries.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          how do they work to take up less space? Might try some. I dont really understand the point of the vacuum pack. Do you get vacuums in the hotels?

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >how do they work to take up less space?
            They keep your textiles compact by preventing them from expanding.
            >Do you get vacuums in the hotels?
            They have a one-way valve that allows you to push out most of the air by applying some force to the pack.
            They're not exactly a vacuum but rather bags with minimal space for air.

  10. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Condoms and dick pills. Finding condoms that fit you can be an issue in some countries.

  11. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Always bring a flashlight.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      I see the purpose, but really, why? Unless you travel to literal shitholes it's safe to expect that the power grid is reliable, the lights will work, you'll be able to charge your phone, and that your phone's flashlight will be sufficient. It's different if you need a bike light or a headlamp got hiking. If you're on foot a flashlight is just one of those unnecessary "what if" items.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        I usually have a random plastic card (not a credit card) in my luggage for pic related.

        It's getting better now, but for a long time you didn't know if you could charge your phone on your nightstand, so a small flashlight saved a lot of trouble, especially when you weren't the only one in your room.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          >I usually have a random plastic card (not a credit card) in my luggage for pic related.
          I've heard that even non-plastic cards, such as paper business cards, work with those things. Not that I ever had any real issue with them; about 70% of the time, they give me two keys anyway.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      *fleshlight

  12. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Digital, open source consoomer here.
    I have
    >2 home servers
    >2 VPSs
    >2 wireguard VPNs
    >1 travel router
    >1 zoneminder instance for home webcam motion detection
    >2 ssh instances
    >1 UPS
    >2 live USBs with Ubuntu (1 persistent)
    feels good to know any country with limited internet content can be BTFOd by some simple asymmetric encryption.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      you sound like an insufferable reddit gay

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        speak for yourself

        Sounds interesting, do you take this everywhere or is there a minimum number of days you spend somewhere to justify taking everything with you?

        just when I am going somewhere I shouldn't be, or when I know networks will be sketchy (certain commercial cafes, and countries)

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds interesting, do you take this everywhere or is there a minimum number of days you spend somewhere to justify taking everything with you?

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Or you can avoid all that nonsense and just carry a flash drive with enough content to keep you entertained for a year. A 512 GB flash drive is $30-35.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        How can I do banking on my 512 GB flash drive?

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          bootable Tails

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            >banking on a public computer

            Does paying for first class/business class on flights count as consoomerism? I have a roundtrip flight coming up, 5 hours each way. Back of the bus ticket price is $399 total, or First Class is $980 total. It's more than twice the price so it's not just a "little more" but I'm wondering if it's worth it. I fricking hate coach every year they spend billions to make those seats scientifically more uncomfortable.

            >domestic "first class"

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          Your laptop can already run a VPN or virtual machines of you want to go that route.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Why two home servers / vps?

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        NTA but redundancy will keep you from getting screwed if one of them goes down for whatever reason.

  13. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Does paying for first class/business class on flights count as consoomerism? I have a roundtrip flight coming up, 5 hours each way. Back of the bus ticket price is $399 total, or First Class is $980 total. It's more than twice the price so it's not just a "little more" but I'm wondering if it's worth it. I fricking hate coach every year they spend billions to make those seats scientifically more uncomfortable.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      5 hours is nothing. I'd consider it for 10 hours+

  14. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    I might fall into consoom, but I think it's time I put in 8 or 10 bucks in packing organizers/cubes, either for my backpack or my suitcase. I'm sick of using plastic bags like a hobo. I'm not in my 20's anymore.

  15. 7 months ago
    Anonymous

    Holy shot why are there so many packing cube gays in this thread? You are a massive downie if you need, or are stupid enough to use, packing cubes.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      Fight me then motherfricker. Meet me somewhere. My cube army will NOT be silenced.

    • 7 months ago
      Anonymous

      What's not to like? They keep all of your clothes compact and in one place. I understand if you're using a suitcase like a moron, but for us backpack chads they're quite handy.

      • 7 months ago
        Anonymous

        I have a different invention that keeps things together in one place, it's called a BACKPACK. It's like a 'packing cube', only it has staps on it and I can wear it on my instead of carrying a load of 'cubes' in my hands in front of me like an utter pudding.

        • 7 months ago
          Anonymous

          >... instead of carrying a load of 'cubes' in my hands in front of me like an utter pudding.
          I didn't think I was talking to this big of a moron. Like I said before, you put the cube in your backpack.

          • 7 months ago
            Anonymous

            No. I don't put the cube in my backpack. I put the stuff I would have put in the 'cube' straight into my backpack, because the inside of my backpack is not made of some corrosive material. This saves me carrying the extra weight of extra layers of bags around.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *