What happens if you just sleep like a homeless person in China?

What happens if you just sleep like a homeless person in China? I'm a cheap frick who can sleep anywhere, so I'm thinking of just sleeping somewhere in the streets on the days I don't get to sleep at a chinese qt's place

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  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I got lost in shanghai, the streets were empty and somebody called the police on me. They were kind and helped me to get to my hotel, but without the hotel you will be surely detained

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      That was nice of the police. But was mostly thinking of going to the more remote, non-touristy places like Wuhan etc where, I'd assume, the only people sleeping in the streets are locals so the police don't even bother

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        If you're a white man with high test, they will be skeptical of things you do. They purely don't understand high test men. Just be good and play by their rules

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          I don't believe in muh high test but what worries me is that I don't look very friendly, am 6'5 and a white gaijin chud in their land. Was wondering if someone more well-travelled could tell me how well it works to just be really submissive and know a few of their words and hope that's enough to let them leave me alone and continue sleepin

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            The ignorant white boy pass will get you a long way it’s true. The worst is when they try to invite you to stay at their home instead, and you have to convince them you really prefer to sleep rough.
            Where geographically are you planning on doing this, roughly?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        You have to register your place of stay on arrival and at the local police station once you arrive, so good luck

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Lmao. You have to do this all over. I have always just not reported to the police stations I'm supposed to, and just made up a place whenever I'm asked. I refuse to believe that anyone who has ever been a tourist actually believes you have to follow those stupid rules. Get off this board.

          That was nice of the police. But was mostly thinking of going to the more remote, non-touristy places like Wuhan etc where, I'd assume, the only people sleeping in the streets are locals so the police don't even bother

          >remote, non-touristy places
          >like Wuhan
          Lmao.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >I have always just not reported
            This is fine until it isn't. They know you did this and chose not to care, but if they want to frick with you theyre now free to entry ban/refuse visa whenever

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    It used to be okay. I slept in front of a bank without encountering any issues the last time I went to Hong Kong, more than 10 years ago before the territory has been commiefied. Now, if you do that, you're asking to be buttraped by correction officers

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    You sound like one of those burdenmaxxers who doesn't want to pay for lodging or food. If you truly want to escape the financial system, make arrangements to work and stay with a traditional subsistence farmer. Begging for handouts and occupying spaces that are not yours is disgraceful behavior.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      An alternate perspective, privatizing all public space and denying access to people who mean no harm is disgraceful behavior. You’d probably call the cops on a rave.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        It is homeless people who are privatizing downtown public spaces for themselves.
        Lolbertarian arguments like "drug users and homeless people don't mean any harm, stop violating their freedoms" are 2005-era naive bullshit, and anyone who has visited cities with numerous street people can experience the filth, degradation and insecurity for themselves.
        Even homeless forest campers who "bother nobody" destroy vegetation, start irresponsible fires, leave their shit & trash scattered around their campsite, and always abandon crap like mattresses and tarps that were donated to them when they leave. It's amazing how trashed and polluted an urban natural area gets when cities allow even a small number of mentally ill bums to set up residency.

        I don't believe in muh high test but what worries me is that I don't look very friendly, am 6'5 and a white gaijin chud in their land. Was wondering if someone more well-travelled could tell me how well it works to just be really submissive and know a few of their words and hope that's enough to let them leave me alone and continue sleepin

        If you are a backpacker who likes to sleep rough while exploring a country, it shouldn't be a problem to find a secluded place to hide for the night and move on in the morning. A bicycle would make it so much easier to get around. There are many vlogs of people who have rough camped across China by bicycle.

        The ignorant white boy pass will get you a long way it’s true. The worst is when they try to invite you to stay at their home instead, and you have to convince them you really prefer to sleep rough.
        Where geographically are you planning on doing this, roughly?

        Do Asians invite random foreigners into their homes? Maybe if you are very likeable and miraculously devoid of body odor...

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Do Asians invite random foreigners into their homes?
          Arabs yes. Pajeets yes. East Asians no. SEA creatures no.

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Do it and report back OP.
    Not really the same thing but I did this for 4 nights in Taipei, there’s so much forest around the city it was easy to hide my hammock. I never had the balls to try to sleep in a doorway or underpass.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I never had the balls to try to sleep in a doorway or underpass
      >hammock
      >forest
      >taiwan
      yeah but you had the balls to sleep with the huge ass spiders? what the hell

      You sound like one of those burdenmaxxers who doesn't want to pay for lodging or food. If you truly want to escape the financial system, make arrangements to work and stay with a traditional subsistence farmer. Begging for handouts and occupying spaces that are not yours is disgraceful behavior.

      >who doesn't want to pay for lodging or food
      Yes I said that
      >you truly want to escape the financial system
      I work for myself and I don't want your handouts
      >make arrangements to work and stay with a traditional subsistence farmer
      Good idea

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    you get put in jail

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    For cultural reasons police will detain anyone in China who doesn't know what they're doing, Chinese or foreign.
    There are no civil liberties, police can detain anyone, anywhere, at any time, for any reason.
    Anyone who's doing something odd, who's lost, who's drunk, who's causing trouble, people who look like they're in the wrong province, police just walk right up to you and say "get back in line, go back where you're meant to be"

    They'll march tourists back to hotels, march migrant workers back to factories, drag drunks home, drag homeless people out of sight, they'll kill stray dogs.

    They see this as helping, preserving order, keeping up appearances. This universally repressive behaviour is the central characteristic of Chinese culture

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      For example I went to a theme park and went down the wrong path, it was just a path that wasn't finished or something.
      Police turn up and escort me back to the "right" path.
      I'm at the train station waiting for a train, police come, ask where I'm going and escort me to the "correct" waiting area, question me about why I'm "too early".
      Outside my hotel looking for food, police come, escort me to my hotel. Send the bellboy with instant noodles, no leave hotel.
      I was escorted out of a vegetable market, probably an illegal vegetable market. No idea I just though it looked cool.

      This was years ago, but it's still very much the same from what I hear. Even in the big "liberal" cities these invisible lines are everywhere. You can walk around in a clown costume and be "ok" but get escorted like a criminal out of your own office car park for being there at the wrong time.

      I got detained for walking up a hill instead of using the tourist lift. The line for the lift was so long that walking was faster, there was a cement path and everything. I assume the lift was like 20y or something but it was bizarre. The police tried to work out whether I was walking up or walking down, so they could escort me back where I came from so I still had to pay for the lift.

      Chain link fence denying access to any place which might otherwise be a public place. If there's a river and houses, they will try to chain link fence the tiny strip imbetween them nobody can build on.
      A "park" has 247 security, any piece of land that's just empty? Chain link.

      I got a whole family detained once for having lunch with them, state security wanted to know if they were illegaly providing me accommodation. What was scary was that someone reported us within 30 minutes state security were there

      This anon is right, and anyone who says otherwise hasn't spent much time outside the more foreigner-friendly areas of the big cities.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        so you can basically do nothing on a whim? how do people support the prostitution industry then?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I genuinely dont know how you guys can have had this experience. You must be doing something odd or otherwise calling extreme attention to yourself. I've been to every T1 & T2, and travelled smaller T3-T88 extensively and literally never once had a run in with police, and only occasional run ins with mall security (because I wasnt masked during covid). The idea that you're getting stopped everywhere while just walking around is crazy to me, and I've never heard any other China expats complain of such a thing

        so you can basically do nothing on a whim? how do people support the prostitution industry then?

        You can do whatever on a whim. These anons are either extreme outliers or, like I said in a prev post, saying 'police' when it was really 'security' and 'detained' when they really mean 'casually spoken to'

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    For example I went to a theme park and went down the wrong path, it was just a path that wasn't finished or something.
    Police turn up and escort me back to the "right" path.
    I'm at the train station waiting for a train, police come, ask where I'm going and escort me to the "correct" waiting area, question me about why I'm "too early".
    Outside my hotel looking for food, police come, escort me to my hotel. Send the bellboy with instant noodles, no leave hotel.
    I was escorted out of a vegetable market, probably an illegal vegetable market. No idea I just though it looked cool.

    This was years ago, but it's still very much the same from what I hear. Even in the big "liberal" cities these invisible lines are everywhere. You can walk around in a clown costume and be "ok" but get escorted like a criminal out of your own office car park for being there at the wrong time.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ive never had this or anything like it happen in 7 years of living in China. My only interaction with police was one time when I ran a red light on my moped

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        After 7 years though you're probably used to where those invisible lines are, what I'd done "wrong" would have probably been obvious to you.

        And based on where you are in China and who you are, the rules are obviously different, doubtless there's a whole set of paranoid Chinese public order violations you could commit as well.

        I've been told that these people weren't all "police" in the western sense, but from a western point of view they are all functionally police. State security, state police, park rangers, private security, whatever. Police.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Your examples sound to me a combination of made up, or misinterpreted/deliberately misconstrued instances where security guards (like mall cops) approach you and you’re saying it was the police. The thing thats so obviously nonsense about what you’re saying is the insistence on this ‘invisible social order’ and lines that really dont exist - China is chaotic and the people dont obey lines, one way streets, entry/exit distinction, etc. Again all I can say for sure is Ive never experienced what you’re describing, and its not because Im so in tune with invisible rules

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Your examples sound to me a combination of made up, or misinterpreted/deliberately misconstrued instances where security guards (like mall cops) approach you and you’re saying it was the police. The thing thats so obviously nonsense about what you’re saying is the insistence on this ‘invisible social order’ and lines that really dont exist - China is chaotic and the people dont obey lines, one way streets, entry/exit distinction, etc. Again all I can say for sure is Ive never experienced what you’re describing, and its not because Im so in tune with invisible rules

          China has a lot of private security that are basically police-adjacent.
          China is also weird in that authorities are both very hands-off but also draconian at the same time and enforcement depends a lot on who stands to lose face by the existence of asocial behavior. That's why they're trying to push digital population surveillance so hard.
          As a foreigner these days you'll of course be under much greater scrutiny.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            lol anon got kicked out of the playground by a mall cop

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >China is also weird in that authorities are both very hands-off but also draconian at the same time and enforcement depends a lot on who stands to lose face by the existence of asocial behavior.
            We have a word for that, it's called being authoritarian

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I got detained for walking up a hill instead of using the tourist lift. The line for the lift was so long that walking was faster, there was a cement path and everything. I assume the lift was like 20y or something but it was bizarre. The police tried to work out whether I was walking up or walking down, so they could escort me back where I came from so I still had to pay for the lift.

    Chain link fence denying access to any place which might otherwise be a public place. If there's a river and houses, they will try to chain link fence the tiny strip imbetween them nobody can build on.
    A "park" has 247 security, any piece of land that's just empty? Chain link.

    I got a whole family detained once for having lunch with them, state security wanted to know if they were illegaly providing me accommodation. What was scary was that someone reported us within 30 minutes state security were there

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