Your mandatory travel rules

For example, if a country requires me to submit my passport to some embassy for a visa, I am not going. If a tourist visa costs more than $60 I am not going either.

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  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >le funny SighSee meme xddd
    You are an incel living in his moms basement anyway

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anywhere that needs more than visa on arrival, I ain’t going

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/e32DALv.png

      For example, if a country requires me to submit my passport to some embassy for a visa, I am not going. If a tourist visa costs more than $60 I am not going either.

      Assuming you’re both serious, I can’t understand this impulse. Is it anxiety about sending (or handing) your passport to foreign authorities for a couple of days, for fear of something happening to it? Or perhaps for fear of them having you on file somewhere? This in particular makes little sense to me, since anyplace that scans your passport when you arrive visa-free (which is to say almost everywhere) has you on file by default, even though nobody never looks at it.

      Is it distaste for the whole idea of asking for permission to come? Maybe just annoyance at the hassle/paperwork/time or money involved?

      To the person who won’t travel unless there’s a visa on arrival, do you also object to places that make you buy some kind of e-visa online? Even if you have it within seconds?

      Anyway, if that’s a rule you really insist on living by, then go ahead. Assuming you’ve both got strong passports, it doesn’t really limit your options grievously (especially since visas on arrival have become substantially more common just in the last ten years).

      But it baffles me completely.

      I have very few hard and fast rules apart from not going to active conflict zones or places with very hot insurgency/unrest. Not exclusively because of concerns for my personal safety, although I have a wife and kids who need me and wouldn’t want me to get blown up. But also, even more so, because gawkers in places where people are in crisis just get in the way and take resources that locals need a lot more than you do. Spreading around a bit of backpacker chump change doesn’t adequately cover the cost of feeding you or charging your phone when you shouldn’t be there and they don’t have the option to leave. Plus crisis zones are expensive and inconvenient. Price gouging, checkpoints, people with guns asking for bribes. It’s not as thrilling as it is annoying unless you’re pretty dumb.

      >t. Worked in fricked-up places for a while.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I want to be able to book everything online, I don't want to ship my $341 AUD passport to some embassy or have to travel all the way to it. Plus there is always the risk they just flat out deny it and you've wasted thousands on hotels and flights. Countries like China require your ticket numbers and accommodation before you apply so you don't really have a choice

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >I want to be able to book everything online, I don't want to ship my $341 AUD passport to some embassy or have to travel all the way to it.
          Legitimate gripes, I suppose. Not dealbreakers for me personally, though. I have had the good fortune to be able to just walk into consulates whenever I have needed to apply for visas in advance. I also assume that the number of passports that get lost in transit is very small (I’ve never mailed my passport out that I can remember, only renewed a passport that had to be mailed back to me, but it was quick, easy and successful in my case), but the irritation would no doubt be significant if you were one of the unfortunate few.

          >Plus there is always the risk they just flat out deny it and you've wasted thousands on hotels and flights.
          It’s very rare, though. Insurance, a responsive credit card, and/or refundable bookings might be worth it to reduce this risk.

          >Countries like China require your ticket numbers and accommodation before you apply so you don't really have a choice
          Do they? I haven’t been to China in years, can’t recall. But how many visa applications do they deny, and on what grounds? I went to China for work three times, and on the third of those, I was asked back to the consulate to provide additional documentation about why I was going (I was attending a conference, and the MoFA decided suddenly to require all attendees to provide an official red-stamped invitation letter from someone in China, which they’d previously never asked for), but once I got the appropriate document I had my visa after just a couple of days’ delay.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >I want to be able to book everything online
          moronic but ok
          >Plus there is always the risk they just flat out deny it and you've wasted thousands on hotels and flights
          first get the visa? you dumb frick
          >Countries like China require your ticket numbers and accommodation before you apply
          those can be free to cancel

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I cannot be bothered by the paperwork and time needed for complex tourist visa processes, I’ll just go somewhere else instead. E visa is fine that’s just a web form that’s easier than buying the flight, and I expect work permits to be a huge pain. But horrible applications just to come in and look at stuff? no

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I hate lying, and when someone ask me how long I'm going to be somewhere, I don't know, I'm a spontaneous hopeless romantic.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >But horrible applications just to come in and look at stuff? no
        This.
        I'm not spending a bunch of time and money to go get permission to go somewhere I'll be constantly harassed by beggars and scammers.

        If you have a 1st world passport, countries that demand an extensive in-person visa process are generally poorly run shitholes like Congo. There's few exceptions. I'd like to visit Russia and would get the visa for that, maybe when things settle down.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        great response

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Imagine being filtered by such elementary requirements.

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    There are certain airlines I refuse to fly with, and certain airports that I refuse to fly out of. I also refuse to pay extra for emergency row seating. I don't mind paying extra for a real upgrade, and I don't mind sitting in the emergency row for free, but I will never pay extra for the privilege of additional responsibility.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >There are certain airlines I refuse to fly with, and certain airports that I refuse to fly out of.
      Which ones, and why, exactly?

      No need to explain the financial choices.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Airlines:
        >Air Canada (AC)
        >Air China (CA)
        >China Eastern (MU)
        >China Southern (CZ)
        >China Airlines (CI)
        Low quality service, rude staff, poor customer support (if it gets that far)

        Airports:
        >Toronto (YYZ)
        >Paris (CDG)
        >Frankfurt (FRA)
        >Delhi (DEL)
        Disorganized messes

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Countries where I cannot pay in cash every. single. time. period. (looking at you UK)

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