Traveling the World

Is it a silly dream to want to travel around the entire world?

I have the instinctual urge to go be a vagabond that never returns home, but I have the sensibility to know it's expensive and/or risky to go out so long, and the novelty could wear off at any moment. At the same time, American work culture's generic "2 weeks per year" shit is not really enough to get a good feel for the world. I just don't want to die without seeing the planet and its people in an organic fashion. Any thoughts?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    1. Establish your career
    2. Take a sabbatical

    > t. guy on sabbatical who previously made almost $200k/yr

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm about a year into full time career employment. I was considering doing something like this:
      >2-3 years on
      >2-4 months off
      But I'm worried that I can't line up a job several months in advance unless I'm some super desirable godlike worker. Maybe this is doable until I reach my mid 30s and decide to get more serious with life?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Assuming you're a knowledge worker, job hop every 1 to 2 years and learn how to parlay each work experience. You can get to six figures pretty easily, pay off your debts and save a ton of cash which is what made taking a sabbatical less scary for me.

        If you're not a knowledge worker then I have no advice for you.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Industrial engineering. 25yo and I make around 70k a year. No rent cause I live with my parents though.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Looks good.

            My salary progression was as follows between the ages of 23 (when I graduated college with a CS degree) and 29 (when I quit my job and started traveling).

            57k -> 59k -> 68k -> 80k -> (job hop after 3 years, should have done it sooner though) -> 90k -> 110k -> (job hop) -> 150k -> (laid off) -> 170k -> quit.

            Paid off 30k in student loans, a 15k car loan, saved 120k cash (+ more in retirement accounts) and was paying 1400 - 1900 a month in rent (my biggest expense).

            Since I've quit, I've been paying 480 a month for cobra insurance. Like I said, it's really not that scary to quit once your career is established. I can flip a switch on Linkedin and have interviews lined up next week.

            A vagabond who spent his prime career ladder climbing years fricking around in the balkans can't do that, but I'm not judging them. Traveling is awesome, but I'm glad I paid my dues early. Also, in retrospect, I could have done a lot more with the 2 weeks PTO I was granted. You'd be surprised by how much you can do and see in 7 days in some places. I'm usually ready to go home after about 10-14 days.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Europoor here, will finish my Masters in Data Science soon, but also have a lot of CS stuff.
              Which skills would you recommend I grind now in order to land a high paying job, ideally in the states? For that money I am indifferent whether it is programming, software architecture stuff or DS
              Also, does the pay increase happen automatically or do you have to annoy your boss every few months?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >in the states
                Ask around on H1B/big tech forums, namely Blind.

                >Also, does the pay increase happen automatically or do you have to annoy your boss every few months?
                I've never asked for a promotion or a pay increase. I've given myself high marks on my self-eval which usually has bonus implications but my biggest bumps have come from job hopping. Job hopping is common for younger employees so they should bump your pay automatically unless they WANT you to leave.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Blind
                Will check that out ty
                >I've given myself high marks on my self-eval which usually has bonus implications
                That sounds like quite the broken system. Do you get a higher workload also when doing something like that?

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                It's only broken in the sense that it's kind of irrelevant. Bonus money is allocated to teams and then it's up to the manager to decide how much each individual gets.

                Your manager already knows if you were useful or not by the time your annual review comes around.

                The one time I gave myself above average remarks is when I was trying to get one last big bonus for the frick of it right before I quit (lol). It didn't work, but I wasn't punished either.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                It varies from company to company. A decent company will usually have an annual raise review, if not one after your first six months to adjust your pay. Others only do raises upon promotion, some only on protest from the employee. Union raises are typically structured by tenure and position, not skill. Just depends on who you work for.

                That's why job hopping is so beneficial, you get realistic pay bumps (10-30%) instead of the marginal (2-10%) bumps you get just to counter inflation and cost of living.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      moronic. Young guys should realize that only 0.01% of them will have a career that goes anywhere before their 30s. Given that fact, the 99.99% may as well be vagabonds, ESL teachers, bohemian poets and travel writers, ski bums or whatever else their heart desires. Just be prepared to buck down into your vocation as you near 30. You want to know what you want to do with your life by 27 ideally. But before that? Travel, join the military, do whatever. Experience life. Just do not be a NEET shut in that never leaves his hometown or college town.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not really. Modern life is basically existential hell and travel at least excites the nerves enough to keep you interested and engaged in life. Eventually you’ll wish you planted roots somewhere but it’s like hunger, you can always plant your roots once you get the urge. Beyond that, the only hurdle is money.

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