where can I get a job traveling with research groups to middle of bumfrick nowhere? no I am not getting a geology degree

where can I get a job traveling with research groups to middle of bumfrick nowhere? no I am not getting a geology degree

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    if ur a uni student do summer research programs abroad, i did one in western sahara

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >where can I get a job traveling with research groups to middle of bumfrick nowhere?
    Doing what, exactly? And which kinds of bumfrick nowhere?

    If you’re specifically interested in volcanoes, you’re almost certainly shit out of luck; a friend of mine who actually studied geology and was trying to become a volcanologist was able to visit a bunch of research projects/stations on exploding mountains during his studies, and the staff and crews at each and every one of them told him to abandon any hope of getting professionally involved. Volcano research is massively overbooked—a small handful of professors globally has command of a looooong waiting list of grad student and postdoctoral volcano nerds climbing over one another begging to do the most miserable of scutwork for basically no money.

    Same is true of most academic field research—in most fields in most places, there’s a surfeit of aspiring academics with relevant qualifications and technical skills already in line. And for non-research stuff like logistics, transport, security, cooking and cleaning, etc., locals are usually available for cheap to do whatever the PhDs can’t or don’t want to do.

    I have heard of non-academics picking up grunt work for archaeological digs, but it’s not something that a research team is going to fly you around the world to do. Some digs actually have “voluntourism” programs where grunts pay *them.*

    There absolutely might be some support staff opportunities at some research stations—I know the Antarctic bases hire food service people, handymen, garbagemen, janitors from outside. And mining companies hire a range of non-specialist employees for some of their work (not research, but also grunt work in remote places, so close enough). But in general you’re going to need some kind of specialized skill or training to offer.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >volcanoes
      the op image is bad. I was implying something like antarctica like you said but that might be the edge case because nobody wants to freeze to death in a desert.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Antarctica
        https://careers.leidos.com/search/jobs?q=antarctica

        https://gylantarctica.workbrightats.com/jobs/

        These are just two or about six contracting companies that currently have support staff vacancies down in the big cold empty desert. The others are listed here:

        https://www.usap.gov/jobsandopportunities/

        This is of course just for the American base at McMurdo, but that’s the biggest outfit down there by an order of magnitude.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          If you're a neet then Antarctica is your best chance. They hire any fricking moron down there to work a lot of jobs, but the pay is shit and you'll be around a bunch of people who feel like they're exceptional because they boarded a plane and now refer to themselves as 'antarcticans'

          OP most likely isn't getting hired with Leidos because those are the station management positions and he has no skills. His best bet is with Amentum working as a fuely or one of the air trans/shuttle driver/fuels jobs or GSC as galley/janitorial staff

          t. worked there 2021-2022 summer season

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >t. worked there 2021-2022 summer season
            What did you do, and how did you like it? I have a friend who nearly went down to do some kind of food service management role, but he ended up changing his mind and working on cruise ships for a few years, ending up with what I suspect would have been similar complaints about pay, hours, and working conditions, but arguably better weather when he wasn’t on an Arctic or Alaskan contract.

            And have you read Big Dead Place, either before or afterwards?

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >no I am not getting a geology degree
    Then get a zoology degree
    If you work with seabirds, like me or remote island ecosystems and get the right jobs you get to visit insanely remote places that are otherwise closed to the public

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >how do I get this extremely hard to achieve and competitive thing? No I am not prepared to work hard or commit to the usual requirements

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If you are interested in linguistics, some anon on SighSee mentioned he’s a linguistics researcher and gets to live in Bhutan for months at a time, some of the languages there are unstudied and only spoken in one or two isolated valleys.
      But generally you’re going to need at least an undergraduate degree to be part of any research team, though archaeological field schools will accept anyone (granted you have to pay a few grand to participate). A PhD will open greater options.
      If none of that sounds appealing, see

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Field linguistics is an amazing, very challenging, and in some ways strange field.

        One of the most famous institutions in the field is an outfit called the Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL), which runs intensive bootcamps teaching people how to learn and meticulously document/record rare, threatened, and occasionally even uncontacted languages from scratch. Once they have been trained, SIL linguists get dropped in the wilderness all over the place. I think at least some of them don’t even have formal academic postings/affiliations outside of SIL, so they’re not necessarily young professors or doctoral students doing dissertation research, although they must have some educational prerequisites; the work itself is very, very difficult and needs to be rigorous.

        The weird bit is that SIL is a missionary organization, with the goal of translating the Bible into every language spoken on Earth. But their fieldwork is first-rate, and gets cited by normal/secular academic linguists all the time.

        But it’s not work for slackers, by any means, Jesus freak or not—it’s a ton of work that not everyone, even every linguist, can pull off.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    get a geology degree

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You will need a degree in something. If you don't like geology then try:
    >zoology/biology/ecology/botany
    >marine sciences
    >archaeology
    >palaeontology
    >meteorology
    >geospatial/remote sensing/topography
    >photography

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Be me, work as a retail store vendor
    >Have to go to several stores in my territory
    >Get along with one of the girls at my store
    >Start talking to her
    >She gets touchy and smiles at me
    >Want to wait until I leave my job to ask her out
    >Few months later, abruptly quit job because of manager
    >Decide to go to her store on my day off at new job
    >See her with a baby bump

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I spent a year working at a field station on this little island, ama

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      what do you eat

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        big store of non-perishable goods, which we'd cook communally every evening. Also some fresher stuff whenever a boat with supplies came every month or so. Also we caught fresh fish

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Were you the seabird guy posting above? If so, what sorts of birds are/were you looking at, and what is interesting about them? Are you working on PhD, as some kind of research assistant, or other?

      Also curious to know what your day-to-day research activities are like. I have friends who’ve done zoological or ecological work for various government agencies doing stuff they described as “counting fish” and “dissecting bear shit,” among other things, but the details are pretty mysterious to me as someone who, y’know, works indoors.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Were you the seabird guy posting above? If so, what sorts of birds are/were you looking at, and what is interesting about them? Are you working on PhD, as some kind of research assistant, or other?
        Yea that was me. Have worked on a variety of different island ecosystem and/or seabird projects. Lots of island species like breeding seabirds are threatened by invasive rodents eating their eggs and chicks so monitoring that is a big part of it. Also done projects where we attach GPS trackers to wild seabirds to see where they feed, migrate, and whether they are affected by offshore windfarms. I was a research assistant for most of these, although PhDs are a good way to get into it, but you'll spend less time actually on location in the field than dedicated fieldworkers.

        Day to day activities for the role on that island included walking transects to locate seabird nests and burrows, catching adults and chicks to attach ID rings and take biometrics, surveying for and removing invasive plant species, monitoring native reptiles including injecting ID chips to snakes to determine populations size etc. Lots of maintenance work, plant nursery stuff aswell. It can vary hugely depending on the project

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Postdoc here. You should understand something fundamental about the academic research business: Principle Investigators (usually profs) win (usually big, national) money, spend it on postdocs, students in lab, technicians, etc. so to produce publications which bolster the academic's CV that has only 2 sections publications and money won. The cycle repeats and the side effect is a great deal of knowledge (quality varies) is generated all over the world under the exact same model.

    Put yourself in the PI's shoes: Why the hell does anyone want to hire you when there's an army of researchers, researchers in training, hired guns with valuable skills, etc. available? Are you exceedingly cheap and your time worthless? If not then you clearly won't beat out a local at the fieldwork site.

    /t. geomorphologist

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