Travel Tips

Post your travel tips.

1. Use a binder clip to attach your passport to one of the natural creases at the top of the curtains in your hotel room to hide if from opportunistic hotel maids.
2. Have some app that can translate images.
3. Download maps offline whether you're using Google Maps or OpenStreetMaps.
4. Bring some Viagra or Cialis even if you don't plan on cooming just in case and make sure to try it out at home with a low dose first, lol.
5. If you have a big dick then bring condoms too. You can find big boy condoms in Asia, but it's not easy.
6. If you have multiple bank accounts then keep what you think you'll need + emergency in one and leave the other debit cards at home that way if your card is lost or stolen you limit the damage. Remember if someone has your debit card they can access both checking and savings.
7. If your bank supports daily or monthly limits set those. I set mine to $200 a day.
8. Bring one of those little travel packs of tissues with you in case there's no toilet paper. Even in Japan where they (mostly) use bidets.
9. If you're at a hotel and they have those little packets of shaving cream take some. Much better than lugging around a can of shaving cream.
10. Don't overpack. Everything you bring (including a day backpack, purse, or fanny pack) should comfortably fit in a carry-on sized suitcase at the most. I use a 30L backpack and still have room left for souvenirs.

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  1. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Wise card and wet wipes.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Use a binder clip to attach your passport to one of the natural creases at the top of the curtains
      wtf
      >Download maps offline whether you're using Google Maps or OpenStreetMaps
      good advice, same for music on your phone so you don't have to worry about wifi during flights or transit
      >leave the other debit cards at home
      also worth calling your bank and letting them know you'll be traveling to that country so they don't lock your account
      >little travel packs of tissues
      good tip, some places with the squirt gun give you nothing to dry yourself off with, worth carrying around so you don't have to airdry

      >Wise card
      Is this good? I was thinking about getting a card just for travel with better currency conversions or that gives airmiles but I haven't done research yet

      I have a couple.
      1. Since clothes will take up the most bulk and weight in your pack, learn how to sink/shower wash your dirty articles every night. All you need to put in is laundry detergent and elbow grease.
      2. Reversible clothing will extend time between washes even further (though it won't double it, it'll safely add one extra day).
      3. A belt can be used as a compression strap or a makeshift sling. You can thread it between the sleeves of a jacket to carry the jacket with you as a "shoulder bag", and if you have a travel belt (one with an inner pocket) you can even stuff it with socks for makeshift padding.
      4. Most thefts are ones of opportunity or being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Keeping your bag with you, and keeping out of dark alleyways, will do more for your valuables than a Pacsafe or luggage lock.
      5. Carry a reusable valveless face mask with you if you're traveling to any Asian city. You can deny vaccines, but not air pollution.
      6. Good shoes are more valuable than a good pack. If you think about how often you'll be walking around and standing, you'll understand why seasoned travelers wear comfy, lightweight (sometimes barefoot) shoes.
      7. If you camel up at water sources, you won't have to lug around a water bottle. Even if you choose to do so, you can buy a drink the locals like and reuse the bottle instead of bringing a collapsible bottle. Toss when dirty and repeat. Drinks are cheap and a good way to sample the taste of a foreign country.
      8. I'll one-up OP and say that even if you don't have tissues, you can always just steal toilet paper and keep some folded up in your pocket, to be prepared.
      9. A (frameless) 20L bag is the standard for RyanAir and other budget airlines, so if you can reduce your belongings to that amount you're free to take advantage of their super cheap flights. A fillable neck pillow, travel belt, jacket, and etc. can give you a little extra stuff space, they won't count as your personal item.

      >Since clothes will take up the most bulk and weight in your pack, learn how to sink/shower wash your dirty articles every night. All you need to put in is laundry detergent and elbow grease.
      Every night? You can easily fit a week's worth of clothes in a bag and still have plenty of room and just do laundry once a week
      >valveless face mask for air pollution
      get one with an exhaust valve, it's cooler, lets you breathe easier and it's just as effective because it's a one-way valve

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        An empty plastic bag or two in your luggage can come in very handy, e.g. to separate wet laundry, going food shopping, wrapping delicate items or to prevent liquids from spilling.
        Refill your travel-sized items like shampoo, shower and shaving gel.
        Toilet paper is very versatile, bring it from home or swipe it from your hotel room.
        An empty bottle that you can fill after security checks prevents you from being ripped off by airport shops.
        A couple of paper clips can be handy to keep documents and tickets together plus they work well to open the SIM trays of phones.
        Have a second wallet with some cash, another debit/credit card and some form of ID, can be very useful in case your primary wallet goes missing.

        >If your bank supports daily or monthly limits set those. I set mine to $200 a day.
        That will majorly frick you up in case things go wrong and you need to book alternative transportation or lodging, even if you might get compensated for it later on.

        >>Wise card
        >Is this good? I was thinking about getting a card just for travel with better currency conversions or that gives airmiles but I haven't done research yet
        Really depends on your country and bank.
        In any case, the card itself is a one-time fee and therefore worth trying even just as a backup for a primary card.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Really depends on your country and bank.
          I'm a leaf and my bank would certainly screw me any chance they get

          >Every night? You can easily fit a week's worth of clothes in a bag and still have plenty of room and just do laundry once a week
          Depends on the person. I tend to travel very light so I only need a few outfits, and even with a 20L I like leaving a lot of empty space so I can bring food and other souvenirs back. Another benefit is that you don't need to bring a clothesline. Since you're washing and drying an article or two every night you can get away with an inflatable hanger (or the hangers the hotel provides). Someone could definitely do what you suggest though.
          >get one with an exhaust valve, it's cooler, lets you breathe easier and it's just as effective because it's a one-way valve
          Agreed, but sometimes airlines and cities will still have COVID-era bans in place on masks with valves. I don't like hassle and I don't like strangers approaching me to notify me about some rule I couldn't be bothered to look up, so I just go with what's universally accepted.

          >I tend to travel very light so I only need a few outfits, and even with a 20L I like leaving a lot of empty space so I can bring food and other souvenirs back
          Guess that makes sense, seems more inconvenient to me but it does make traveling light
          >Another benefit is that you don't need to bring a clothesline
          I've never head of anyone bringing a clothesline traveling. Maybe I could see it if you're traveling somewhere really rural/poor or living out of a car.
          >airlines and cities will still have COVID-era bans in place on masks with valves
          Damn, what a moronic rule, anyone know which airlines or cities still have this?

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Then apply for a TransferWise and a Revolut card, they each have a free tier where you can withdraw a certain amount of money at ATMs for free, afterwards they'll charge you a small percentage. Spending at payment terminals is free AFAIK.
            Getting both cards gives you more free withdrawals and you'll have a free backup card.
            Make sure to top up the cards via bank transfer and not via credit card.
            If you have Apple or Google pay, you can put your cards there as well for an additional set of payment methods.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Every night? You can easily fit a week's worth of clothes in a bag and still have plenty of room and just do laundry once a week
        Depends on the person. I tend to travel very light so I only need a few outfits, and even with a 20L I like leaving a lot of empty space so I can bring food and other souvenirs back. Another benefit is that you don't need to bring a clothesline. Since you're washing and drying an article or two every night you can get away with an inflatable hanger (or the hangers the hotel provides). Someone could definitely do what you suggest though.
        >get one with an exhaust valve, it's cooler, lets you breathe easier and it's just as effective because it's a one-way valve
        Agreed, but sometimes airlines and cities will still have COVID-era bans in place on masks with valves. I don't like hassle and I don't like strangers approaching me to notify me about some rule I couldn't be bothered to look up, so I just go with what's universally accepted.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >also worth calling your bank and letting them know you'll be traveling to that country so they don't lock your account

        To stay on a the safer side you should consider getting Virtual visa cards like Wirex, Miles or Binance card.

  2. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Use a binder clip to attach your passport to one of the natural creases at the top of the curtains in your hotel room to hide if from opportunistic hotel maids.
    I bring my passport with me everywhere I go if I am overseas. Do people usually leave theirs at the hotel? It seems like such a vital thing that I can't imagine leaving it off my person.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >1. Use a binder clip to attach your passport to one of the natural creases at the top of the curtains in your hotel room to hide if from opportunistic hotel maids.
      Why not just get a normal passport holder for 10 dollars. Also what fricking shit hotels do you stay in where maids are likely to snag a passport from? That's like the dumbest place to swipe something like that.
      >8. Bring one of those little travel packs of tissues with you in case there's no toilet paper. Even in Japan where they (mostly) use bidets.
      Virtually every toliet in Japan has toliet paper or some tissue there for you to use for various reasons. Unless you're in some public park that's the only time some might be out.
      Most your points are pretty fricking bad.

      Most the time outside COVID, I have always left my passport in my bag maybe wrapped in a sock or somewhere not worth people to look for over finding maybe some quick cash.
      Generally though any modern hotel you book at will have basic security, with hostels maybe being iffy but avoidable with a lock most the time.
      People in most hotels aren't going to go for a passport since that's often something that you know instantly is gone and can be canned. This goes without saying it can often be tracked with how covid modernized a lot of things and bringing larger police attention to the area.

      Most crooks will go for your laptop, spare cash, CC, and run. Alternatively most will just look to scam you in a way you don't know you're losing cash to. Passport snatchers are going to be in the bottom of the barrel places that you should know keep this on you. Also replacing a lost passport abroad sucks but anyone typing on SighSee is probably from a country with an embassy office abroad and can get you back home at the very least.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >what fricking shit hotels do you stay in where maids are likely to snag a passport from? That's like the dumbest place to swipe something like that.
        The most common thing isn't physical theft, but taking a picture of it and selling it off to criminals who's specialty is identity theft. Dealing with the fallout from that shit can be a real pain in the ass and can take you years to fully resolve because a lot of businesses will be after you thinking you owe them money

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          Does that really happen to non-Americans?

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Happens to everyone but identities from Europe, North America and Australia are worth the most so we need to be extra careful

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              I only hear of Americans seriously suffering from identity theft, for Europeans it seems to be at the same level as an unauthorised charge to your credit card, i.e. dispute and they have to prove that it has been really you.
              Besides, why would they bother stealing your passport when they can just copy the copy stored at the front desk?

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                I've read plenty of stories from European countries of people having had their lives turned upside-down after someone stole their identity and took out credit cards in their names, maxed out personal loans and even leased expensive cars which then disappeared into eastern europe forever. It's not an American phenomena although some Euro countries might have better checks and balances in place to avoid it.

                >Besides, why would they bother stealing your passport when they can just copy the copy stored at the front desk?
                Because the maids don't have access to the computer system or every locked cabinet at the front desk. Most maids are honest but there are still many who will opportunistically take pictures of passports if they see them in the rooms, because they know that they can make a little extra money with zero risk

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >took out credit cards in their names
                Not happening without a credit check, for which my home address is needed. The address is not found in the passport. The newly issued cards would be sent to that address, so they would need to be physically intercept them at the home address.
                >maxed out personal loans
                If done at a bank which I'm already a customer at, they'd need access to my online banking account secured by 3 factors. Resetting this access requires my physical presence or at least some inside knowledge about my bank accounts and the ability to intercept registered mail addressed to my home address.
                If they want to open a line of credit at a new bank, they'd trigger a credit check (see above), plus they'd need the equivalent of my social security number, which isn't found in the passport nor on any other photo ID. They would also need the original passport plus either my physical presence or a live video feed of me following the identification process of whatever bank or lender they apply to.
                >leased expensive cars
                Again, credit check and the requirement of original documents plus a valid driver's license of mine. Getting the car off the lot will be challenging without a license plate in the name of the leasing company and yours truly, which needs more stuff from the DMV.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                >I've read plenty of stories from European countries of people having had their lives turned upside-down
                These stories usually leave out some important details such as falling for a romance or business scam and the victim providing much more than just a passport scan.

                The biggest danger of passport scans getting into the wrong hands is that they could be used in the above-mentioned romance or business scams, but usually these won't affect you directly unless the police gets involved and even then it's a ma
                Again, identity theft isn't that much of a deal in continental Europe as it is in the US.

                What you need to worry about in your room is cash, NFC cards and things that can be easily fenced such as israeliteellery and designer goods.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                it's possible they could weasel with a passport some loopholes and fakes to get by, but unlikely. In the event you notice your passport is missing and alert in a reasonable time-frame, 24-72 hours it's highly unlikely that anything will happen.

                Passports are generally meaningless to steal an identity unless traveling via subhuman level countries or border checks that are just some dude stopping your car and waving you through like in europe.

                >I've read plenty of stories from European countries of people having had their lives turned upside-down
                These stories usually leave out some important details such as falling for a romance or business scam and the victim providing much more than just a passport scan.

                The biggest danger of passport scans getting into the wrong hands is that they could be used in the above-mentioned romance or business scams, but usually these won't affect you directly unless the police gets involved and even then it's a ma
                Again, identity theft isn't that much of a deal in continental Europe as it is in the US.

                What you need to worry about in your room is cash, NFC cards and things that can be easily fenced such as israeliteellery and designer goods.

                There are so many free credit monitoring tools that anyone should sign up for it's insane. I have creditkarma just to monitor accounts, don't pay a dime but has helped me with old outstanding shit.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                It has to do with the US use of social security identification numbers for business purposes which was never the intention of them when they were created as they weren't designed to be a secure identifier.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                what the FRICK is with that?

                >yooooo give jobs your number, give schools and applications aplenty your number. but don't let anyone else get it, or you're completely fricked. keep it super secret!

                wtf

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Virtually every toliet in Japan has toliet paper or some tissue there for you to use for various reasons. Unless you're in some public park that's the only time some might be out.
        You have completely missed the point of his point, They used it as a point to say you should bring it everywhere you go even if you know a country should have it available.

  3. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    keep atleast 50$ in a tube up your ass when traveling around, in case of emergencies

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      i have a hidden compartment inside of a hat to keep money in, lets me keep my ass spare to put other things in

  4. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have a couple.
    1. Since clothes will take up the most bulk and weight in your pack, learn how to sink/shower wash your dirty articles every night. All you need to put in is laundry detergent and elbow grease.
    2. Reversible clothing will extend time between washes even further (though it won't double it, it'll safely add one extra day).
    3. A belt can be used as a compression strap or a makeshift sling. You can thread it between the sleeves of a jacket to carry the jacket with you as a "shoulder bag", and if you have a travel belt (one with an inner pocket) you can even stuff it with socks for makeshift padding.
    4. Most thefts are ones of opportunity or being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Keeping your bag with you, and keeping out of dark alleyways, will do more for your valuables than a Pacsafe or luggage lock.
    5. Carry a reusable valveless face mask with you if you're traveling to any Asian city. You can deny vaccines, but not air pollution.
    6. Good shoes are more valuable than a good pack. If you think about how often you'll be walking around and standing, you'll understand why seasoned travelers wear comfy, lightweight (sometimes barefoot) shoes.
    7. If you camel up at water sources, you won't have to lug around a water bottle. Even if you choose to do so, you can buy a drink the locals like and reuse the bottle instead of bringing a collapsible bottle. Toss when dirty and repeat. Drinks are cheap and a good way to sample the taste of a foreign country.
    8. I'll one-up OP and say that even if you don't have tissues, you can always just steal toilet paper and keep some folded up in your pocket, to be prepared.
    9. A (frameless) 20L bag is the standard for RyanAir and other budget airlines, so if you can reduce your belongings to that amount you're free to take advantage of their super cheap flights. A fillable neck pillow, travel belt, jacket, and etc. can give you a little extra stuff space, they won't count as your personal item.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Most thefts are ones of opportunity or being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Keeping your bag with you, and keeping out of dark alleyways, will do more for your valuables than a Pacsafe or luggage lock.

      if you're going somewhere known for pickpocketing and muggings then it will eventually happen to you if you're there for long enough or just get unlucky. I did erasmus in Barcelona and almost everyone got robbed at some point. you let your guard down for a few seconds while wearing a backpack on the metro and someone will rifle through it and steal any electronics you have in there before you know it. foreigners not paying attention attract interest like shite attracts flies

      people eventually took to only using crap feature phones and having a fake wallet with only a little cash and expired cards they could just hand over. eventually you learn who the thieves are and monkey style eye contact dominance is usually enough to deter them

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >eventually you learn who the thieves are
        You're talking about Black folk, correct?

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Black folk and sandBlack folk

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            Don't forget gypsies.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        1. >Carry cigarettes and a lighter everywhere.

        Excellent way to get annoying beggars, weirdos and other desirables away from you and on their good side. Also an excellent way to socialise with strangers, not to mention if you ever end up stranded in a fricked up location at a fricked up time with nothing to do, smoking is a great pastime.

        2. >Credit card with high credit limit as well as spare card in sock that you walk around with.

        Best kind of emergency object there is. Will save your ass no matter where you are in the world, really. I have a close friend that got beaten by a bunch of Turkroaches who took everything he had, wallet, phone, money etc. He was basically stranded. If he followed that one simple trick he wouldn’t be in that position.

        I live in Barcelona and it really is a city of hyper vigilance. If you come from somewhere that doesn’t have them kind of issues, it can be incredibly hard to adapt and be aware of your possessions at all times. The theft is less “opportunistic” than some people think. The guys on the metro for example will sit on it all day, looking for the right person to strike on.

        Even then, it’s a city where theft and robbery is extremely, extremely prevalent BUT (apart from the metro) it’s entirely localised to a handful of select areas. Stay away from them, you stay away from the crime. The only sad part then is that the areas with the most prevalence are usually the ones most worth visiting.

        >monkey style eye contact dominance is usually enough to deter them

        100%. Thieves are doing this to make money. They’re somewhat professional and organised. It’s in their best interest to avoid confrontation where possible.

        Most of the time, even in upfront robbery situations, they don’t have a knife or a weapon. They rob people through sheer intimidation. The simple solution is don’t be intimated, if you can’t fight a 120lb malnourished Moroccan you deserve to be robbed.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          >The theft is less “opportunistic” than some people think. The guys on the metro for example will sit on it all day, looking for the right person to strike on.
          This. Also people don't realize they work in teams so there will be multiple of them surrounding you for misdirection (touching some part of your body with their body so you're focused on that touch rather than your wallet being slipped out of your pocket) and block you off from view from other passengers.
          What's funny too is they usually have like a "pick pocket uniform" of sorts. Ie, sun glasses and hats etc to make them less identifiable, so you can usually spot them quite easily because there's like three or four guys conspicuously wearing sunglasses and hats surrounding and scanning the bus, train or whatever.

          >Most of the time, even in upfront robbery situations, they don’t have a knife or a weapon. They rob people through sheer intimidation.
          Also this. There's usually two ways you get robbed.
          1) Snatch theft/rob-and-run.
          - You're drunk at the ATM handling some money. Some dude snatches it from your hand and runs and jumps on a motorcycle with his friend waiting.
          - You're casually carrying your bag and a motorcycle crew snatches it off your shoulder.
          2) Offering services and intimidating.
          - You walk off the plane with your charter group and there's a bunch of people waiting and offering to carry your bag to the bus. Surprise, they want $10+ for carrying your bag 50 meters and they'll get aggressive if you don't pay up.
          - You're buying drugs and the seller asks you to follow him around the corner or whatever. Suddenly surrounded by a group of aggressive people who'll sell you the drugs, but at a ridiculous price.
          - Some girl takes you to a bar and the drinks are a super expensive.
          - You take a cab and have to pay a fortune.
          The intimidation stuff tries to skirt a legal grey area, so if you argue they'll likely just back off. Don't pay until they get physical or show you a weapon.

  5. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    If going somewhere with shitty water, or hiking remote trails, bring a lifestraw or sawyer water filter.

    The sawyer tap filter means you can drink water from your hotel room sink or pretty much any tap.

  6. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I want to try and book a hotel room at a particular hotel around the time of an upcoming event. Are there any reputable sites that'll give you alerts when a hotel becomes available to book?

  7. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    - Bring a 2-in-1 convertible Chromebook instead of a Mac/Windows laptop or a Android tablet. It does all the things you expect from a computer on the web but doesn't weigh a ton, has great battery life and can be held like a tablet. I have the Lenovo Duet 5 and it has a 13 inch widescreen AMOLED screen with detachable keyboard and an a real 15 hours of battery life and only weighs a kilo. Writing on it now in bed after I feel asleep watching a movie and after 8+ hours it's still at 35%.
    - Take an extra passport with you if it's available in your country.
    - Get a cheap, flimsy (the flimsier the better) neck wallet and swap the string for some paracord and tie it around your waist. Keep your passport and some cash in a zip bag and tuck the wallet inside your pants. It's by far the most comfortable hidden wallet.
    - Keep a wallet with a bundle of cash and an expired bank card in your pocket, just in case you have to trade something for your life.
    - A backpack with tuckable shoulder straps is good. A backpack with a duffel sling even better. Makes life so much easier in public transportation.
    - Grab a couple of sets of clothes, merino wool if possible because they don't smell. Buy some new clothes locally, matching them with what the locals are wearing. Differences in fashion can make you stick out like a sore thumb.
    - If you're white in an asian or black country, you're not gonna blend in. Don't try to tress like a "rugged" backpacker because they're usually on monthly trips and carry thousands of dollars in cash and expensive tech etc in their backpack. Dress like a weekender tourist instead. A weekender tourist only has money for a short term stay and keeps his valuables safely locked away in his all-inclusive resort. Plus, cops actually care if the former get robbed because it's terrible for business. Obviously, one of these two is a bigger target than the other.
    - Bring a clothesline and something to keep your dirty clothes in.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >cops actually care if the former
      *latter

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      - If you carry a lot of stuff it's more likely that cab drivers will try to take advantage of you.
      - Cabs at tourist resorts are usually fullblown scams and the cops don't care, so make sure you get a quote before you step into the cab or on the motorbike or whatever. And if possible, take public transportation instead.
      - Always ask to check the room when you check in. If it smells like mold - skip. If you lift up the bed sheets and there's specks of blood - skip (bed bugs).
      - Don't eat street food in asian countries. Just don't. If you want something quick and cheap then go to a store and buy something instead.
      - Don't go to the ATM or the exchange to take out money when you're drunk at night. This is how most people get robbed.
      - Don't escalate arguments, just cut your losses and walk away. You could be a 100% in the right but will still be the one ending up in jail, or worse.
      - Don't underestimate the racism of 3rd world countries in general. They're savages and white people morals and laws don't apply.
      - Don't coom in prostitutes. There's diseases you can catch that are chronic and that virtually every prostitute carries. Get on a dating app and pay for some frickable uni student's or single mom's rent for a couple of months instead.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Cabs at are usually fullblown scams
        FTFY
        >make sure you get a quote before you step into the cab or on the motorbike or whatever.
        Taxi apps work wonder for that, ask around if there is a local version that has more driver or is cheaper.
        >- Don't eat street food in asian countries if your stomach didn't get used to the local circumstances.
        Usual precautions about hygiene still apply but if you've stayed at a place for a month you will likely be able to handle street food.
        >- Don't go to the ATM or the exchange to take out money when at night.
        True, handle larger amounts of cash only inside lively places e.g. banks or shopping malls or in your own room.
        Using badly lit outdoor ATMs with no witnesses is asking for trouble.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Taxi apps work wonder for that
          No, they don't. Taxi apps are mostly limited to big cities.
          >Usual precautions about hygiene still apply but if you've stayed at a place for a month you will likely be able to handle street food.
          That's a myth. Your stomach wont automatically adjust to harmful pathogens, especially viruses. Your best bet is fried or boiled food (soups etc) cooked thoroughly at high heat with a high turnover rate or made to order (so it's not sitting out in the heat), but even then it's a gamble and you could just as easily go into a store and pick something.

          >Cabs at tourist resorts are usually fullblown scams and the cops don't care, so make sure you get a quote before you step into the cab or on the motorbike or whatever. And if possible, take public transportation instead.
          just use uber, bolt, yandex taxi whathever app where you see the final price before entering cab

          >just use uber, bolt, yandex
          ... or Grab in Southeast Asia.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Cabs at tourist resorts are usually fullblown scams and the cops don't care, so make sure you get a quote before you step into the cab or on the motorbike or whatever. And if possible, take public transportation instead.
        just use uber, bolt, yandex taxi whathever app where you see the final price before entering cab

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Don't eat street food in asian countries
        I ate lots of random shit in Vietnam and Thailand, including the actual cheap shit (1 dollar full meal kind of thing), drank coffee with ice, and ate street market fruit, so I likely ingested some tap water at some point. I only had slight stomach problems once, meaning I felt a bit sick and fixed it by taking a slightly runny shit. Obviously if you've spent your whole life pampering your stomach, tossing cooked food after 4 hours outside the fridge and packed food at the expiration date, not eating anything even slightly dodgy, you're a pussy and should probably avoid street food.
        Here's my tip: What you shouldn't do in most of Asia (or any poor country) is go to an actual restaurant. Brown people become completely incompetent when their business' size exceeds 1 person, so you can expect slow service and fricked up orders, as well as the same disregard for sanitation and local bacteria that you get with street food.
        I can imagine this being different in actual shitholes like India, though.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          > Brown people become completely incompetent when their business' size exceeds 1 person

          How are you gonna travel around to different countries and then turn around and call their people moronic to be racist. How about you stay in your country of white karens and eat your unseasoned boiled chicken, don't worry I'm sure it'll be prepared quickly for your troglodyte mind.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            It's just a travel tip, no need to get mad. The food is great and they are good at preparing it, but once the restaurant becomes large enough to require organization, you can expect the organization - and by your extension your experience - to be shit. Basically if it has waitstaff and a manager, you can expect them all to be moronic.

            What's it to you, anyways? Are you brown? You have been given internet access and you use it to write this dumb shit?

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              Your post just seemed moronic, so I called it moronic. In any case, I wouldn’t even agree with the tip in the first place. In many busy places your food is prepared quickly and you are ushered out to make room for other customers. Not really sure where you’re drawing your experience from other than maybe one time you had to wait 15 minutes.

              Also no I am not a cracker

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              >It's just a travel tip, no need to get mad. The food is great and they are good at preparing it, but once the restaurant becomes large enough to require organization, you can expect the organization - and by your extension your experience - to be shit. Basically if it has waitstaff and a manager, you can expect them all to be moronic

              I've never experienced this, honestly. Talking about Vietnam/Thailand. Never gotten a faulty order, they've always been competent, etc. Don't really know what you are on about.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >- Don't eat street food in asian countries. Just don't. If you want something quick and cheap then go to a store and buy something instead.

        Why? I've done this a million times, haven't had a single problem. The street food in Thailand/Vietnam is usually grilled through and kept on the heat until you buy it, virtuallynuking any bacteria. Only times I've gotten sick were once after visiting Hard Rock cafe in Phuket and once in Vietnam due to an unknown reason (small city with no "street food"-type places)

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >- Don't coom in prostitutes. There's diseases you can catch that are chronic and that virtually every prostitute carries. Get on a dating app and pay for some frickable uni student's or single mom's rent for a couple of months instead.

        >mega-bawds who frick randoms online won't have HPV/HSV

        lmao, great advice m8

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Dress like a weekender tourist instead
      so wear hawaiian shirts, cargo shorts and flip crocs?

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, or if you don't wanna look an outright moron a clean t-shirt/shirt and some shorts/pants and normal shoes or flip flops or whatever.

        The things to avoid are:
        - Those ridiculous zip off cargo pants shorts.
        - A hiking backpack.
        - Bead necklaces and bracelets.
        - Dirty clothes.
        - Hiking shoes (yes, even the fricking hiking sneakers).
        - Basically anything bought at an outdoor store or with outdoor branding on it.

        This stuff would give me tons of information about you as a traveler:
        - You hiking shoes alone are worth half a months salary in some third world countries.
        - You're likely carrying a significant deposit of cash and a passport on your person or in your backpack. That's half a year's salary.
        - You've probably got a GoPro, a super expensive camera and a laptop in your backpack. That's more than a year's salary.
        - You might have a tent, a sleeping bag, some fricking gas stove you brought to cook your food on that you'll never use, maybe a gps, etc etc etc. That's another years salary.
        - You're most likely younger and naive. And the more unnecessary shit you carry, the more likely it is that it's the first time you've traveled. If you got fricking rasta beads and dreadlocks and a Bob Marley shirt, then your mind probably isn't as clear as it should be either.

        When you stack it all up it's as if some dude would walk around in the west with multiple years worth of salary on his person. And if you knew someone had like $250K on his person and you saw him being in a vulnerable position and naive... I mean, if you needed the money really badly and could get away with it...

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          i've honestly travelled to some pretty moronic countries in some pretty rural areas and never had to worry about getting robbed once. Not even in shit parts of vietnam/cambodia, even with an expensive camera out. Gotta read a vibe when pulling expensive shit out.

          Although I've never been to south america and never will i feel like thats where most robberies would happen.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            >i've honestly travelled to some pretty moronic countries in some pretty rural areas and never had to worry about getting robbed once
            Southeast Asia isn't bad in terms of outright robberies but there's snatch theft and like you say South America, the Caribbeans, etc would definitely get you robbed at some point.

            And dude, everyone are perfectly safe until the moment they aren't. You're most likely not gonna get in a car crash either, but.........

            >Don't eat street food in asian countries
            I ate lots of random shit in Vietnam and Thailand, including the actual cheap shit (1 dollar full meal kind of thing), drank coffee with ice, and ate street market fruit, so I likely ingested some tap water at some point. I only had slight stomach problems once, meaning I felt a bit sick and fixed it by taking a slightly runny shit. Obviously if you've spent your whole life pampering your stomach, tossing cooked food after 4 hours outside the fridge and packed food at the expiration date, not eating anything even slightly dodgy, you're a pussy and should probably avoid street food.
            Here's my tip: What you shouldn't do in most of Asia (or any poor country) is go to an actual restaurant. Brown people become completely incompetent when their business' size exceeds 1 person, so you can expect slow service and fricked up orders, as well as the same disregard for sanitation and local bacteria that you get with street food.
            I can imagine this being different in actual shitholes like India, though.

            >Obviously if you've spent your whole life pampering your stomach, tossing cooked food after 4 hours outside the fridge and packed food at the expiration date, not eating anything even slightly dodgy, you're a pussy and should probably avoid street food.
            No, you're just moronic. Pathogens don't care about your 300 lbs super tummy.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              Actually i got my luggage stolen in greece last summer, but that was entirely my fault for being lazy and leaving my luggage in the car in a major urban area. They know what the rental cars are and just jimmied the lock and broke in.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              Almost anyone can get used to the foreign bacteria etc. within like 2 weeks, if your body is more used to fighting off your local ones because you're not hyper sanitary with your food, you'll have an easier time getting used to the foreign ones. It's absolutely possible to train your stomach to be more resilient.

              >300 lbs super tummy
              I'm not fat, ironically it's Americans (i.e. the fattest fricks on the planet) who have the biggest issues getting sick from food in Asia, because almost all they eat is super processed food and they are generally paranoid about food safety and wasteful with food.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Almost anyone can get used to the foreign bacteria etc. within like 2 weeks, if your body is more used to fighting off your local ones because you're not hyper sanitary with your food, you'll have an easier time getting used to the foreign ones. It's absolutely possible to train your stomach to be more resilient.
                Not against harmful pathogens. And you write "bacteria" but there's also foodborne viruses and parasites, which just goes to show how limited your knowledge is. There's norovirus, staph, salmonella, tapeworms, e.coli, toxoplasma gondii, campylobacter, listeria, etc. And they all thrive in dirty environments with animals running around and the food sitting out in the heat.

                But yes, you're right in the sense that if you eat food with bacteria your stomach isn't used to, it could get upset and you might have a grumbling stomach and a runny shit. But those aren't the things you have to look out for. That's just normal.

                Your post just seemed moronic, so I called it moronic. In any case, I wouldn’t even agree with the tip in the first place. In many busy places your food is prepared quickly and you are ushered out to make room for other customers. Not really sure where you’re drawing your experience from other than maybe one time you had to wait 15 minutes.

                Also no I am not a cracker

                >In any case, I wouldn’t even agree with the tip in the first place. In many busy places your food is prepared quickly and you are ushered out to make room for other customers.
                Yeah. It has less to with the quality of the staff and more to do with things like, "is the food stored cold before preparation?", "is it a quick turnover or is the food allowed to slowly cool off in the heat?", "is the preparation area dirty?", "are there animals running around?", "does the chef wash his hands?"

                There's no guarantee that restaurant workers wont be filthy slobs, but the fact that they have running water and clean surfaces and places to cool their food and no animals running and that the food (ideally) is made to order; at the very least decreases the risk significantly.

                And if you're hired by a restaurant, you usually have training on basic hygiene. It's obvious to most people that you say shouldn't cut chicken and then cut veggies on the same cutting board, but is it obvious to a 80 IQ pleb with no training? Doubt it.

  8. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Learn to churn points. Travel is better when it’s free and upgraded.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is an underrated travel hack most people don't know about, a significant part of my last trip was paid for by the points i accumulated on my Miles Card.

  9. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    why does no one mention pre-paid master/visa cards? is there some issue using it or what? Id rather just load up a few of those so I dont have to bring my real debit/credit cards.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      seems kinda pointless when credit cards have built in fraud protections already and a higher limit if you ever run into emergencies, don't they also charge you to activate those cards as well?

  10. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    The 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th floors of a hotel are usually the safest. They're low enough to be reached by firetruck ladders, but still high enough that most burglars won't bother breaking in to any rooms.

  11. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Bring some Viagra or Cialis even if you don't plan on cooming just in case
    how old do you think I am?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >take viagra when your 50 - functional boner like you were 20

      >take viagra when your 20 - Adamantium boner with no refractory period for 4 hours

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >>take viagra when your 20 - Adamantium boner with no refractory period for 4 hours

        But viagra just makes you have a boner, it does jack shit for the refractory period. Unless I work differently than others, the refractory period for me isn't a period where I can't get hard, it's a period where I get no further pleasure from sexual stimuli and can't coom

  12. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    >I use a 30L backpack and still have room left for souvenirs
    How many clothes do you usually pack? I'm planning a week trip to Spain in the fall and have a 35L backpack, but I've fallen into the overpacking trap in the past

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Wear dark trousers that dry quickly and shoes that are comfortable to walk in but smart enough for restaurants, and a light smartish jacket to keep you warm/dry. I might tie a sweater around my waist if it was cold , but I wouldn't pack it. Pack t-shirts/underwear/socks for every day of travel, unless you will have time and the means to wash your clothes, in which case pack half that. Anything else can be bought. Hotels or hostels either have towels or can rent one to you or you can buy one up locally.

  13. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    >make sure to try it out at home with a low dose first, lol.
    W-what can happen if I don't? I have about 10mg of cialis for porn-induced erection disorder/deathgrip syndrome but haven't had the chance to try it out yet

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      If you don't try it out? I guess it just doesn't work when you need it and you're left feeling embarrassed and humiliated while the girl rolls her eyes and gets herself off.

  14. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    What should I be looking for in a suitcase?
    I feel like these are so standardized, it's hard to go wrong
    Any particular brand that stands out?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      idk but i'll say this. from now on, i'll only use a hard case for a carry-on sized bag. checked sizes take up too much floor space when you have to completely open them like a book. hate it

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      This many people can't be wrong about a luggage set...right?

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >trusting amazon reviews
        Even the hivemind at reddit gave up on that.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        I would have loved to get this but my cards are not acceptable on Amazon.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Get a VISA card anon preferably a virtual one to save time.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            Miles card is a good one to start with.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Just look for something that has some warranty and keep in mind that these things will be scratched up to hell and back, will eventually have a wheel snapped off or eventually crack.
      So dont spend an arm and a leg on fancy luggage, but dont be cheap either.
      I got a Samsonite suitcase on sale that came with a generous warranty and (should) be covered internationally.

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