Travel to Antarctica?

Alright, so how can I travel there?

I think my best route in would be to find a job at McMurdo station. There are a number of skilled and unskilled jobs, but learning how to pilot a helicopter seems like the best way in.

What do you think?

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    learning how to pilot a helicopter plus getting four thousand hours plus getting the professional connection to get in the door with that contractor

    a few people on this board and sighsee work there. one for the british and a couple of americans. i have heard the pay is pretty mediocre and the unskilled jobs get really tedious.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Any other relatively skilled job (and even some unskilled ones) requires about the same investment of time or more.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        They literally employ cleaners and cooks you gay. These are entry level positions.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          yea scrub dishes for $9 an hour, that'll be a great antarctic experience

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            So your plan is to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars plus years learning to become a helicopter pilot, then getting years of experience in your new career as a helicopter pilot, then finding some way to get a contract to fly helicopters in Antarctica?

            Listen, there are two ways YOU, the fucking dipshit low skill loser retard gets to go to Antarctica:

            1. A paid tour

            2. As a fucking cleaner or a cook

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              I am, however, not a low skill dipshit loser retard.
              I want a pilot’s license anyways.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                They are almost certainly hiring people with thousands of flight hours on their specific helicopters. Its fine if you are setting this as a goal for ten years from now, but getting your license thinking it'll be next stop Antarctica is not feasible. Even if you are networked in, these are pretty coveted jobs.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >I am, however, not a low skill dipshit loser retard.
                Your faggy compsci or basic bitch engineering degree do not qualify you as high skill in this context. Relative to the hordes of people much more qualified than you to do the hyper-specific types of work they have available, yes, you are a low skill dipshit loser retard.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                There’s always the position of lab serf/dishwasher. Working in a lab for several years at the lowest position sounds like hell, though.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I've done some research on getting work there and I can confirm what this anon is saying. From what I've heard it's exciting for a week or two but then it's miserable.
      It depends on your temperament and what you're looking for though.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can also save up 20k or whatever is the minimum cost tours there usually have.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      this
      the niche of being in Antarctica will get old real fast when you have to work the nightshift for the hundredth time after months of being stuck there

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        You millennials just can't seem to realize you have to work to get things in life, be it a house, travel, a decent woman, you expect everything for free

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          yeah but i can do that in my home country and then afford to go on a holiday cruise to Antarctica instead of working in a bunker for months on end.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Still a different experience though.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              i think the point is be qualified to do a real job and not just go down there to be a wagie. if you set yourself a five year time horizon for it you should be able to get the skills and experience necessary.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                I think that there isn't such a big gap between a janitor and a scientist on a remote research station.
                One has to keep the station running, the other has to keep the experiments running and there's a big overlap because of the crews being as small as possible.
                So an ice janny will have to assist with drilling ice and the scientists will have to help with fixing the ventilation system.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                This is true, even the most qualified person there is a glorified jannie who needs to shovel snow with everyone else.
                >Performs other duties as required, including community duties such as janitorial, snow removal and emergency response.
                At least you get paid

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >At least you get paid
                how much?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                i work there. they are desperate for people this season, I think there positions unfilled still now.

                >So an ice janny will have to assist with drilling ice and the scientists will have to help with fixing the ventilation system.
                lol no. job crossover is pretty minimal, almost non-existant. if you're an ice janny you gonna stay cleaning toilets and the grantees (aka scientists) are off in the own little world

                Even if your audience was composed of scientists, I think they'd be appreciative of someone who worked there as support staff and has stories to share.

                I've heard its basically like working at a man camp oil rig or mine or similar shit, in the sense that you're stuck there, there's little to do, the nature around the area isn't all that accessible, your stuck inside much of the time, even in the summer the weather is extreme, and most of the food you eat will be canned or dry goods.

                >I've heard its basically like working at a man camp oil rig or mine or similar shit, in the sense that you're stuck there, there's little to do, the nature around the area isn't all that accessible, your stuck inside much of the time, even in the summer the weather is extreme, and most of the food you eat will be canned or dry goods.

                sort of. there's a lot of recreation opportunities and stuff. great parties, great social atmosphere. you won't get a lot of time outside the base in your first few seasons unless you have a job that does it.
                >light vehicle mechanic
                >pilot/helitack
                >grantee
                some factilities people will go out there. a few equipment operators. those are sought after though, you will have to work your way up.
                ---------------

                if you're looking for a job you probably want to start with PAE.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                oh fwiw the galley jobs are with gana a yoo services corporation. they'll hire anyone to mop floors and do dishes

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >job crossover is pretty minimal, almost non-existant
                Guess those stations are much bigger than the remote research facilities I visited before.
                On the plus side you probably have much better infrastructure then.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      this
      the niche of being in Antarctica will get old real fast when you have to work the nightshift for the hundredth time after months of being stuck there

      It's about 4-5 months for a summer deployment. That's definitely manageable for the experience.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I don't know about antarctica but i have heard this attitude many many many times and its doesn't usually end well. five months is easy to say you can do, its another thing to actually do it. that's a hundred and fifty days in about the roughest climate imaginable doing a zero prestige, zero pay (relatively), miserable job.

        >hey anon wow you went to ANTARCTICA? are you like a climate scientist or pilot or crazy badass or something
        >well actually no i mopped floors
        >haha OK yeah im sure *everyone* mops floors anon, gotta all pitch in! what else did you do? are you like the world's best mechanic or some sort of niche technician? i bet its pretty cool to be the best in the world at what you do!
        >well I also washed dishes and cleaned toilets....
        >that's cool I guess anon... oh hey I've gotta go almost forgot about that thing I gotta do...i'll see ya later maybe though ok?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >scientist
          >but not climate scientist
          >only job there is wagie lab manager
          I fucked up didn't I

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            lab manager is probably a pretty cool job there honestly. you're in on the projects and involved in a lot of cool stuff. for many people you'll probably have the most interesting job of anyone they've ever met. im sure there's some inside baseball type things that would be mega interesting to know too.

            not that I'd really know the first thing about antarctica, but I'm just imagining that's a good job. better than being some low-level zero skill wagie.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          That's when you lie and say that you were in charge of the technical aspect of the laboratory and people couldn't have done without you.
          Also cleaning shitters in Antarctica requires special skills as far as I know.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            you might be able to bullshit people a bit but anyone who is reasonably intelligent or, even worse, knows a thing or two is going to see through it.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Let's be honest, a janitorial position in Antarctica is still an impressive topic to talk about if you can present it well and your audience isn't composed of scientists with experience in extreme territories.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Even if your audience was composed of scientists, I think they'd be appreciative of someone who worked there as support staff and has stories to share.

                I've heard its basically like working at a man camp oil rig or mine or similar shit, in the sense that you're stuck there, there's little to do, the nature around the area isn't all that accessible, your stuck inside much of the time, even in the summer the weather is extreme, and most of the food you eat will be canned or dry goods.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Imagine going to Antarctica, mopping floors, and not lying about the cool shit you did when you got back. It would be almost impossible for anyone to verify.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Join the Young Global Leaders.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Watch sora yori first.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    don't do it there are tower monsters that roam the planes

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    You meme, but no, at least not yet. Internet is restricted down there and extremely shitty. Satellites aren’t really an option due to their positioning.

    Supposedly starlink will cover Antarctica, but we’ll see whether or not that happens.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    take a cruise

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I am a doctor in my thirties. Can I work there?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      From what I’ve read, yes they do have positions for medical staff.

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